Aeroplane Monthly 1976-07
Aeroplane Monthly 1976-07
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Personal album
De Havilland D.H.9A No 39 Squadron
An unidentified Armstrong Whitworth Siskin IIIDC, fitted with an early variable-pitch propeller, adjustable only on the ground. The IIIDC was a two-seat trainer version of the Siskin fighter and each Siskin Squadron had at least one on strength. This aircraft belonged to 19 Squadron, as evidenced by the blue and white cheques along the fuselage sides.
The Handley Page HP38 J9130 was the prototype Heyford, and is seen at Upper Heyford after an undercarriage collapse on June 10, 1932. It was repaired, only to be destroyed on July 10 when it crashed and burst into flames at North Coates, the crew escaping unharmed.
Fairey Gordon K2639 crashed after meeting a violent down-draught near Semak in 1934. The Gordon, which replaced the Fairey IIIF, was a two-seat day-bomber and general purpose aircraft. It was powered by the Armstrong Siddeley Panther radial, which gave it a better performance than the Napier Lion powered Fairey IIIF. A total of 160 Gordons were built for the RAF, in addition to a number of reconstructed IIIFs. K2639 was a No 14 Squadron aircraft based at Amman.
Capt Stead had to force-land this Fairey Gordon, K2631, after an engine failure at night about 50 miles east of Amman on October 12, 1933. As can be seen in photograph, the undercarriage came right back, just missing the pilot, who was unscathed.
Capt Stead had to force-land this Fairey Gordon, K2631, after an engine failure at night about 50 miles east of Amman on October 12, 1933.
Vickers Virginia VI J7561, Orion, of No 7 Squadron, seen after a cross-wind landing at Worthy Down in 1931. No 7 Squadron, together with No 58, was the first to receive the Virginia in service. These heavy night bombers were powered by two 570 h.p. Napier Lions.
An unidentified Vickers Virginia, seen the morning after a night-time forced landing as a result of engine failure. No one was hurt. The Virginia was the first RAF bomber to be fitted with an automatic pilot. No 7 Squadron gained the distinction of winning the Lawrence Minut Bombing Trophy eight times, and in their time were the RAF's crack bomber squadron.