Aeroplane Monthly 1992-07
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W.Morse - Baynes: the unknown innovator
The newly-completed Baynes Bee at Heston on March 23, 1937, with a more conventional two-seater - a Miles Hawk Major behind. A few days later, on April 3, Hubert Broad took the Bee off from Heston on its maiden flight. Although it was registered G-AEWC, it is almost certain that the Bee never wore these marks.
Another neat Baynes innovation was the Bee's swivelling wing, which could be rotated 90 deg. to enable it to rest on top of and in line with the fuselage.
Two views of the Bee showing the excellent field of vision for the pilot. The narrow-track undercarriage must have made the Bee prone to groundlooping, despite the steerable tailskid.
The newly-completed Baynes Bee at Heston on March 23, 1937, with a more conventional two-seater - a Miles Hawk Major behind. A few days later, on April 3, Hubert Broad took the Bee off from Heston on its maiden flight. Although it was registered G-AEWC, it is almost certain that the Bee never wore these marks.
The main features of the Carden-Baynes S.P.1 engines and of their installation in the wing of the Bee are revealed in this sketch. The mountings are steel girder structures with sandwich plates between the cylinder block and sump casting. The engine and radiators (which lay alongside) were entirely submerged in the wing - the extension shafts for the propellers were integral with the engines. By mounting the engines on their sides, the wing was free of any protuberances.
Baynes Bee. Two 40 h.p. Carden-Baynes S.p.1 engines.