Dewoitine D.7
Страна: Франция
Год: 1923


Описание:
Flight, August 1923
THE VAUVILLE LIGHT 'PLANE AND GLIDER MEETING
Flight, December 1924
The Paris Aero Show 1924
Фотографии

Flight, August 1923

THE VAUVILLE LIGHT 'PLANE AND GLIDER MEETING
No Remarkable Performances Yet

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  Concerning the two Dewoitine power-driven machines our correspondent says: "There are at present two Dewoitine light 'planes here, one with a Vaslin engine and one with a Salmson. The Vaslin is a four-cylinder horizontal engine. It looks rather heavy, and has a common head to the two cylinders on each side. It has overhead valves, and is otherwise normal as far as can be seen. The Salmson is a three-cylinder Y-type, and is quite a pretty job. It is probably lighter than the Vaslin, and both engines apparently give about 15 h.p. at the speed at which they are run. Both engines start up easily, and seem to run very smoothly. On Sunday afternoon Descamps brought out the Vaslin-Dewoitine, and made a very pretty flight of some 15 minutes. On landing, however, for some reason the machine swerved and charged a shed, slightly damaging a wing. Barbot then took out the Salmson-Dewoitine, and made a couple of circuits."
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Flight, December 1924

The Paris Aero Show 1924

CONSTRUCTIONS AERONAUTIQUES E. DEWOITINE

  A COMPARATIVE newcomer to the French aircraft industry M. E. Dewoitine, whose experimental works and offices are now at Chatillon-sous-Bagneux (Seine), while the original works at Toulouse are devoted to quantity production, is rapidly gaining a leading position among French aircraft designers. Probably the first introduction of M. Dewoitine to readers of FLIGHT dates back to the 1920 Paris aero show, when a scale model of the Dewoitine twin-engined commercial monoplane was shown. Incidentally the same machine is, we understand, being produced as a night bomber. At this year's Paris Show M. Dewoitine is showing four machines, two of which are of the D.1 C.1 type, while the third is the D.7 light monoplane, and the fourth a large commercial monoplane.
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  The last machine on the Dewoitine stand is the little light monoplane, the type D.7, which is similar to that used by Barbot in his cross-Channel flight, with the exception that a new Vaslin engine has been fitted. This is a six-cylinder in line, water-cooled, of 2 litres capacity. The engine is stated to weigh 62 kgs. (136 1/2 lbs.) without propeller and radiator, but including oil, and to develop 35 h.p. at 2,200 r.p.m. and 55 h.p. at 3,000 r.p.m. The machine is, of course, a single-seater, and we learn that in small quantities the price is 35,000 fr. (approximately ?430 at present rate of exchange). If ordered in larger quantities the price is expected to be reduced to about 20,000 fr. (?250). It is not proposed at present to give a very detailed description of this machine, as we hope to return to it in a subsequent issue. The performance claimed for it is extraordinarily good, and is somewhat difficult to believe. A top speed of 150 km./hr. (94 m.p.h.) is claimed, and a landing speed of 30 km./hr. (18| m.p.h.). Neither figure seems probable, the latter because the wing loading is about 4 lbs./sq. ft. and the former because the wing section employed is of the Joukowsky or "tadpole" type. The Vaslin engine is, however, very interesting, and we hope to give a detailed description of it at an early date.
THE DEWOITINE LIGHT 'PLANE: This is the machine on which M. Barbot has been flying recently at Toulouse.
Two more Dewoitines: In the foreground the light monoplane with 6-cylinder Vaslin engine, and behind it the D.1 single-seater fighter all-metal monoplane with 300 h.p. Hispano-Suiza.
SOME DEWOITINE DETAILS: On the left is shown the manner in which the famous French designer solves the problem of a detachable cantilever tail plane spar, and on the right the nose of the Dewoitine light monoplane, with six-cylinder Vaslin water-cooled engine. The cowling over the engine has been omitted. Note the nose radiator.
LIGHT 'PLANE FROM VAUVILLE: A power-driven Dewoitine.