Air Pictorial 1992-02
-
M.Ashley - Canberra. Towards the 21st Century?
Canberra T.4 WH849/BE, call-sign "Mike 21", is prepared for Mr Pictorial's sortie.
Canberra nose jobs. That famous proboscis has undergone some serious surgery during its 42 years: The original shape, as seen on a TT.18, with the bomb-aimer's glass nose to the fore;
Canberra nose jobs. That famous proboscis has undergone some serious surgery during its 42 years: A drastic change for the electronic warfare role in the T.17A;
The brilliant yellow-and-black striped under-side of the Canberra TT.18, which illustrate this variant's target towing role, are clearly displayed in tis ideal plan-view study on a lovely summer's day.
A sight now gone forever - a Canberra TT.18 of 100 Squadron at dispersal, framed by the empty Rushton target container and wing tank of a companion aircraft.
Canberra PR.7 WH779 was on strength with 100 Squadron but is seen here with the badge of No. 13 Squadron, specially applied for a commemorative ceremony in October 1991 to mark the unit's past association with the Canberra.
Canberra TT.18 WJ682/CU of 100 Squadron lifts off from RAF St Mawgan in August 1990.
Canberra T.17A WK111/EA of 360 Squadron in the old-fashioned camouflage scheme.
Canberras undergoing deep level maintenance inside one of the hangars at RAF Wyton. The specially painted T.17A WD955/EM of 360 Squadron has the honour of being the oldest jet aircraft in service with the RAF.
Canberra T.4's WJ866/BL and WT480/BC await another day's training. Both still carry the now-disbanded 231 OCU "Leaping Tiger" badge.
Taking over from the Canberra with 100 Squadron is the Hawk, two of which are being prepared for a sortie from Wyton. The Hawk T.1A nearest the camera, XX285/CH, was formerly operated by 151 Squadron of 2 Tactical Weapons Unit at RAF Chivenor.
Canberra nose jobs. That famous proboscis has undergone some serious surgery during its 42 years: A total re-design for the PR.9. Note the camera window between the ladder and the left engine.