Flight 1927-02
Flight
A D.H.50 FOR NEW ZEALAND: This machine has been ordered for survey work, the cabin being specially arranged for the taking of photographs. Our picture shows the 50 on a test flight, piloted by Captain Broad, shortly before its despatch to the Antipodes. In the background is seen a "Moth," piloted by Capt. Geoffrey de Havilland himself.
FLYING IN 1909 AND STILL GOING STRONG: Capt. Geoffrey de Havilland, one of our pioneer designers and pilots, still flies whenever there is an opportunity. He is here seen on one of the "Moths," having a look at the recent snow from above.
A D.H.50 FOR NEW ZEALAND: This machine has been ordered for survey work, the cabin being specially arranged for the taking of photographs. Our picture shows the 50 on a test flight, piloted by Captain Broad, shortly before its despatch to the Antipodes. In the background is seen a "Moth," piloted by Capt. Geoffrey de Havilland himself.
DISFIGURATION: At the last House Dinner of the Royal Aero Club, Mr. C. R. Fairey referred to the manner in which the lines of an aeroplane are spoiled by registration letters. These two photographs rather bear out Mr. Fairey's contention. A motor car with registration letters "as large as the surface will permit" would probably not be easy to sell.
THE HAMPSHIRE AEROPLANE CLUB: Two of the "Moths" and some members of the energetic South-Coast club. The group includes, reading from left to right, Mr. Stanford (Assistant Ground Engineer), Mr. Bevis, Mr. Capon, Mr. Dickson, Mr. McCracken (Chief Ground Engineer), Mr. H. R. Bound (Hon. Publicity Secretary), and Capt. G. I. Thomson, D.F.C. (Chief Instructor).
Blackburns in Greece: Our photograph shows one of the five Blackburn "Velos" seaplanes recently tested by Major H. S. Travers, D.S.C., before delivery to the Greek Government. It is the production of the National Aircraft Factory near Athens, organised by the Blackburn Aeroplane Co., and is a development of the Blackburn "Dart" and "Swift" machines, being a 2-seater torpedo-carrying seaplane, fitted with a Napier "Lion."
THE FORD AERIAL "FLIVVER.": Henry Ford's experimental version of the popular "Flyabout." It is fitted with a 35 h.p. Anzani.
A GERMAN RECORD-BREAKER: The Rohrbach-Roland three-engined metal monoplane (of Luft Hansa) on which the German pilot Steindorf beat five world's records on February 4 at Staaken. With a load of 1,000 kg. (2,205 lbs.) he (attained a speed of 165 k.p.h. (102-5 m.p.h.) over the 500 kms. (310-7 miles), beating the last record of 163-076 k.p.h. (101-1 m.p.h.) held by Mittelholzer (Switzerland). With 2,000 kg. (4,410 lbs.) load he beat four more records: duration, 4 hrs. 18 mins.; distance, 600 kms. (372-8 miles); speed, 100 kms.- 173 k.p.h. (107-5 m.p.h.); 500 kms. - 165 k.p.h. (102-5 m.p.h.). The four original records held by de Lamothe and Bajac, were respectively, 4 hrs. 4 mins. 13 1/5 secs.; 500 kms.; 150-3 k.p.h. (93-18 m.p.h.); and 147-511 k.p.h. (91-4 m.p.h.).
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THE "GLOSTER GORCOCK": Three-quarter front view. Note the clean nose and careful streamlining generally. The engine is a Napier "Lion"
THE "GLOSTER GORCOCK": Side View. The family likeness to "Gloster" racing aircraft is obvious
RACING INFLUENCE: These two views of the "Gloster Gorcock," with Napier Aero Engine, illustrate the effect which experience in the design of racing aeroplanes has on design of service types. In the upper photograph the machine is actually flying, about one foot off the ground. Concerning the lower picture, all we need say is that our photographer is still with us.
THE "GLOSTER GORCOCK" in action, piloted by Flying Officer H. J. T. Saint, D.S.C. This machine is one of the fastest single-seater fighters in the world.
Mr. A. C. Kermode, B.A., Hon. Secretary of the Halton Aero Club standing by the "Mayfly."
THE HALTON H.A.C.1: On the left the "Cherub" engine with its mounting, and the right the tail. Note the undivided elevator.
THE HALTON H.A.C.1: Four general views
SOME CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS OF THE HALTON H.A.C.1 "MAYFLY": Above, the attachment of a lift wire and of the ends of the interplane X-strut to the top spar. On the left, the sternpost of the fuselage, showing how elevator control cables pass direct into the body and on to the control stick. On the right, the rudder cranks, those projecting through the fin being mounted on a vertical lay shaft.
AN AMERICAN SUBMARINE SEAPLANE CARRIER: This tubular hangar, containing a small seaplane scout (the S.1) neatly stowed away, is carried on the deck of a submarine, and it does not take very long to open the ''tube" door, remove and erect the seaplane ready for flight.
The Fokker B.III Flying Boat: A recent production from the Dutch Fokker factory. It is fitted with a Napier "Lion," and has a metal hull.
THE FOKKER B.III FLYING BOAT: Another view of the "Lion"-engined machine in flight.
A L200 Light 'Plane?: From Germany it is reported that the Espenlaub Works of Cassel intend to put on the market the small light 'plane shown herewith. The machine is fitted with a 35 h.p. Anzani engine, and rumour has it that the price i» not to exceed 4,000 Marks. How this is to be attained is not quite clear. It is stated that the machifte has been tested in "aerobatic" flying. The main dimensions, &c, of the Espenlaub II are :- Wing span, 10 metres (32 8 ft.); length, o.a., 5 m. (16-4 ft.); wing area, 14 sq. m. (151 sq. ft.). Weight of machine, empty, 280 kg. (616 lb.). Climb to 1,000 m. (3,280 ft.) in 6 minutes.
Koolhoven Light Plane 60 hp Engine
THE HUFF-DALAND XLB-1 "PEGASUS" BOMBER: Three-quarter front view of a successful American machine of metal construction. Note the wide wheel track.
THE HUFF-DALAND XLB-1 "PEGASUS" BOMBER: Side view. This machine is fitted with a Packard 2A-2500, 800 h.p. engine.
Huff Daland "Pegasus" 800 hp. Packard Engine
AN AMATEUR-BUILT LIGHT 'PLANE: The "Linnet" has been designed and built by members of the "Experimental Light 'Plane Club" of Nottingham.