Aeroplane Monthly 1977-01
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When an aircraft made a forced landing away from base, the wheels were placed in the wooden skis shown here to enable the machine to be taken off and flown back to base. The skis would drop clear on take-off. Our contributor made such a retrieval, and then proceeded to the designated bare runway airfield. He adds “had anyone told me that I could land a Harvard, brakes inadvertently left locked, without it going over on its back, I would have sent him to an alienist.’’
North American NA-66 Harvard II AH188, c/n 66-2750, in flight. This machine was taken on strength on November 11, 1940, and survived until October 1, 1960, when it was struck off strength.
A victim of the dreaded over-running, this anonymous Harvard II has escaped with only superficial damage and a bent prop. Doubtless it was soon back in the air.
Two's company! Harvard IIs 2904 and 2547, displaying different schemes according to their vintage. 2547, c/n 66-2280, joined 9 SFTS on October 17, 1940, being struck off on October 1, 1946. It received Cat 8 (beyond repair on site) damage on September 13, 1941. 2904, c/n 66-2637, was taken on strength on February 20, 1941, and passed to the Crown Assets Disposal Corp on October 18, 1960, having received Cat C damage on April 9, 1941.
A Category C (Ground instructional airframe) accident, this time with Canadian-serialled Harvard II 2855 (c/n 66-2588) as the victim. This accident occurred on March 21, 1941, the aircraft only having been taken on strength on February 7! It was struck off strength on October 18, 1960, going to the Crown Assets Disposal Corporation. The complex means of righting the aircraft was later replaced by four airmen lifting the propeller, the descending tail being caught by three or four of their companions.
Canadian-serialled Harvard II 2693 (c/n 66-2426) was taken on strength on November 29, 1940, and turned turtle on July 20, 1941. Although the accident was classed at Cat A, it was written off and struck off on August 4 the same year. The close-up of the cockpit stresses the value of the crash pylon, which was fitted between the pupil’s and instructor's seats.
Harvard II AH197 (c/n 66-2759) reduced to three component parts after a mishap which put it in accident Category A (repairable on site by unit) on April 9, 1941. It seems, however, that Summerside did not repair it, as it was struck off strength on May 23 the same year. It had originally “joined up" on November 5, 1940.