Air International 1984-09
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P.Jackson - Tornado - Four Years On
Tornado GR Mk I of one of the first five squadrons to fly the type in the RAF, which is now working-up towards its planned strength of 11 operational squadrons and two training units. Of the operational squadrons, eight will he in RAF Germany, and the other three in the UK; one each of these will be dedicated to the reconnaissance role, with internal sensors. In the UK, the Tornado is flown by No 27 Squadron and No 617 (photo); also formed in the UK, No 9 will eventually move to RAFG. Note, in this illustration, the AAR probe, which is retractable into a detachable pack on the starboard side of the fuselage.
Tornado GR Mk I of one of the first five squadrons to fly the type in the RAF, which is now working-up towards its planned strength of 11 operational squadrons and two training units. Of the operational squadrons, eight will he in RAF Germany, and the other three in the UK; one each of these will be dedicated to the reconnaissance role, with internal sensors. The first two Tornado squadrons in RAFG are Nos XV (photo) and No 16; both these squadrons at RAF Laarbruch previously flew Buccaneers. A start has now been made on re-equipping the Jaguar squadrons at RAF Bruggen.
Tornado GR Mk I of one of the first five squadrons to fly the type in the RAF, which is now working-up towards its planned strength of 11 operational squadrons and two training units. Of the operational squadrons, eight will he in RAF Germany, and the other three in the UK; one each of these will be dedicated to the reconnaissance role, with internal sensors. The first two Tornado squadrons in RAFG are Nos XV and No 16 (photo); both these squadrons at RAF Laarbruch previously flew Buccaneers. A start has now been made on re-equipping the Jaguar squadrons at RAF Bruggen.
Tornado GR Mk I of one of the first five squadrons to fly the type in the RAF, which is now working-up towards its planned strength of 11 operational squadrons and two training units. Of the operational squadrons, eight will he in RAF Germany, and the other three in the UK; one each of these will be dedicated to the reconnaissance role, with internal sensors. In the UK, the Tornado is flown by No 27 Squadron (photo) and No 617; also formed in the UK, No 9 will eventually move to RAFG.
Tornadoes from No 9 Squadron at RAF Honington and No 27 Squadron at RAF Marham rehearsing the first "diamond 9" formation flown by these aircraft, for the occasion of HM The Queen's Birthday fly-past on 16 June this year.
Aircraft in the markings of the AMI (extreme right), the Luftwaffe and the RAF on the flight line at RAF Cottesmore, the home of the Trinational Tornado Training Establishment (TTTE), which was the first Service unit to put the Tornado into operation.
The only British Tornado in other than standard RAF camouflage at present is ZA326, which is used by the Flight Systems Department at RAE Bedford for a variety of trials tasks.
Trials of the important JP 233 pod under way on the Tornado ZA354. Each of the two JP 233s carried by Tornado contains 215 area-denial mines and 30 parachute-retarded runway-cratering submunitions.
Trials of the important JP 233 pod under way on the Tornado ZA354. Each of the two JP 233s carried by Tornado contains 215 area-denial mines and 30 parachute-retarded runway-cratering submunitions.
A Tornado of No 617 Squadron in its HAS at RAF Marham
A Tornado of No 617 Squadron carrying the Philips BOZ-107 chaff/flare dispensing pod on the outer starboard pylon - matched to port by the Marconi ARI 23246/1 Sky Shadow pod.
Tornado ZA376, one of the four aircraft assigned to the Tornado Operational Evaluation Unit.
One of the Tornado GR Mk Is in service with the TWCU at RAF Honington. and a close-up of the badge of No 45 Squadron adopted by this unit.
Bombs being loaded with the help of the loading trolley specially developed for the purpose by Portsmouth Aviation.
Matching the sophistication of the Tornado is a computerised flight planning facility installed in each squadron HQ. Navigators plot their intended route by hand-moving a cursor over the small map table, “punching-in” way-points. The flight plan, recorded on a small tape cassette, is then inserted into the aircraft to be flown unerringly by the autopilot.
Panavia Tornado GR Mk 1