Air Enthusiast 1992-12
D.Ford - A Tale of two Tails
The SB.5 in its flight configuration, ie high-set tail and 50° sweep.
The CHARLES E. BROWN study portrays Short S.B.5 WG768, built for low-speed trials of the English Electric P.1 wing in various configurations. It is now in the Cosford Aerospace Museum.
Another view of the SB.5 in flight in 60°, T-tail configuration. Designed only for low speed flight investigation, sorties rarely took the aircraft above 5,000ft. (1,525m)
Today the SB.5 is preserved at the Aerospace Museum, Cosford, albeit in an overall natural metal colour scheme. The aircraft never flew in this guise.
The SB.5 in its second guise, 60° degree sweep, but still with the RAE-favoured T-tail.
WG768 in the static at Finningley after retirement from ETPS. The aircraft still carries the ETPS fleet code and the overall blue colour scheme adopted during the 1958-1960 rebuild.
On show at the 1954 SBAC display with low-set tail and 60° sweep - by this time the P.1A had flown.
The SB.5 in its flight configuration, ie high-set tail and 50° sweep.
The SB.5 in its flight configuration, ie high-set tail and 50° sweep. Lower sideview shows WG768 in its final state - low-set tail and 69° sweep-back. All views emphasise the twin nose probes which measure 7ft (2.1m) in length. On the layouts, the aircraft is shown carrying pylon-mounted asymmetric load cannisters, which were designed to carry as much as 420lb (190kg). It is believed these were used only after WG768 arrived at RAE Bedford in August 1956, ie when the aircraft was at 60° sweep with low-set tailplane.