Air International 2015-08
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The Mi-8T is a real workhorse in the extreme cold of Russia’s far northern territories and Siberia.
The Russian Air Force still operates around 100 Mi-8T/Ps, and a significant proportion are used for training at Syzran.
More than 600 Mi-8T/Ps are in commercial use in Russia, with another 100 held in storage that could be re-introduced following refurbishment.
This Mi-8T is operated by the Flight Research Institute at Zhukovsky for search and rescue and various research initiatives.
Most of the Mi-8T’s commercial operators in Russia, such as Karelia, are compelled to keep their old Mi-8Ts in service for as long as possible.
PANH, which operates this Mi-8T, believes there is still plenty of life remaining in its Mi-8T fleet.
Krasnodar-based PANH is among the largest operators of the Mi-8T in Russia, which uses the type for a wide variety of utility roles.
The Mi-8MSB is a re-engined derivative of the basic Mi-8T offered by Motor Sich of Ukraine with increased hot-and-high performance, range and payload, but no avionics and instrumentation improvements.
Thirteen Mi-8MSBs have been ordered by Ukraine’s military and national guard for tactical transport.
The Slovakian company Techmont uses Mi-8T/P OM-XYC for a range of specialist transport services, including moving pipes.
Only a handful of 'classic' Mi-8s are used by commercial operators in Europe. Most are operated by Heli Air of Bulgaria supporting UN humanitarian operations in Sudan and South Sudan.
The 1960s-era rotor blades on the Mi-8T/P are restricted to 3,000 hours or ten years’ service, making them a focus area in any future upgrade.
The Mi-8’s spacious stand-up cabin can accommodate up to 24 passenger seats or bulky cargo.
Four Russian Air Force Su-30SMs from the 4th Air Crew Conversion and Military Evaluation Centre at Lipetsk took part in the flying display.
Another public debut appearance at Army 2015 was made by Russian Naval Aviation's Su-30SM.
Su-35S Flanker-E, serial number RF-95477 with side number 34, lands at Kubinka fitted with numerous missile launchers and pylons, but devoid of any air-to-air missiles.
NASA DC-8-72 N817NA at Keflavik, Iceland, in May 2015 for the polar winds research flights.
NASA DC-8-72 (N817NA) at Keflavik, Iceland, in May 2015 for the polar winds research flights.
The DC-8’s JT3D turbofans were replaced by these CFM56s in 1986 following its acquisition by NASA.
Wing-mounted sensors.
Some 100 small tube-shaped dropsondes were dispensed in-flight during the Iceland mission to obtain vertical wind profiles and transmit information on air temperature and moisture.
After being dropped through the fuselage from around 19,000ft (5,800m), the dropsondes transmit data for up to 12 minutes.
Some scientific instrumentation is loaded onto the aircraft by using openings in the outer skin or replacing windows with plugs containing sensors.
The DC-8-72 worked alongside the German Aerospace Center's Falcon for the polar winds research flights.
Despite its age and analogue cockpit, NASA research pilot Wayne Ringelberg praised the DC-8-72's solidity and performance.
Two or three scientists are allocated to each experiment aboard - and close co-ordination is required with the flight crew to plan flight operations that are both safe and meet scientists’ requirements.
Around 25 people can be carried in the very spacious cabin, where wide vintage first class seats are surrounded by equipment racks.
Block 40 F-16C 90-0022 from 182 Filo part of 8nci AJU based at Diyarbakir Air Base takes off from Konya armed with an AIM-9X missile on station 2.
Konya Air Base has a large ‘S-shaped’ flight line shown here full of Turkish Air Force F-16s during Exercise Anatolian
These two Block 50 F-16Cs, 93-0672 and 93-0673, are assigned to the Turkish Air Force aggressor squadron, 131 Filo, part of the 3ncu AJEU at Konya. In the background is Block 40 F-16D 92-0022 from 162 Filo and Block 50+ F-16Cs 07-1014 and 07-1019 from 161 Filo - all are based at Bandirma Air Base with the 6nci AJU.
Block 50+ F-16C 07-1007 from 161 Filo takes off from Konya Air Base fitted with conformal fuel tanks and carrying an FPR advanced ACMI pod on station 11.3 Block 40 F-16C 90-0022 from 182 Filo part of 8nci AJU based at Diyarbakir Air Base takes off from Konya armed with an AIM-9X missile on station 2.
These two Block 50 F-16Cs, 93-0672 and 93-0673, are assigned to the Turkish Air Force aggressor squadron, 131 Filo, part of the 3ncu AJEU at Konya. In the background is Block 40 F-16D 92-0022 from 162 Filo and Block 50+ F-16Cs 07-1014 and 07-1019 from 161 Filo - all are based at Bandirma Air Base with the 6nci AJU.
Konya Air Base has a large ‘S-shaped’ flight line shown here full of Turkish Air Force F-16s during Exercise Anatolian
The Tu-95MS' circular-section fuselage has a 2.9m diameter, and can accomodate a six-unit rotary launcher for Kh-55, Kh-55SM and Kh-555 missiles.
The Tu-95MS is maintenance-heavy, especially given the complex engine's counter-rotating propellers, designed for high efficiency, extended range and high cruise speed.
Low utilisation until the mid-2000s means the RuAF still regards the Bear as having used little fatigue life, with minimal corrosion damage.
The current serviceability rate of the Tu-95MS fleet is around 50%, with plans to increase it to 75% by 2020 thanks to overhaul and the improved supply of spare parts and serviceable engines.
This aircraft, serial Red 10 and named 'Samara', is among the first Bear-Hs upgraded to the Tu-95MSM standard, with the aircraft capable of deploying then Kh-101/Kh-102 ultra-long range ALCMs carried on large APU-5M twin-round pylon under the wings.
The Engels-based Bear-H force includes 13 Tu-95MS-16s, capable of carrying 16 ALCMs plus five more Tu-95MS-6s, outfitted for six nuclear-tipped ALCMs.
The Tu-95MS upgrade and life extension will enable the bomber to be capable of soldiering on in the nuclear deterrence and long-range conventional strike roles until 2035 or even 2040.
The Tu-95MS is the principal aircraft used by the Russian Air Force for high-profile 'show of force' patrols.
A Tu-95MS Bear-H approaches an Il-78M Midas for fuel. The global 'power projection' missions are performed with one or two refuellings; a record-breaking flight of 42 hours and 20 minutes in July 2010 involved four.
A Kh-555 ALCM carried on a rotary launcher.
The Tu-95MS is the principal aircraft used by the Russian Air Force for high-profile 'show of force' patrols.
Departure Planning Information software issues real-time progress updates from when an aircraft is cleared for pushback, to when it’s taxiing and when it has taken off.
This Ka-31R ‘91’ was the second example of this version to be delivered. Its permanent base will be the Severomorsk-1 airfield.
The 61° Stormo FT-339CD flight line. This type is operated by 213° Gruppo for training phase 2 and 3 and by 212° Gruppo for training phase 4, but in the near future it will be used only by 213° Gruppo.
Above the Apulian coast, a formation of all three types in service with 61° Stormo: the T-339A, FT-339CD and T-346A.
The Katran retains the Ka-52's 220kg (485lb) GOES-451 electro-optical turret.
4 Due to its shorter wing, the Ka-52K has only four weapons hardpoints rather than the Ka-52’s six.
The Ka-52K’s wing folds aft, with the hinge on the trailing edge near the weapons pylon.
A Tu-95MS Bear-H approaches an Il-78M Midas for fuel. The global 'power projection' missions are performed with one or two refuellings; a record-breaking flight of 42 hours and 20 minutes in July 2010 involved four.
A Russian Air Force Su-34 Fullback in the type’s distinctive three-tone blue colour scheme lands at Kubinka. The aircraft is assigned to the 4th Air Crew Conversion and Military Evaluation Centre at Lipetsk.
Two T-346As from 212° Gruppo perform aerobatic manoeuvres above Apulia. By the end of the year, the squadron will operate six examples of this aircraft.
The first Italian Air Force training course on the T-346A is scheduled to start at Lecce in August 2015; on qualifying the four students are destined for the F-2000.
The first Italian Air Force training course on the T-346A is scheduled to start at Lecce in August 2015; on qualifying the four students are destined for the F-2000.
Four 212° Gruppo T-346As overfly Decimomannu at the end of their first deployment for air-to-ground and air-to-air training this spring.
Above the Apulian coast, a formation of all three types in service with 61° Stormo: the T-339A, FT-339CD and T-346A.
A T-346A lands at Decimomannu after an air-to-ground training sortie carrying a BRD pod used to deliver training rockets and bomblets.
A new badge was adopted by 610 Stormo on May 10, 2015. Seen here on a T-346A, it features an eagle in black and is considered more representative of the wing’s 'fighter school' orientation than the earlier badge.
A T-346A during the last pre take-off checks, inside one of the new ‘soft shelter’ hangars at Lecce built for the new trainer.
The Alenia Aermacchi T-346A full motion simulator inside the new 212° Gruppo building at Lecce Air Base.
The control console station of the T-346 full mission simulator.
The Ground Based Training System incorporates nine simulator based training stations, which allow the student to ‘fly’ the T-346A without time limits until to boost their knowledge all the aircraft systems and avionics.
The busy airspace in the southeast of the UK, with London Heathrow running at 98% capacity, brings a sharp focus on new technologies that improve efficiency.
The CN235-200 and CN235-300 are gradually replacing the Transall in French service, taking a leading role in the utility, tactical airlift, medical evacuation and paradropping roles.
Eight patients can be carried in the CN235, and the aircraft’s ability to land on and take off from semi-prepared runways means it can take casualties direct to medical facilities from austere locations.
The CN235-300 cockpit's flight management systems offer global navigation satellite system capability and an enhanced ground proximity warning system with a 3D database.
The DC-8-72 worked alongside the German Aerospace Center's Falcon for the polar winds research flights.
Ensign Moral and Major Lagos board an F-5M prior to an air-to-air training mission with other aircraft from the unit.
The last phase of fighter pilot training at Talavera is usually dedicated to air-to-air and air-to-ground missions.
Three F-5Ms taxi to the runway at Torrejon Air Base near Madrid to take part in a flypast. Equipped with modern avionics, the F-5M is a capable aircraft for students to fly and transition to combat units.
Exchanges and exercises with the Royal Moroccan Air Force take place every year. An F-5M waits at the runway threshold along with a Moroccan F-5E during Exercise NAVIMAES.
Talavera Air Base shares its runway with a civilian airport.
Training missions flown by Ala 23 from Talavera last a little over an hour, although air-to-air sorties are shorter due to the greater use of afterburner during manoeuvring.
This experimental colour scheme was applied to F-5 AE9-027 in 2007, probably to simulate the profile of an F-18 Hornet during an air defence exercise. The scheme was soon abandoned.
An F-5M from the Ala 23 returns to Talavera following an air-to-air mission with a Eurofighter from Ala 11 at Moron.
F-5B serial number AE9-10 was the prototype for a structural modernisation programme undertaken by Israel Aircraft Industries and CASA. It is shown returning from its first test flight, having yet to receive a grey paint scheme.
Russian Naval Aviation’s MiG-29KR made its public debut at Army 2015.
T-50 PAK FA, side number 054, carrying two R-77 air-to-air missiles.
Exchanges and exercises with the Royal Moroccan Air Force take place every year. An F-5M waits at the runway threshold along with a Moroccan F-5E during Exercise NAVIMAES.
A Royal Moroccan Air Force F-5F taxies to the active runway during an exchange with Ala 23 at Talavera.
Students undertake a minimum of 36 hours in this simulator during the fighter course.
The new derivatives of the Mi-8/Mi-17/Mi-171, such as this UTair Mi-8AMT, are more expensive than the Mi-8T/P in price and direct operating costs. Most, if not all, existing Mi-8T operators do not see them as direct replacements.
A digital Selex ES SAGE airborne electronic warfare system passively collects emitter data from radio frequency sources.
In June 2015 the Camcopter demonstrated three sensors to the Royal Australian Navy and Australian Government.
Two S-100s are currently deployed on the Migrant Offshore Aid Station’s Phoenix, giving the ship dedicated airborne sup­port for its rescue missions.
An F-5M from the Ala 23 returns to Talavera following an air-to-air mission with a Eurofighter from Ala 11 at Moron.
The DA62 features a large ventral strake, dorsal fillet, and turned-down tailplane tips.
The engines are 180hp (134kW), 2-litre, liquid-cooled four-cylinder Austro Engine AE330 turbocharged diesels, fitted with three-blade constant speed, fully-feathering MT composite propellers.
The DA62 will be offered as either a five- or seven-seater, with the seats in either a two-three or a two-three-two arrangement.
The main doors do not completely cover the wheels when the undercarriage is retracted.
Access to the cabin is good as each pilot has their own door, and there are recessed grab handles above the instrument panel.
The wings feature sensibly sized non-slip wing-root walkways.
The engine nacelles are extremely elegant, even the exhausts feature sculpted fairings.
The panel is dominated by the Garmin G1000’s dual multifunction display (MFD) screens, with back-up instrumentation supplied by an electronic standby attitude indicator that includes airspeed and altitude. Control sticks are unusual for a seven-seat twin; the pilot’s carries rocker switches for electric pitch trim along with push-to-talk and autopilot disconnect buttons. The power levers are in the centre console.
Ingress to the rear seats is via a big gull-wing door on the port side. Well located grab handles built into the roof interior make getting in and out of the back seats easy. The backs of the middle seats fold forwards to provide access to the rear seats.