Air International 1984-02
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??? - Some talk of Alexander /Warbirds/ (2)
The Lysander III was externally similar to the Mk I, with a number of small improvements; this example is in the markings of No 2 Squadron.
Many Lysanders were eventually converted to serve as target-tugs.for which purpose the target sleeve was carried in a ventral pod. The last 100 production aircraft were also built to TT Mk IIIA standard, one of these being illustrated.
Starting in July 1940, Lysanders were adapted to serve in the air-sea rescue role, eventually equipping four full squadrons for this duly. The ASR Lysanders carried survival packs on the stub wings and flares or smoke bombs under the rear fuselage. The example shown carries No 277 Squadron markings.
A Lysander II serving with No 6 Squadron in the Middle East, where it was lost at the end of 1941.
For clandestine operations behind enemy lines - principally from the UK but also in the Middle and Far East - the Lysander III (SD) had a long-range tank, an access ladder to the rear cockpit and a matt black finish.
Starting in July 1940, Lysanders were adapted to serve in the air-sea rescue role, eventually equipping four full squadrons for this duly. The ASR Lysanders carried survival packs on the stub wings and flares or smoke bombs under the rear fuselage. The example shown carries No 277 Squadron markings.
Serving with No 20 Squadron in India, DG445 was one of only six Canadian-built Lysander IIs to enter service with the RAF.
A Canadian-built Lysander Mk II in 1942; note the absence of a spinner and additional air intake (presumably for cabin heating) on the port side of the cowling.
A British-built Lysander III serving with the RCAF in Canada, where it was converted to a target-tug.
Lysander II serial 460 was the Canadian target-towing prototype.
Five of the six Lysander IIs that were supplied to the Irish Army Air Corps in July 1939; two were later converted to target-tugs and served until 1946
The sole Lysander II built under contract for the Armee de l’Air in 1939; it crashed before delivery.
Lysander II P9134 was among two dozen or so transferred to the Free French Air Force in North Africa in 1941.
Lysanders supplied to Finland included four Mk Is and nine Mk IIIs. They were modified after delivery to operate from snow and frozen lake surfaces, with a ski installation of local design. Some, as shown here, acquired an overall white finish.
The sole Canadian Lysander with skis - a noticeably different design from the Finnish ski version.
From RAF stocks, Portugal received eight Lysander IIIAs in September 1943.
One of the 18 Lysander Is supplied to the Royal Egyptian Air Force.
Another of the Egyptian Mk Is, Y511, camouflaged and apparently attached to No 349 Squadron (GE code letters) serving in the Middle East early in 1943.
A Turkish Lysander II in 1940.
One of the four Lysanders that were modified in Canada as crop sprayers, for operation post-war by Westland Spraying Service
Lysander II P9105 was the subject of an interesting experiment in 1940/41 when it was fitted by Blackburn Aircraft with this parallel-chord swept-forward wing designed by H J Stieger.
One of modifications investigated by Westland was the use of underwing dive brakes, which were tested in flight.
One of modifications investigated by Westland was the addition of a four-gun dorsal turret, which did not proceed beyond this mock-up installation
Another modification designed to improve the Lysander s tail defence envisioned a ventral gun position. An aerodynamic prototype was flown but came to grief after engine failure, and the project was then abandoned.
Lysander II P9105 was the subject of an interesting experiment in 1940/41 when it was fitted by Blackburn Aircraft with this parallel-chord swept-forward wing designed by H J Stieger.
The original prototype Lysander K6127, fitted in mid-1941 with a four-gun Frazer Nash tail turret mock-up and a Delanne-style tail unit that converted it virtually to a tandem-wing type.