Aviation Historian 1
Lieutenant Colonel Arthur Tylee, Commanding Officer of the Canadian Air Force, stands beside D.H.9A G-CYBF during the trans-Canada flight. The epic journey between Halifax and Vancouver was completed when the aircraft reached the latter on October 17, 1920.
A photograph taken on May 14, 1980, depicting an actual-size mural of the first aircraft to land at Revelstoke, British Columbia, on October 13, 1920. Who painted it and is it still there?
Dutch airline KLM took delivery of the first of its Boeing 747-200Bs in early 1971, the prototype of the upgraded Jumbo variant having made its first flight on October 11, 1970. George photographed one of the first to be delivered to the airline at Shannon Airport in February 1971.
The first photograph of the single-bay Elephant to emerge was this one, with a young Sydney Camm in the foreground. Camm had joined Martinsyde in 1914 as a woodworker but he was soon promoted to the design office, heralding his rise as one of Britain’s foremost aircraft designers.
The newly-emerged photograph of the single-bay Elephant shows it standing in the Martinsyde hangar at Brooklands with its tail on a trestle. It is only the second image of the obscure machine to come to light.
Intrigued visitors inspect the scale model of the bizarre Camco V-Liner in the static park at Farnborough in 1968. Reportedly a 1/10th-scale flying model was tested at Elvington, Yorkshire.
The model the hoarding at Farnborough. The uncompleted full-scale aircraft was destroyed in a fire at Kirbymoorside on November 18, 1968.
A press release illustration of the extraordinary V-Liner - with most of the tubing omitted!