Aeroplane Monthly 1983-02
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R.Silvester - Percival Aircraft 1933-1954 (2)
G-AEYE, the prototype Q.6 flying near Luton in 1937. It made its first flight from there on September 14, 1937 in the hands of its designer.
The first and last. In the foreground, G-AFAA, the last Mew Gull built; in the background the prototype Q.6 G-AEYE, seen at Hayes in 1939.
This trio of Q.6s includes the prototype, G-AEYE, leading the formation, G-AFFD and YI-ROH.
Q.6 YI-ROH, Bird of Eden, was sold to King Ghazi of Iraq.
First Q.6 fitted with a retractable under­carriage was VH-ABL. It was not delivered to Australia and instead was registered G-AFMT and sold to Vickers Armstrongs Ltd.
Four Percival Q.6s had retractable undercarriages. One was VH-ABY, seen here during a high speed flypast at Luton.
One of seven Q.6s built to Air Ministry Contract was P5636. Other civil Q.6s were im­pressed into RAF service on the outbreak of the war.
The Q.6 production line at Luton in 1937.
The Q.6's cockpit, fully equipped for blind flying and featuring a swing-over control column.
This cut­away drawing of the Q.6 appeared in The Aero­plane of December 22, 1937.
Percival Mew Gull G-AEXF photographed near Old Warden in June 1978 by AIK PORTRAITS
The original prototype Mew Gull, G-ACND, at Gravesend in March 1934.
Bearing the same registration letters, is the E.2 Mew Gull, an entirely new aeroplane that appeared in 1935.
View of the Mew Gull G-AEKL. This aircraft was rebuilt after a ground collision with a Hawker Hart at Speke and was finally destroyed by German bombing of Lympne in June 1940.
View of the Mew Gull G-AEKL. This aircraft was rebuilt after a ground collision with a Hawker Hart at Speke and was finally destroyed by German bombing of Lympne in June 1940.
Mr. A. Henshaw taxies his Mew Gull (a la racehorse) up to the line at Ronaldsway. He made fastest time in this machine, which was flown (with v.p. airscrew) by Major Miller in the South Africa race.
Mew Gull, seen here in its original form before modifications by Jack Cross of Essex Aero turned it into a different aeroplane.
Mew Gull G-AFAA was the sixth and last of its type built. Designated Type E.3H it had a smaller wing, smaller tail areas, a narrower fuselage and was powered by a 205 h.p. D.H. Gipsy Six Series II engine. Built in 1937 the aircraft was burnt at Luton on July 7, 1945.
The first and last. In the foreground, G-AFAA, the last Mew Gull built; in the background the prototype Q.6 G-AEYE, seen at Hayes in 1939.
The oxide-finished E.3H Mew Gull, later G-AFAA, in early 1937.
Capt Edgar Percival, hat and all, seated in Mew Gull G-AFAA.