Air International 1985-06
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??? - A320: Third Generation Airbus
While European governments struggled during the mid-'seventies to agree a format within which their respective aircraft manufacturers could work together on large civil aircraft, several companies actively promoted derivatives of existing designs, such as the Dassault-Breguet Mercure 200
The simple, functional layout of the A320 flight deck is well shown here, with six large CRTs providing all essential information for flight management, and side stick controllers contributing to the uncluttered appearance.
This view in the recently completed full cabin mock-up at Toulouse gives some impression of the spaciousness achieved by careful design of side panels and overhead bins.
A fully representative A320 model, with the final leading- and trailing-edge devices, in the Weybridge 13 ft by 9 ft (3,96 by 2,74 m) wind tunnel.
The ultimate Weybridge-designed wing for the A320 (known as W6-4) is seen here on test in the ARA high speed tunnel at Bedford in 1983. Meeting increased performance targets set by Airbus Industrie, this wing was the outcome of an extensive wing research programme started by BAC in 1970 and continued by BAe.
British Caledonian will be among the first three airlines to operate the A320, and has specified CFM56 engines.
Airbus Industrie A320
One of the Europlane projects of mid-1973, based on two RB.211 engines and a wide body. This tri-national study eventually concentrated on a larger aircraft than today's A320, for that portion of the market now covered by the A310.
One of the several studies by the Anglo-German CAST in 1974. Wide and narrow body types were examined, with two or three engines, and 150-195 seats.
Another of the companies that tried to "go it alone" in the mid-'seventies was Aerospatiale, with its family of AS-200 projects including a 150-seat twin.
Another of the companies that tried to "go it alone" in the mid-'seventies was Aerospatiale, with its family of AS-200 projects. This formed the basis for the tri-national JET studies (such as the JET-2 shown), from which the A320 has evolved directly.
While European governments struggled during the mid-'seventies to agree a format within which their respective aircraft manufacturers could work together on large civil aircraft, several companies actively promoted derivatives of existing designs, such as the BAC X-11.