Air International 1986-07
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J.Taylor - Soviet Attack Helicopters
An Mi-8 Hip-E assault transport helicopter toting six UV-32-57 rocket packs to which it can add four AT-2 Swatters to justify its reputation as the "world’s most heavily armed helicopter”.
A Polish Mi-24 Hind-D with the recently-introduced IR jammer taking the form of an inverted "flower pot" above the rear fuselage. Forward of the tail skid is a decoy flare/chaff dispenser.
A standard Hind-D with undercarriage extended and UV-32-57 pods on the underwing racks.
The rear IFF antennae under the tailboom and the rear navigation light
The undernose-mounted optical sight cupola for the anti-tank guided missile system
A close-up view of the 32-round 57-mm rocket pods, the inboard rail for a Swatter missile being seen on the right.
A close-up of Swatter missiles and UV-32-57 rocket packs mounted on a Czech Hind-D
The forward port quarter control panel in the Hind-D gunner's cockpit, primary function being the Gatling gun management (ie, inputs from air data systems in terms of altimeter/radio altimeter inputs, rates of fire, target data, reload, etc).
The passenger cabin rear bulkhead of Hind-D, the tank apparently being part of the glycol de-icing system and the cyrillic warning notice referring to the floor loading - maximum about 1,5 tonnes.
Hind-D pilot's reflector type gunsight
An artist's impression of Mi-24s with, in the foreground, chemical agents being released from underwing-mounted tanks
Mil Mi-24 Hind-D/E
A general arrangement drawing of the Hind-E with dorsal IR jammer and IR suppression exhaust mixer boxes over engine exhaust ducts.
An Mi-24 Hind-E with a twin-barrel 23-mm cannon.
Depicted by this US Department of Defense impression is the new Mi-28 Havoc combat helicopter "to be deployed in the near future". Noteworthy features include the upturned exhausts of the podded engines to reduce IR emissions and the barbette-mounted cannon.
A provisional general arrangement drawing of the Mi-28, noteworthy features including the pod-mounted engines with upward-deflected jet pipes, and thimble-type nose radome.
An artist's impression of the Kamov Hokum, which, although provisional, are based on the latest available information of what is believed to be the first true air-to-air combat helicopter.
A general arrangement drawing of the Kamov Hokum, which, although provisional, are based on the latest available information of what is believed to be the first true air-to-air combat helicopter.