Aviation Historian 6
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B.Lindwall - Mosquito vs Bull: Fliying the J 30 in Flygvapnet service
Бомбардировщики Ту-4 стали первыми носителями советских ядерных бомб
The Soviet Union's Tupolev Tu-4 Bull was an unprecedented piece of "reverse-engineering”, the result of a massive undertaking to clone Boeing’s B-29 Superfortress after three examples of the latter had made forced landings in the Soviet Far East in 1944. Although the two types looked identical, their construction was completely different, the Soviets using the metric system rather than the imperial system the bomber had been designed in. This caused severe challenges with basics like aluminium sheet thicknesses. Russian determination was never in doubt, however, and more than 800 examples were built.
Three J 30s alongside a Flygvapnet Junkers Ju 86K (designated B 3 in Swedish service). Three B 3Ds were converted to serve as radar operator trainers in 1949, one of which was fitted with the complete nose section of written-off Mosquito s/n 30006.
A Flygvapnet J 30 crew in discussion with a mechanic. Bengt Lindwall, nicknamed “Kavlinge” after his place of birth, flew the Mosquito and the de Havilland Venom in service before taking up a career as a civilian pilot. He retired from Lufthansa in 1992, after more than four decades as a professional pilot.
Three J 30s alongside a Flygvapnet Junkers Ju 86K (designated B 3 in Swedish service). Three B 3Ds were converted to serve as radar operator trainers in 1949, one of which was fitted with the complete nose section of written-off Mosquito s/n 30006.
Photographed at Hatfield before delivery in early 1949, these Mosquitoes have their original RAF serials applied beneath the last two digits of their Swedish serials. The nearest here is TA353, which did not serve operationally with the RAF, becoming 30020 in Flygvapnet service. Code letters were added to the fin in Sweden.
Another of the pre-delivery photographs of a J 30 in flight. Despite its problems in Flygvapnet service, the “wooden wonder” was well-liked by its crews for its turn of speed and agility.
The view from the office - No 2 Sqn’s “Blue K” over a typically snowy landscape. The J 30’s centimetric radar was a great improvement on early metric radar, which was non-directional and suffered from ground “clutter”. Centimetric radar allowed greater range and a much improved ability to track rapidly-moving targets.