Aeroplane Monthly 1978-11
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Personal album
View of a Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.2E after turning turtle at Kinson. A mechanic has precariously scaled the fuselage, and is in the throes of attaching a line to the tail skid struts to enable the aeroplane to be righted. Once again, curious markings, believed to denote a training squadron, are in evidence. This time they take the form of crosses, a white one on the rudder, and a pair of dark ones beneath the lower mainplanes, though why these should be of odd sizes is unknown.
View of a Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.2E after turning turtle at Kinson. A mechanic has precariously scaled the fuselage, and is in the throes of attaching a line to the tail skid struts to enable the aeroplane to be righted. Once again, curious markings, believed to denote a training squadron, are in evidence. This time they take the form of crosses, a white one on the rudder, and a pair of dark ones beneath the lower mainplanes, though why these should be of odd sizes is unknown.
Armstrong Whitworth F.K.8 "Big Ack" B3324 displays the original form of undercarriage and the early radiators which extended from the top wing down the fuselage sides just behind the 120 h.p. Beardmore engine. Normally a reconnaissance aircraft, this example carries a diagonal bar marking across the rudder stripes, believed to be the marking of a training unit.
Avro 504J B3165 is seen here with a very unconventional modification to its cowling, which bulges out all round the engine. The reason for this is not known, but problems with the exhausting of the Gnome Monosoupape rotary engine may provide an explanation. B3165 is recorded as having served with "A" Flight of Maj R. R. Smith-Barry's School of Special Flying at Gosport at some stage of its life, so it may well have been paying a visit to Kinson when our pictures were taken.
Sopwith 5F.1 Dolphin C3797, powered by the 200 h.p. Hispano-Suiza engine, was from the first production batch of 500 aircraft. The first prototype of this back-staggered fighter was rolled out of Sopwith’s experimental department on May 23, 1917. Standard armament comprised a pair of fixed synchronised 0-303in Vickers machine guns in the forward fuselage and a single 0-303in Lewis gun on the upper wing attachment frame in the centre section, as seen in our photograph. C3797 was at Beaulieu on March 23, 1918.
Sopwith Pup B5904 was built by the Standard Motor Co Ltd of Coventry and is seen complete with its 0-303in Vickers gun on the forward fuselage, though this was often removed on training aircraft. The significance of the “1 A” markings is lost (the “1” is also painted on the rear fuselage top decking). Its docile handling qualities made the Pup popular at training units.
A well-worn, anonymous Caudron G.III with its characteristic "bath tub" accommodation for the pilot. By the time this picture was taken, the Caudron was an anachronism, with its single-surfaced wings aft of the rearmost struts (clearly visible here), and its unnecessarily cumbersome and complex empennage. This example has its 80 h.p. Anzani radial engine mounted on a greatly-extended nose, a very "unofficial" modification, perhaps to adjust the cg of the machine.
Royal Aircraft Factory F.E.2b A5794 is a Scottish-built example of this doughty reconnaissance fighter cum night bomber. By August 1917 the F.E.2b was serving only in the night bombing, anti-submarine and Home Defence roles, and it ended its service life in training units, where it was used to teach observers. This example was with No 1 School of Navigation and Bomb-dropping at Stonehenge in May 1918.