Flight 1924-01
Flight
A Flying "Pigeon Loft'': This Junkers monoplane has been converted by a Belgian company for carrying pigeons, the Belgians being fond of pigeon races.
The Curtiss night bomber: A large number of these machines (over 90) were built for the U.S. Air Service during the summer of 1923. The N.B.S.1, as it is called, is a twin-engined biplane on the lines of the Martin bomber. It possesses, however, several important modifications, principally in the position of the two Liberty engines and in the strengthening of the fuselage. As will be seen, the wings can be folded back, and when folded the outer extensions are rigidly supported by means of auxiliary struts at the hinge.
The Sesefsky biplane: A reconnaissance machine, designed by Eng. S. Sesefsky, Director of Civil Aviation in Roumania.
Sesefsky Biplane 250 hp Astra-Benz
A SUCCESSFUL FRENCH HELICOPTER: Helicopter, which recently accomplished vertical and horizontal flights at Les Breuils. It covered a circular course, returning to its starting point at a height of from 10 to 15 ft.
A SUCCESSFUL FRENCH HELICOPTER: M. Oehmichen seated in his helicopter, which recently accomplished vertical and horizontal flights at Les Breuils. It covered a circular course, returning to its starting point at a height of from 10 to 15 ft.
AN UNORTHODOX SEAPLANE: The Gallaudet D.4, as used by the U.S. Naval Air Service. The outstanding feature of this machine is that the engine - a 400 h.p. Liberty - is located inside the fuselage (between the planes) and drives through an ingenious system of gearing a propeller mounted on, and "dividing," the fuselage itself. This machine has a span of 46 ft. 4 ins. and an overall length of 33 ft. 5 ins., its speed being 126 m.p.h.
THE FIRST MID-AIR CONTACT BETWEEN AIRSHIP AND AEROPLANE: On September 18 last, Lieut. R. K. Stoner, flying a Sperry "Messenger," maintained contact with the U.S. Army Blimp Airship, "D.3," for about one minute over Langley Field.
A Christmas Greeting from Canada: This photograph is from a Christmas card sent us by the Laurentide Air Service, Ltd., of Montreal. The machines on the ice are a Martinsyde and a Westland.
A Christmas Greeting from Canada: This photograph is from a Christmas card sent us by the Laurentide Air Service, Ltd., of Montreal. The machines on the ice are a Martinsyde and a Westland.
THE NORDMAN MONOPLANE GLIDER: This view shows the machine just before making a flight at the Belleclaire County Club at Bayside, L.I. The pilot is Mr. Arthur Heinrich.
Two views of the Nordman glider in flight.
The Nordman glider: Major William N. Hensley, CO. of Mitchel Field, congratulating Mr. Nordman on his successful machine. Note the Henderson motor-cycle used for towing in preliminary tests.
THE COX-KLEMIN C.K.2: A two-seater side-by-side training 'plane built for the U.S. Army Air Service, is fitted with a Wright model E 190 h.p. engine.
Sketch of the Darmstadt "Konsul" in flight.
Darmstadt "Konsul" Glider
THE MARK R.V/23 MONOPLANE: Side view
THE MARK R.V/23 MONOPLANE: Three-quarter Rear view.
Mark R.V/23 Monoplane 100 hp Mercedes Engine
A BELGIAN LIGHT 'PLANE: The Cambier monoplane has a thin-section, wire-braced monoplane wing, and is fitted with a 16 h.p. Sergant engine. Three-quarter front view. Standing in front of the machine are M. Rooms, the pilot, and M. Cambier, the constructor.
The Cambier Monoplane: M. Rooms in the pilot's cockpit
THE MAGNAN MONOPLANE GLIDER: Side view.
THE MAGNAN MONOPLANE GLIDER: Three-quarter rear view of machine in skeleton.
Magnan Glider Type M2