Aeroplane Monthly 1989-07
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P.Jarrett - Austin's Aerial Nippy
Great and small. K-158 alongside Handley Page O/400 J2251, built by the Birmingham Carriage Company.
Great and small. K-158 alongside Handley Page O/400 J2251, built by the Birmingham Carriage Company.
Designer J. W. Kenworthy stands by the nose of prototype Whippet K-158. Capt Nares, Austin's test pilot, is in the cockpit.
Flt Lt F. O. Soden runs up Whippet G-EAPF at Gosport on King's Cup day, August 12, 1924.
The second Whippet at Stag Lane in 1923.
The prototype Austin Whippet, with original form of cowling covering the cylinder heads, and with wings folded.
Another view of K-158, with the revised cowling which became standard for all succeeding Whippets. The absence of interplane wire bracing is evident.
The second Whippet after being fitted with a 60 h,p, Anzani to improve performance. Note the circular exhaust system.
The final Whippet shortly after completion. This aircraft was exported to New Zealand and the fuselage ended up in Australia, but it probably never flew "down under".
Whippet K-158 with its new permanent registration, G-EAGS, showing the wing folding.
The little machine is the Austin "Whippet" with 45-50 h.p. 6-cyl. Anzani, designed by John Kenworthy, who later produced the Redwing, and produced in 1919. This machine was the first post-war light plane, but it was, unfortunately, before its time, there was then no demand for such a machine, and it never went into quantity production. We believe the machine is still in existence, or was until quite recently.
A complete but uncovered Whippet airframe. This may well be G-EAUZ, the third machine, which was displayed at Olympia minus engine.