Aviation Historian 29
-
S.Sumbodo - Garuda's 'Hamble Boys'
Indonesia’s “Hamble Group” pose in front of one of Air Service Training’s Douglas Dakotas at Hamble in 1952.
Marking progressive steps of training at AST, three examples of the organisation’s standard training aircraft fly in formation while up from Hamble circa 1952-53. Leading from the front is Chipmunk G-AMUC, one of more than 40 operated by AST, followed by Airspeed Oxford G-AITF (formerly ED290, one of four acquired by the organisation during 1947-50) and bringing up the rear is Douglas C-47B G-AMSW, acquired by AST in May 1952.
By 1957 Garuda’s Hamble Boys were becoming Hamble Men, gaining full captaincy on Garuda’s fleet of Dakotas and Convairliners. Seen here at Hong Kong’s Kai Tak airport in May 1957 is C-47A PK-GDW, one of the 22 acquired from KNILM in December 1949. It later served with Garuda subsidiary Merpati Nusantara.
Two of AST’s three Dakotas - G-AMSV, ’MSW and MSX - await another training sortie at Hamble. All three arrived at AST in the spring of 1952 and served until late 1954,when they moved on to new owners.
Indonesian Air Force students pose beside a Harvard, the type used for the military-trained Pensip 1’s Advanced Training course in the first half of 1952. Pensip 2 completed only Primary Training in Piper Cubs with the Air Force before being sent to the UK in late 1951.
Marking progressive steps of training at AST, three examples of the organisation’s standard training aircraft fly in formation while up from Hamble circa 1952-53. Leading from the front is Chipmunk G-AMUC, one of more than 40 operated by AST, followed by Airspeed Oxford G-AITF (formerly ED290, one of four acquired by the organisation during 1947-50) and bringing up the rear is Douglas C-47B G-AMSW, acquired by AST in May 1952.
Auster J/5F Aiglet Trainer G-AMUI is prepared for a training flight outside the distinctive hangar at Hamble. The Indonesian Pensip 2 students gained their instrument ratings for their CPLs on Aiglet Trainers at AST in mid-1952, before graduating on to the de Havilland Canada DHC-1 Chipmunk.
Marking progressive steps of training at AST, three examples of the organisation’s standard training aircraft fly in formation while up from Hamble circa 1952-53. Leading from the front is Chipmunk G-AMUC, one of more than 40 operated by AST, followed by Airspeed Oxford G-AITF (formerly ED290, one of four acquired by the organisation during 1947-50) and bringing up the rear is Douglas C-47B G-AMSW, acquired by AST in May 1952.
Chipmunk G-AMUC of Air Service Training frolics over Portsmouth Harbour.