Air International 1988-02
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??? - Marauder: Mr Martin's Mean Machine /Warbirds/ (2)
Natural metal finish became the norm on later production Marauders, as seen on this B-26F-1-MA in the markings of the 558th Bomb Squadron, 587th BG.
Photographed al Hergla, Tunisia, on 1 August 1943, the B-26C-21-MO of the 320th Bomb Group sports "star-and-bar" insignia.
A Marauder I in service with No 14 Squadron, the first and for much of the war only RAF unit to fly the Martin bomber
"Loretta Young" was a B-26B-15-MA, shown in this photograph on 1 June 1945 whilst serving with the 386th Bomb Group. It has 40 mission symbols on the nose and the inscription "To Hell You Go" immediately above the "YA" code on the fuselage.
Two Marauders, retired from service with the Armee de I'Air, were used as test-beds for the Atar 101 turbojet, with lateral intakes and the jet pipe in the rear fuselage. Both were given French civil registrations for the period of their service as test-beds.
Another of the squadron's aircraft, named "Dominion Revenge", with torpedo under the fuselage.
A B-26B-10-MA and, on the right, a B-26C-6-MO of the 322nd Bomb Group in action, with ack-ack bursts dotting the sky.
Natural metal finish became the norm on later production Marauders, as seen on this B-26F-1-MA in the markings of the 558th Bomb Squadron, 587th BG.
In overall yellow finish, this is one of the 250 Marauders used by the US Navy and Marine Corps as target tugs.
Bedecked with "invasion stripes" and a ferocious shark's mouth paint job, this B-26B-55-MA served with the 397th Bomb Group.
Marauder III HD549 serving with No 3 Wing of the South African Air Force, principal user of the Marauders supplied to the RAF through Lend-Lease.
Marauder TB-26C-20 N5546N (№41-35071) в 1946 году был продан "United Airlines", а позже приобретен Лелендом Кемероном, и в 1949 году принял участие в гонках "Bendix Trophy Race", получив номер "24" и название "Valley Turtle" (на фото). К августу 1951 года самолет перешел во владение компании "Tennessee Gas Transmission Company", которая поручила "AiResearch Aviation Service" переоборудовать его в корпоративный.
The B-26C "Valley Turtle" appeared in 1949 in civil guise as N5546N to compete in the Bendix Trophy Race.
View of a B-26B-50-MA serving in the UK with the 387th Bomb Group.
View of a B-26B-50-MA serving in the UK with the 387th Bomb Group. Additional bracing can be seen in the windscreen, compared with the earlier production models.
The same aircraft later became the prototype for the B-26C-T conversion by AiResearch.
Other than the USAAF, RAF and SAAF, the only user of the B-26 during World War II was the Armee de l'Air, which began to receive B-26Bs and B-26Cs from the USAAF during 1943. These were supplemented by B-26Gs in 1944, the photograph showing this later model.
Awaiting delivery, a B-26G-15-MA shows the tail bumper under the rear gun position that was a late production addition.
Photographs of (left, upper and lower) a Marauder I FK111, and (right) Marauder II FB482, in RAF service provide a good comparison between the B-26A and B-26B/C variants. Notice, on FB482, the USAAF serial still displayed, and the torpedo rack under the fuselage.
Other than the USAAF, RAF and SAAF, the only user of the B-26 during World War II was the Armee de l'Air, which began to receive B-26Bs and B-26Cs from the USAAF during 1943. These were supplemented by B-26Gs in 1944, the photograph showing this later model.
Ground view of the Marauder III HD412
Marauder II FB436 at Eastleigh, where Cunliffe Owen Aircraft served as the "sister firm" for RAF Marauders.