Air International 2016-02
-
MiG-21 bis serial number 114 returns to the flight line at Graf Ignatievo Air Base home of the 1/3 IAE.
The Fishbed saw three more years of service in Bulgaria than originally planned, but was finally retired on December 31, 2015.
The Tumansky R25-300 turbojet provided 40.20kN (9,038 lbf) dry thrust and 67.20 kN (15,653 lbf) with maximum reheat.
When pitted against US Air Force F-16s and F-15s in TIs, the Fishbed still has some inherent survivability features, such as its low radar cross-section and small size, which combined with suitable camouflage rendered it difficult for visual detection
Critics say the MiG-21 possessed little more than training value, but until late 2015 the BuAF used it for QRA duties.
The Bulgarian Fishbeds participated in their last international exercise in October 2015, were they flew air combat missions with Polish Air Force MiG-29s during a joint Bulgarian-Polish training event at Graf-Ignatievo.
Armament comprised four R-60MK missiles carried on the outboard pylons and two longer range R-13Ms carried inboard.
The MiG-21 bis has a small and cramped cockpit with antiquated instruments. The black-hooded radar display is in the centre.
The Bulgarian Fishbeds participated in their last international exercise in October 2015, were they flew air combat missions with Polish Air Force MiG-29s during a joint Bulgarian-Polish training event at Graf-Ignatievo.
The distinctive ‘flying ti­ger’ tail art of 102 Squadron's aircraft was introduced in 1997. This unit was the last to operate the Skyhawk in Israeli service.
A line of 102 Squadron TA-4Js and an A-4N. Generations of Israeli combat pilots earned their wings and learned to fight on this aircraft, as it was used for the advanced training until its very end.
A-4N 411 of 102 Squadron, at Tel Nof in May 2000 loaded with dummy bombs and underwing fuel tanks.
F-16V 93-0702 in an air-to-air engagement with Lockheed Martin’s F-16D 90-0848 during a test flight from Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base Fort Worth on November 13, 2015.
Lockheed Martin test pilot Paul Randall works through pre-flight checks in the first F-16V 93-0702 at Fort Worth on October 16, 2015.
Lockheed Martin test pilot Paul Randall taxis to take-off in F-16V 93-0702 at Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base Fort Worth on October 16, 2015.
Touch and go.
US Air Force Block 50 F-16C 91-0419 in Lockheed Martin's structural test laboratory at Fort Worth, Texas during durability testing.
The cockpit configuration of the first single-seat F-16V 93-0702.
F-16V 93-0702 in an air-to-air engagement with Lockheed Martin’s F-16D 90-0848 during a test flight from Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base Fort Worth on November 13, 2015.
Dutch NH90 NFH N316 lowers the HELRAS dipper through the funnel.
Bloodhound 700 over the Channel Islands off of the coast of California.
Bloodhound 700 close to the photo ship off of the California Coast during the S-3B Viking's final flight.
A two-ship makes one final break before returning to Point Mugu.
Capt Rousseau bids onlookers a final wave goodbye as Bloodhound 702 departs for the NASA Glenn Research Facility.
The very last US Navy S-3 crew from left to right: Lt Mowle, Lt Cdr Tschanz, Capt Rousseau and Cdr Hanaki.
The crew of Bloodhound 700 at Davis-Monthan after the delivery flight to AMARG from left to right; Lt Cdr Ansley, Cdr Mittag, Lt Melnick and Lt Cdr Welsh.
After signing the aircraft out of US Navy possession the crew receives a receipt.
Lt Cdr Ansley signs S-3B BuNo 160147/700 after handing over the jet to the AMARG.
These production-standard Ansats sport the corporate livery of Russian Helicopters and are used as flying demonstrators of the HEMS and passenger transport versions.
Russia’s Federal Security Service is among the few customers of the fly-by-wire Ansat, operating two machines outfitted for passenger transport.
This is one of the five Ansats built for the Korean Forest Service, the Ansat’s launch customer.
The Ansat-U military derivative has a wheeled undercarriage to train Russian Air and Space Force pilots destined for the Mi-8, Mi-24 and Ka-50, which are all equipped with a tricycle undercarriage.
The Ansat-U's nose with the fairing open to allow access to the avionics boxes for daily inspection and maintenance. All RuASF Ansat-Us are built in a simple configuration without a weather radar.
The civil-certified Ansat’s cockpit is dominated by two displays for system data, with the flight/navigation information displayed on conventional instruments.
The helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) Ansat certified in May 2015 has interior with one or two stretchers and a full set of life-support equipment.
The Chinook’s primary duty in Mali is air transport, but they are also used for ISR missions.
Dropping sling loads is a routine mission; the crews use the Hot Blaze exercise in Spain to practise flying in brown-out conditions.
A330s are used by a range of operators. Low-cost long-haul operator AirAsia X has converted 11 existing A330ceo orders to A330neos, it was announced in January 2016.
A smoother pressure profile on the inboard wing upper surface and a shortened flap track fairing to improve the shock pattern on the mid-board wing have, Airbus says, cut the A330’s drag by 1% in the cruise.
Airbus delivered the first 242-tonne A330 weight variants in 2015. The Incremental Development programme has involved introducing new parts and assembly methods for the aircraft.
Numerous avionics upgrades have been introduced to the A330, including an On-board Airport Navigation System that shows the aircraft's position on a moving map to assist with ground movements.
Cabin modifications on the A330 have included new lighting, an upgraded environmental control system and connectivity options.
The Incremental Development programme has laid the foundations for the A330neo variants, the first of which is due to fly this year.
Four crews are available for the Apaches for missions from Gao.
An RNLAF AH-64D over the River Niger in Mali. The Dutch have three Apaches and three Chinooks in theatre.
Each Apache is armed with two AGM-114 Hellfire missiles mounted under the left wing, along with unguided rockets and a 30mm M230 chain gun with 300 rounds.
The Apaches carry 19 unguided rockets in a pod under the right wing.
There is much more wear of the engines and the dust in Mali sticks more to the helicopters than in Afghanistan, where the Dutch were previously deployed.
A closer look at the Elbit Systems Display and Sight Helmet System (DASH), and the sight sensor attached on the canopy.
F-5s taxi for take-off in Exercise Cope Tiger 2015, each pair of 275 gallon (1,041 litre) drop tanks.
A specially painted 144 Squad­ron F-5 departs for Exercise Cope Tiger 2015.
Engineers load rounds into the 20mm cannon, which according to RSAF pilots is “very stable".
A 144 Squadron F-5T photographed from a US Air Force KC-135R. The F-5 is entering its last years of operation in the RSAF.
The 36th anniversary of 144 Sqn in 2015 was marked by this special livery on the unit's F-5T 853.
F/A-18D BuNo 164001/EX31 currently painted in colours to mark the 70th anniversary of Marine Aviation Logistics Squadron 31 (MALS-31) 'Stingers' based at Beaufort. The squadron provides logistics support, guidance, planning and direction to all of the squadrons assigned to MAG-31.
A line of 102 Squadron TA-4Js and an A-4N. Generations of Israeli combat pilots earned their wings and learned to fight on this aircraft, as it was used for the advanced training until its very end.
Two TA-4J AhitMs lining up on the runway at Hatzerim, for a training mission, in May 2012.
A close-up on the front fuselage of TA-4J 730, taxiing at Hatzerim. Right of the Israeli markings is the word Meshopar, which means Improved, signifying that this was one of the aircraft that received the AhitM upgrade in the 2000s.
Israeli A-4s were deployed in combat on numerous times during their service career, ranging from the Yom Kippur War in 1973 to the second Lebanon War in 2006.
KC-130J BuNo 168065/QD065 under the night sky at Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni after an evening mission.
Four Sumos on the ramp at Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, Japan.
VMGR-152's unit insignia is painted on all of its KC-130Js.
Green screens. The KC-130J and all other models of the C-130J are fitted with a glass cockpit comprising numerous glass screens and control panels.
'Sumo 45 Flight' in formation over Japan with Capt Benoit Bordelon (left seat) and Maj Andre Jonkheere (right seat) at the controls.