Aviation Historian 08
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K.Brookes - Merlin Magic at Farnborough
Fairey Fulmar N1854/G-AIBE at Farnborough in 1962;
Fairey Fulmar N1854 was the first production example and made its first flight in January 1940, after which it was used for trials, including deck landing trials aboard HMS Illustrious. After the war it was returned to Fairey and registered G-AIBE. In 1972 it was presented to the Fleet Air Arm Museum, where it resides today as a static exhibit.
Ken Brookes's superb image of de Havilland Mosquito T.3 TW117 and Fairey Fulmar N1854 on the runway at Farnborough on September 7, 1962. Built at Leavesden in May 1946, TW117 was put into storage, where it remained until July 1947. After serving with various second-line units, it was put into storage again in April 1954, where it remained until March 1960, when it joined No 3 Civilian Anti-Aircraft Co-operation Unit at Exeter Airport. Coded “Z”, the Mosquito was still serving with No 3 CAACU when it was flown by John Oliver as part of the vintage display at Farnborough in 1962. It was retired and handed over to the RAF Museum Collection in June 1963, and was used for the filming of 633 Squadron at Bovingdon the following month. It was subsequently put on display at the RAF Museum at Hendon, before moving to the Norwegian Air Force Museum in Oslo, where it is currently on display.
Ken Brookes's superb image of de Havilland Mosquito T.3 TW117 and Fairey Fulmar N1854 on the runway at Farnborough on September 7, 1962. Built at Leavesden in May 1946, TW117 was put into storage, where it remained until July 1947. After serving with various second-line units, it was put into storage again in April 1954, where it remained until March 1960, when it joined No 3 Civilian Anti-Aircraft Co-operation Unit at Exeter Airport. Coded “Z”, the Mosquito was still serving with No 3 CAACU when it was flown by John Oliver as part of the vintage display at Farnborough in 1962. It was retired and handed over to the RAF Museum Collection in June 1963, and was used for the filming of 633 Squadron at Bovingdon the following month. It was subsequently put on display at the RAF Museum at Hendon, before moving to the Norwegian Air Force Museum in Oslo, where it is currently on display.