Aeroplane Monthly 1989-07
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Personal album
Frenchman Henri Salmet, chief instructor of the Bleriot School at Hendon, flies along the coast off Brighton Beach in his Bleriot XI during his 1912 Daily Mail Tour of Britain flights.
The batch of 50 O/400s numbered D8301 - D8350 was originally ordered from the British Caudron company, but the serial numbers were subsequently allotted to Handley Page Ltd, who assembled the aircraft from parts made by British Caudron and Harris Lebus. D8311 was completed in late August 1918, and was sent to France for use by the Independent Force, RAF; it arrived there on September 27, and moved to No 3 Aircraft Depot on September 29.
This O/400, C9704 was probably accepted late in July 1918. With wings folded, the overall width of the O/400 was reduced to 31ft; the full extended span was 100ft. Just ahead of the lower centre section can be seen the crew entry hatch: it bears the cautionary notice “Keep clear of the propellers".
This O/400, C9715, was one of the first production batch ordered from Handley Page Ltd under Contract No A.S. 27644. It was probably delivered early in August 1918, but it seems to have gone to France.
Two Handley Page O/100s at Coudekerque on April 20, 1918; these were probably of 214 Sqn. The aircraft at left has several flares in racks under the fuselage.
A Handley Page V/1500 climbs away after take-off. No doubt the seeming absence of the outermost starboard interplane struts is attributable to some photographic illusion.
This V/1500 was of the batch F7134 - F7143, built by Handley Page Ltd. Only nine of the ten were delivered, between November 1918 and March 1919. Unfortunately, the identity of this V/1500 cannot be accurately deter­mined.
On the early morning of February 29, 1912, some people leaving Shoreham Town Hall after a Leap Year Ball saw flames in the direction of the aerodrome. Three hangars were found to be ablaze, and part of a fourth was pulled down to prevent the rest of the row being engulfed. Damage was estimated at £1,000. The greatest loss was suffered by Chanter and Co, which ran a flying school at the aerodrome and lost both of its sheds, containing two Bleriot monoplanes and the Chanter Monoplane, a Nieuport copy which had been built by M. Chanter in 1911. What little remained of this aircraft is seen here, only the undercarriage and the 35 h.p. Anzani being recognisable.
With the pier and bathing machines providing a scenic backdrop, the Pashley Brothers’ Henry Farman-type biplane takes off from Worthing Sands in 1913 to return to Shoreham Aerodrome, its base.
During the spring of 1914 the Eastbourne Aviation Company's 80 h.p. Gnome-powered Henry Farman seaplanes, flown by Frederick Bernard Fowler, the company's founder, made several visits to Volk’s Waterplane Station at Brighton. Seaplane joyrides had become the "fashionable amusement" at the resort, and applicants for flights were so numerous that many had to be refused because of fading light. F. B. Fowler is seen in front of the nacelle in the close-up shot.
During the spring of 1914 the Eastbourne Aviation Company's 80 h.p. Gnome-powered Henry Farman seaplanes, flown by Frederick Bernard Fowler, the company's founder, made several visits to Volk’s Waterplane Station at Brighton. Seaplane joyrides had become the "fashionable amusement" at the resort, and applicants for flights were so numerous that many had to be refused because of fading light.
Claude Grahame-White flew his newly acquired Morane-Saulnier seaplane from the Isle of Grain to Brighton on Thursday July 31, 1913, taking 2hr for the 130-mile flight. Once there he gave several "fine displays" He had flown the aircraft, powered by an 80 h.p. Gnome engine, in stages from Paris to Putney, London, on June 26; the first seaplane flight between the capitals.