Air Pictorial 1992-02
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M.Ashley - Canberra. Towards the 21st Century?
Canberra T.4 WH849/BE, call-sign "Mike 21", is prepared for Mr Pictorial's sortie.
Canberra PR.7 WH779 was on strength with 100 Squadron but is seen here with the badge of No. 13 Squadron, specially applied for a commemorative ceremony in October 1991 to mark the unit's past association with the Canberra.
Canberra nose jobs. That famous proboscis has undergone some serious surgery during its 42 years: A drastic change for the electronic warfare role in the T.17A;
Canberra nose jobs. That famous proboscis has undergone some serious surgery during its 42 years: The original shape, as seen on a TT.18, with the bomb-aimer's glass nose to the fore;
A sight now gone forever - a Canberra TT.18 of 100 Squadron at dispersal, framed by the empty Rushton target container and wing tank of a companion aircraft.
Canberra TT.18 WJ682/CU of 100 Squadron lifts off from RAF St Mawgan in August 1990.
The brilliant yellow-and-black striped under-side of the Canberra TT.18, which illustrate this variant's target towing role, are clearly displayed in tis ideal plan-view study on a lovely summer's day.
Canberra T.4's WJ866/BL and WT480/BC await another day's training. Both still carry the now-disbanded 231 OCU "Leaping Tiger" badge.
Canberra T.17A WK111/EA of 360 Squadron in the old-fashioned camouflage scheme.
Canberras undergoing deep level maintenance inside one of the hangars at RAF Wyton. The specially painted T.17A WD955/EM of 360 Squadron has the honour of being the oldest jet aircraft in service with the RAF.
Taking over from the Canberra with 100 Squadron is the Hawk, two of which are being prepared for a sortie from Wyton. The Hawk T.1A nearest the camera, XX285/CH, was formerly operated by 151 Squadron of 2 Tactical Weapons Unit at RAF Chivenor.
Canberra nose jobs. That famous proboscis has undergone some serious surgery during its 42 years: A total re-design for the PR.9. Note the camera window between the ladder and the left engine.