Air International 2018-09
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Main: Commercial
The Ruslan is well suited for transporting heavy tracked vehicles for either military or civil use. Its cargo hold has space for three such machines.
A Mi-17 helicopter being loaded through the Ruslan's cargo door, with the aircraft kneeling to ease the operation. The cargo hold can accomodate four such helicopters.
Fuel consumption of the six D-18T Series 3 engines powering the Ruslan is 17 tonnes per hour during climb out to cruise level, reduced to 10 tonnes per hour while established in cruise flight.
The analogue flight deck of an An-124-100 operated by Volga-Dnepr. The vast flight deck offers space for six crew members - captain, co-pilot, navigator, two flight engineers and radio operator.
The Mriya is capable of carrying a payload weighing up to 247 tonnes.
Big cranes. Big cargo. Big aircraft.
The An-225 is available for airlifting unique pieces of cargo beyond the economic capability of an An-124.
The Mryia has a twin-fin empennage introduced to render it capable of transporting large-size loads, a capability not used since the monster’s introduction to commercial service in 2001.
The six D-18T Series 3 turbofans burn an average of 20 tonnes per hour in cruise flight, which is twice that of the four-engine An-124. During the first hour of flight fuel consumption can be as high as 30 tonnes.
The 640-tonne flying monster was heavily-refurbished, test-flown and received its type certificate in June 2001; this effort is believed to have cost Antonov and partners in excess of $20 million.
This 1980s photo shows the Mryia carrying the Buran re-usable space shuttle vehicle.
A Mi-17 helicopter being loaded through the Ruslan's cargo door, with the aircraft kneeling to ease the operation. The cargo hold can accomodate four such helicopters.
One of the initial air-to-air studies of the first A330-743L BelugaXL during its July 19, 2018 maiden flight from Toulouse.
A new structural addition are ventral fins on the aft fuselage to help provide stability.
Deharde in partnership with P3 Voith Aerospace designed and built the cargo hold and Stelia Aerospace the nose fuselage and main cargo door.
The BelugaXL is 6.9m (22ft 6in) longer and 1.7m (5ft 5in) wider than the first-generation aircraft.
The BelugaXL's horizontal tailplane box is wider and the auxiliary vertical end-fins taller than on the BelugaST.
One difference in the BelugaXL's structure from its predecessor is a 50% larger dorsal fin with a kink in the diagonal line.