Air International 1994-08
R.Braybrook - Fighting Falcon V Fulcrum
MiG-29 "Fulcrum"
A sight unimaginable a few years ago; F-16A ADFs of the Minnesota ANG formate on a MiG-29 and MiG-29UB. The MiG-29s were transiting to display at a number of American air shows having appeared at Airshow Canada 1991 at Abbotsford, British Columbia.
Similar views of the F-16 and MiG-29 make an interesting comparison. The most notable similarities are the aerodynamically clean lines, integral cannon (in the port wing root) and LEX (albeit with different profiles). Significant differences, visible in these views, are the F-16's flight refuelling receptacle (on the fuselage spine), wing tip mounted AIM-9 Sidewinders, absence of a windscreen arch on the bubble canopy and the MiG-29's twin-engine and twin-fin configuration, IRST (immediately in front of the cockpit) and complex upper-surface air bleed louvre system.
Ground test equipment coupled to a MiG-29. The shield covering the NO-19 Slot Back radar may provide target test inputs to the system.
A ground crewman checks correct operation of the retractable FOD protection screens in the engine air intakes of a Czechoslovakian Air Force MiG-29. Note the metal fairing in front of the IRST to protect the sensor when not in use.
The key to the MiG-29's high angle of attack capability lies in the intake and wing leading edge root extension design which ensure a clean flow of air at the engine compressor.
The MiG-29 cockpit contains analogue displays akin to an earlier generation of Western aircraft than the F-16. While essential controls are mounted on the control column and throttle, it is not a HOTAS system. Later variants of the MiG-29, in particular the MIG-29M, feature multifunction display screens.
Comparison of F-16 and MiG-29.
F-16C Fighting Falcon 86-0289 120th Fighter Squadron 140th Fighter wing Buckley ANG Base Colorado
A sight unimaginable a few years ago; F-16A ADFs of the Minnesota ANG formate on a MiG-29 and MiG-29UB. The MiG-29s were transiting to display at a number of American air shows having appeared at Airshow Canada 1991 at Abbotsford, British Columbia.
Lockheed F-16A of the Minnesota ANG and MiG-29UB.
Similar views of the F-16 and MiG-29 make an interesting comparison. The most notable similarities are the aerodynamically clean lines, integral cannon (in the port wing root) and LEX (albeit with different profiles). Significant differences, visible in these views, are the F-16's flight refuelling receptacle (on the fuselage spine), wing tip mounted AIM-9 Sidewinders, absence of a windscreen arch on the bubble canopy and the MiG-29's twin-engine and twin-fin configuration, IRST (immediately in front of the cockpit) and complex upper-surface air bleed louvre system.
F-16A of 311 Squadron RNethAF demonstrating the type’s low-speed handling capabilities. Wing tip smoke generators give an indication of the angle of attack. The F-16’s 25’ angle of attack limit compares with beyond 45’ for the MiG-29.
F-16A J-877 of 312 Squadron RNethAF in a high-g turn, visibly illustrating the vortices shed by the wing leading edge root extensions. As with the MiG-29, these vortices act to re-energise the flow of air over the wing and also increase the lift.
F-16C 89-0025 of the Turkish Air Force using aerodynamic braking (incidence and air brakes) and brake ‘chute to reduce its landing distance.
После многих лет полетов на истребителях предыдущего поколения, имевших ограниченный обзор из кабины, пилоты F-16 описывали свои первые полеты на новом истребителе, как "полет верхом на гигантском карандаше".
This dramatic head-on view of an F-16 emphasises the smooth blending of the wing/fuselage junction and relatively unobstructed view afforded by the absence of a windscreen arch.
Ergonomically-designed cockpit of the F-16C contains multifunction displays below the HUD and sidestick controller.
Comparison of F-16 and MiG-29.
Lockheed F-16A of the Minnesota ANG and MiG-29UB.
A sight unimaginable a few years ago; F-16A ADFs of the Minnesota ANG formate on a MiG-29 and MiG-29UB. The MiG-29s were transiting to display at a number of American air shows having appeared at Airshow Canada 1991 at Abbotsford, British Columbia.