выгодно снять: продажа офиса в бц Город Столиц в москва сити
Air Pictorial 1958-02
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Photos by request
Circa 1926, a S.A.A.F. de Havilland D.H.9 (believed to be serial 159, the so-called D.H. Mantis), powered by an ex-S.E.5A 200-h.p. Wolseley W.4A Viper. Can any South African reader confirm?
RED FOKKERS. Now that Aeroflot is planning to extend its services to the Western European capitals (with TU-104s) it is interesting to recall that the first Soviet external service (Moscow-Berlin) was inaugurated in 1922 by the Russo-German company Deruluft, using five-passenger Fokker F-IIIs powered by the 360-h.p, Rolls-Royce Eagle twelve-cylinder, liquid-cooled vee engine. Developed from F-II of 1919, the F-III entered service initially with K.L.M. (Amsterdam-London, etc.) in April 1921, powered by a 240-h.p. Siddeley Puma six-cylinder inline engine. In this version the pilot sat to the right of the Puma, and In the Eagle version on the left side. Maximum cruise, about 90 m.p.h. Fokker's admirable Press Officer, H. Somberg, has pointed out that while RR1 and RR3 are standard high-wing Fokker F-IIIs, RR2 was an F-III-modified. In this case the wing was mounted above the fuselage (cantilever parasol), giving the pilot a magnificent all-round view.
Illustrating the use of constructor's numbers as serials in the late 1920s, a Bristol Fighter Mk. II trainer with dual controls (7120) in formation with a Hawker Tomtit (51). Markings are those of the R.N.Z.A.F. New Zealand took delivery (new) of the "Brisfit" in 1927.
MAJOR AND MINOR. Photographed on the maker's slipway (J. Samuel White & Co. Ltd. of Cowes. l.o.W.) in 1916 are two lesser-known naval prototypes: (left) the Air Dept. of the Admiralty A.D.1000 five-seat torpedo-bomber (serial 1358) and the White Baby single-seat scout (serial 9097). Three of the latter were built, but, like the 115-ft.-span A.D.1000, the 30-ft. 8-in.-span Baby was not operationally successful. The twin-boom A.D.1000 had two tractor (and one pusher) 3 10-h.p. Sunbeams, while the Baby had a 100-h.p. Gnome Monosoupape rotary.
ANY ANSWERS? Contributor George Fuller of Montreal identifies CF-AEB as a Wallace Touraplane Model B at the opening of Granby Airport in the early 1930s. He asks if any reader can provide further data? Builder was the Continental Aero Corpn. Ltd. of Montreal.
MAJOR AND MINOR. Photographed on the maker's slipway (J. Samuel White & Co. Ltd. of Cowes. l.o.W.) in 1916 are two lesser-known naval prototypes: (left) the Air Dept. of the Admiralty A.D.1000 five-seat torpedo-bomber (serial 1358) and the White Baby single-seat scout (serial 9097). Three of the latter were built, but, like the 115-ft.-span A.D.1000, the 30-ft. 8-in.-span Baby was not operationally successful. The twin-boom A.D.1000 had two tractor (and one pusher) 3 10-h.p. Sunbeams, while the Baby had a 100-h.p. Gnome Monosoupape rotary.