Air International 2019-09
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Main: Military
To celebrate the 75th anniversary of the formation of the Aircraft Research and Development Unit, three aircraft with a historical link to the unit and still showcasing the unit’s tail-flash took to the skies over Nowra and the Shoalhaven coastline. The formation contained a PC-9/A aircraft currently used by the unit along with a Royal Australian Air Force F/A-18B Hornet and a Douglas Dakota, owned and maintained by the Historical Aircraft Restoration Society based at Albion Park. The ADRU plans, conducts and analyses the results of ground and flight tests of existing and new Air Force aircraft and consists of four flights located at RAAF Bases Edinburgh, Amberley, Richmond and Williamtown, staffed by qualified test pilots, flight test engineers and flight test system specialists.
An F-16C assigned to the 18th Aggressor Squadron, refuels from an Alaska Air National Guard KC-135R Stratotanker.
F/A-18A Hornet A21-32 assigned to the Aircraft Research and Development Unit, transits over the Woomera Test Range after a test mission for the JDAM-ER.
A 168th Wing KC-135R Stratotanker parked on the ramp at Eielson Air Force Base, de-iced and with heaters running, awaiting the arrival of its crew.
An F-16C assigned to the 18th Aggressor Squadron, refuels from an Alaska Air National Guard KC-135R Stratotanker.
The pilot of KC-135R 62-3524 looks out the cockpit while conducting pre-flight checks. This aircraft wears nose art featuring the legend 'Ice Dogs', the name of the Fairbanks ice hockey team.
A crew chief assigned to the 168th Wing prepares KC-135R 62-3524 for a mission from a snow-packed Eielson.
An Alaska Air National Guard KC-135R flies over its home station, Eielson Air Force Base during typical winter conditions found at the base in the month of December.
Aircraft Research and Development Unit Mirage III A3-2 inverted over a hill near Woomera fitted with six 500lb Mk82 bombs.
A unique photo featuring Bell 206B Jet Ranger III, D-HMFA, followed by a NH90TTH.
The IHTC operates six contractor owned civilian registered Bell 206B Jet Ranger IIIs for a period of four years and 15,400 flight hours.
Brand new NH90TTH 78+38 performing a hover over a small lake near Buckeburg airfield.
A unique photo featuring Bell 206B Jet Ranger III, D-HMFA, followed by a NH90TTH.
An NH90TTH during a training mission.
NH90TTH 78+38 flying low over a German forest.
An NH90TTH parked on the flight line at Buckeburg airfield.
A UH-1 Iroquois helicopter assigned to the Aircraft Research and Development Unit.
ETAP-T missions are very varied and include both real and simulated engine running onload/offload operations and combat offloads.
A BAE Systems' test pilot looking less than pleased while having to strike a pose wearing a Striker helmet and visor.
The control desk of a Typhoon cockpit simulator at Warton. Typhoon is being used to demonstrate various technologies under development by BAE Systems for the Tempest project.
Two Chinook HC6s during insertion of UKSF boat teams.
Chinook HC6s during an insertion of special forces.
Retired F-111C A8-132 at RAAF Base Edinburgh in Aircraft Research and Development Unit colours.
Sergeant Tanya Baldwin captures imagery of an F-111 assigned to the Aircraft Research and Development Unit during captive carriage testing of the AGM-142 missile. Sergeant Baldwin was the first female flight test photographer to work for the Aircraft Research and Development Unit whilst at 92 Wing,
To celebrate the 75th anniversary of the formation of the Aircraft Research and Development Unit, three aircraft with a historical link to the unit and still showcasing the unit’s tail-flash took to the skies over Nowra and the Shoalhaven coastline. The formation contained a PC-9/A aircraft currently used by the unit along with a Royal Australian Air Force F/A-18B Hornet and a Douglas Dakota, owned and maintained by the Historical Aircraft Restoration Society based at Albion Park. The ADRU plans, conducts and analyses the results of ground and flight tests of existing and new Air Force aircraft and consists of four flights located at RAAF Bases Edinburgh, Amberley, Richmond and Williamtown, staffed by qualified test pilots, flight test engineers and flight test system specialists.
One of the Aircraft Research and Development Unit's PC-9/As, A23-045, with the 75th anniversary tail markings.
PC-9/A A23-007 over South Australia.
Becoming more and more numerous with the Luftwaffe, the Atlas has proven itself to be a very versatile transport aircraft.
A German Airbus A400M Atlas receives last-minute instructions from a Spanish Combat Control Team from the EADA before conducting a low approach to the dirt runway at the Ablitas airfield.
Some years ago the runway at Ablitas was reinforced and widened in order for the prototype Airbus A400M to undertake some of its certification tests. Since its commissioning, Ejercito del Aire Ala 31 Atlas are frequent visitors here, as are the unit's Hercules.
Both the classes and training organised as part of the ETAP are open to nations outside of the programme. Romania, Bulgaria and Lithuania frequently participate as invited countries.
Zaragoza has not hosted the multinational ETAP-T exercise, which was formerly known as EATT, since 2013.
A C-27J Spartan from 35 Squadron conducted a series of flight trials in conjunction with a PC-9A aircraft from the Aircraft Research and Development Unit in November 2018. The trials involved delivery of static-line parachutes, an important certification activity that prepared Spartans for final operational capability.
The Aeronautica Militare sent one of its Alenia MC-27J Praetorian to Zaragoza. The aircraft is operated by 98 Gruppo/46 Brigatta Aerea based at Pisa-San Giusto.
To celebrate the 75th anniversary of the formation of the Aircraft Research and Development Unit, three aircraft with a historical link to the unit and still showcasing the unit’s tail-flash took to the skies over Nowra and the Shoalhaven coastline. The formation contained a PC-9/A aircraft currently used by the unit along with a Royal Australian Air Force F/A-18B Hornet and a Douglas Dakota, owned and maintained by the Historical Aircraft Restoration Society based at Albion Park. The ADRU plans, conducts and analyses the results of ground and flight tests of existing and new Air Force aircraft and consists of four flights located at RAAF Bases Edinburgh, Amberley, Richmond and Williamtown, staffed by qualified test pilots, flight test engineers and flight test system specialists.
Over the period February 27 to April 14, 2018 members from the Aircraft Research and Development Unit and 33 Squadron deployed to Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Maryland, to undertake clearance testing between the KC-30A and the Poseidon P-8A aircraft. Testing was jointly planned and executed by ARDU and Air Test and Evaluation Squadron 20 (VX-20).
Between June 1 and 13, 2015, the first aerial refuelling trials were conducted between a RAAF KC-30A Multi-Role Tanker Transport and an E-7A Wedgetail Airborne Early Warning and Control aircraft. During the trials, seven sorties were flown by each aircraft and included 118 dry contacts with the KC-30A's refuelling boom, and six wet contacts involving the transfer of 20 tonnes of fuel. The trials were conducted under the direction of the Aircraft Research and Development Unit.
The Arctic is one of the best environments on Earth to train, but is also one of the toughest. Aircrew must remain vigilant at all times. If visibility closes to less than 1,200 metres, aircrew return to base, and when less than 800 metres they must land. For this reason, aircrew carry an emergency Bergen rucksack containing the necessary survival equipment should an emergency landing be required.
An 847 NAS Wildcat taxis back to the ramp at Bardufoss having completed a night time sortie during Clockwork 2019.
The Arctic is a tough environment to work in. Degraded vision operations during exercise Clockwork require high levels of team work as demonstrated here.
Maintenance preparation includes raising the nose wheel to enable Wildcats to operate in deep snow. The struts include a fixed pressure and nitrogen charge to ensure the aircraft sits at a fixed height.
Wildcats completed over 260 flight hours during this year's Clockwork exercise which is an impressive number given the sub-zero ambient temperatures, heavy snow fall and recirculation of snow encountered.
847 NAS deployed four Wildcats to Bardufoss for Exercise Clockwork 2019 during which eleven pilots and five aircrewmen completed ten EQ sorties, the content of which ranged from day navigation and snow landings to tactical night formation sorties operating in two-ships.
Over the period February 27 to April 14, 2018 members from the Aircraft Research and Development Unit and 33 Squadron deployed to Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Maryland, to undertake clearance testing between the KC-30A and the Poseidon P-8A aircraft. Testing was jointly planned and executed by ARDU and Air Test and Evaluation Squadron 20 (VX-20).
Hercules ZH887 was one of the last C5 models remaining in service with 47 Squadron. This specific aircraft, retired during the summer of 2019, was regularly used for special forces training missions, seen here departing the unpaved and rough runway of a special forces training centre in Jordan.
This C-130J-30 Super Hercules was recently handed over to the Armee de I'Air and is operated by ET 02/61 based at BA123 Orleans-Bricy. The first pilots for the French C-130J-30 came from the C-130H, C-160R and CN235 with a minimum of 1,200 to 1,500 flight hours of experience.
Zaragoza has not hosted the multinational ETAP-T exercise, which was formerly known as EATT, since 2013.
A Hercules C5 airdropping an inflatable raiding craft prior to a UKSF para drop.
Royal Air Force Hercules C4 ZH870 is seen here during a tactical landing on the dirt runway at Ablitas airfield.
UKSF commandos parachute from a Hercules C5.
Cargo bay of an Austrian C-130 prepared for a combat offload.
Between June 1 and 13, 2015, the first aerial refuelling trials were conducted between a RAAF KC-30A Multi-Role Tanker Transport and an E-7A Wedgetail Airborne Early Warning and Control aircraft. During the trials, seven sorties were flown by each aircraft and included 118 dry contacts with the KC-30A's refuelling boom, and six wet contacts involving the transfer of 20 tonnes of fuel. The trials were conducted under the direction of the Aircraft Research and Development Unit.
The image shows one vision of the future; a Tempest fighter and a production operative controlling production via a networked tablet.
This futuristic image depicts a factory of the future concept featuring cobots but not many production personnel.