Air International 1982-10
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E.Heinemann - A veteran designer's Thoughts on Fighters
С турбореактивным двигателем J57-P-8 форсажной тягой 71,17 кН Skylancer мог достичь скорости 1767 км/ч на высоте 3050 м.
The last fighters for the design of which Ed Heinemann was totally responsible were the Douglas F5D Skylancer (on photo) and the F4D Skyray.
Only four F5Ds were flown, two prototypes and the first two of a planned production batch of 60. They eventually were used by NACA for aerodynamic research purposes.
The F5D Skylancer, launched as the F4D-2, eventually evolved as virtually a new aeroplane, with little in common with the Skyray but the basic wing planform.
F5D Skylancer. Вскоре после получения заказа на серийные Skyray компания "Douglas" начала работы над его преемником с ТРД Pratt & Whitney J57, который в конечном итоге стал устанавливаться на обычные F4D. На этом самолете полностью использовали возросшую мощность двигателя, установив более сложное оборудование, расширив всепогодные возможности и увеличив запас топлива. Первоначально самолет получил обозначение F4D-2N. Были заказаны два прототипа, но, учитывая значительное изменение в конструкции (крыло увеличенной площади, удлиненный фюзеляж и более высокий киль), им вскоре присвоили обозначение F5D-1 и имя Skylancer. Первый самолет взлетел в апреле 1956 года, но, поскольку на вооружение уже был принят Vought F8U-1, построили только четыре Skylancer (на снимке). Два самолета позднее использовались НАСА.
The Douglas F5D represented a final attempt by Ed Heinemann to improve on the tailless F4D configuration, featuring an ultra low aspect ratio wing. Only four F5D-1s were built, all being seen in this photograph.
Illustrated here for the first time anywhere is Ed Heinemann 's latest project design for what he describes as a "highly flexible fighter” - a fundamentally simple aeroplane capable of operation across the full fighter spectrum, from both land bases and carriers. The canard layout is compared, below, with the F5D planform, of which it is a logical evolution.
Illustrated here for the first time anywhere is Ed Heinemann 's latest project design for what he describes as a "highly flexible fighter” - a fundamentally simple aeroplane capable of operation across the full fighter spectrum, from both land bases and carriers. The canard layout is compared, below, with the F5D planform, of which it is a logical evolution.
The last fighters for the design of which Ed Heinemann was totally responsible were the Douglas F5D Skylancer and the F4D Skyray (on photo).
More than 400 F4D Skyrays were built for the US Navy and proved the effectiveness of the tailless layout adopted by Ed Heinemann.
Photographs of the F4D-1 (redesignated F-6A in the revised Department of Defense system introduced in June 1962) which shows well the distinctive planform - not so much a delta as a swept back wing of very low aspect ratio.
Douglas F4D-1 (F-6A) Skyray