Air Pictorial 1988-02
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G.Napper - Lavi - Israel's TSR-2?
The Lavi (second prototype) made its first in-flight refuelling test on 15th June 1987 from an Israeli A.F. McDonnell Douglas A-4 Skyhawk
The Lavi B-1 and B-2 prototypes in formation with an Israel Aircraft Industries Kfir-TC2 chase plane (Israeli A.F. No. 308). The Lavi's small size is evident; although its span is 2 ft. more than the two-seat Kfir’s, its length is 6 ft. greater
The first Lavi prototype soon after its roll-out on 21 st July 1986
The Lavi second prototype which first flew on 30th March 1987. B-2 used the same engine as B-1 (which first flew on 31st December 1986), after repair work to foreign object damage to the low-pressure compressor
The Lavi first prototype on its second test flight, 8th January 1987
Although heavily financed by U.S. aid and despite many American contractors, the Lavi remained an Israeli-designed and supervised project, crammed with Israeli avionics and powered by a modified Pratt & Whitney PW1120, built under licence by Beit Shemesh Engines
Apparent in this view of the Lavi is its arrowhead-shaped wing blended into the area-ruled fuselage
The Lavi B-1 and B-2 prototypes in formation with an Israel Aircraft Industries Kfir-TC2 chase plane (Israeli A.F. No. 308). The Lavi's small size is evident; although its span is 2 ft. more than the two-seat Kfir’s, its length is 6 ft. greater
The Lavi (second prototype) made its first in-flight refuelling test on 15th June 1987 from an Israeli A.F. McDonnell Douglas A-4 Skyhawk
The Elta EL/M2035 multi-mode radar intended for the Lavi. Air-to-air and air-to-ground modes are featured in the design
Mock-up of the Lavi's cockpit which was designed to minimise the pilot's workload. Visible are the HUD collimator, two large monochrome CRT displays, with conventional flight instruments below and engine instruments to the left
Full-scale mock-up of the Lavi which, when unveiled, revealed certain similarities to the General Dynamics F-16B/D, al­though the flying surfaces are very different