Aeroplane Monthly 1974-05
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B.Gunston - Avro's Baby Deltas
Deltas in delta formation; top to bottom, 707A WZ736,707B VX790, Vulcan VX777, 707C WZ744, Vulcan VX770 and 707A WD280.
Deltas in delta formation; top to bottom, 707A WZ736,707B VX790, Vulcan VX777, 707C WZ744, Vulcan VX770 and 707A WD280.
VX790, the low speed 707B, presents its blue undersurfaces to the camera.
The two-seat trainer variant, the 707C WZ744, flew in 1953. Four were originally ordered, but only one was built. It is now stored at RAF Finningley for the RAF Museum.
The last of the Avro 707 series to fly was the sole 707C, a side-by-side two-seat trainer.
View of the first 707, VX784, which survived only 26 days before it crashed near Blackbushe, killing the pilot.
WD280, the first high speed 707A, flew in June 1951 and was also the first of the series to have wing root intakes.
The second 707A, WZ736, was painted orange and first flew in February 1953. It is seen here at the SBAC show in September of that year.
WD280, the first high speed 707A, flew in June 1951 and was also the first of the series to have wing root intakes.
View of the first 707, VX784, which survived only 26 days before it crashed near Blackbushe, killing the pilot.
The two-seat trainer variant, the 707C WZ744, flew in 1953.
VX790, the low speed 707B, in takeoff attitude on December 28, 1950.
Another view of WZ744, the 707C two-seater.
VX790, the low speed 707B, landing with brake parachute deployed before touchdown.
The first 707, VX784, on view at the SBAC display, Farnborough, in September 1949, shortly after its first flight.
Avro 707A
Avro 707B