RAF B.E.2e
Варианты:
RAF - B.E.2e - 1916 - Великобритания
Страна: Великобритания
Год: 1916


Двухместный разведчик/легкий бомбардировщик
Описание
Фотографии
Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.2

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  Более массово выпускался вариант B.E.2c с двигателем RAF 1 а мощностью 90 л. с., ставший первым самолетом, оснащенным пулеметом. Другое вооружение было установлено на самолете B.E.2d, тогда как на варианте B.E.2e установили новые крылья и хвостовое оперение.
  На Западном фронте воевали самолеты B.E.2d/e, а более ранние модификации использовались в Великобритании и на других ТВД как учебные. Недостаток маневренности сделал его легкой мишенью в периоды воздушной войны, когда у противника появился "Бич "Фоккера" (1915-1916 годы) и в "Кровавый апрель" (1917 год).
  Общий выпуск самолетов семейства B.E.2 превысил 3500 машин. Самолеты в основном стали сниматься с фронта в 1917 году, а после Первой мировой войны активно использовались в качестве учебно-тренировочных, связных и противолодочных патрульных в прибрежных районах.


ТАКТИКО-ТЕХНИЧЕСКИЕ ХАРАКТЕРИСТИКИ

  Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.2e

  Тип: двухместный разведчик/легкий бомбардировщик
  Силовая установка: один рядный ПД RAF 1a мощностью 90 л. с. (67 кВт)
  Летные характеристики: максимальная скорость на уровне моря 145 км/ч; практический потолок 2745 км; продолжительность полета 4 ч
  Масса: пустого 649 кг; максимальная взлетная 953 кг
  Размеры: размах крыльев 12,42 м; длина 8,31 м; высота 3,66 м; площадь крыльев 33,44 м2
  Вооружение: обычно один 7,7-мм пулемет Lewis плюс в варианте бомбардировщика - легкие бомбы на подфюзеляжных держателях
BE.2 применялись на протяжении всей Первой мировой войны, они выполняли самые различные задания, в том числе корректировку огня артиллерии, разведку, бомбометание, и даже использовались в качестве ночных истребителей в системе ПВО Англии.
Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.2e, with machine-gun in forward cockpit.
Another visitor, BE2e 5861 of the RFC.
BE.2e B6183, with the crew behind the aircraft, at Darwin after completion of the flight.
A1361, first of a batch of 50 B.E.2e machines built at Dumbarton by Wm. Denny & Bros. It is seen here on September 2, 1917, with its pilot, Lt G. E. Wilson, Scottish Rifles. The aircraft was used for night flying over Gosport to exercise the searchlight crews.
A Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.2e takes off. Usually powered by the 90 h.p. RAF la, the B.E.2e was a single-bay development of the B.E.2c and d reconnaissance biplanes, distinguished by the large overhang of the upper wing extensions. Also introduced on the B.E.2e was the larger fin with a rounded leading edge, subsequently adopted as standard on all B.E. variants. More B.E.2es were built than any other B.E. type, but its performance was not much better than the earlier machines, and the observer was still positioned in the front cockpit. The type entered RFC service in mid-1916.
One of the best known B.E.2es was G-EANW, ex C7185, seen here at Hounslow in May 1919. It was destroyed ten years later when a hangar collapsed on it at Martlesham.
THE SUFFOLK CLUB'S DISPLAY: A most interesting machine which visited Hadleigh was Pilot Officer T. H. Carr's private machine, a B.E.2e, G-EANW, here seen doing crazy flying before the crowd. It was subjected to considerable inspection by the pilots, many of whom could recall their first flights on the B.E. machines during the war.
Sqn Ldr Curtis's picture of the BE2e, G-EAVS, which he entered in the 1921 Aerial Derby, and which was used by Cambridge for pre-aerial "boat" race practice the same year.
An unregistered BE 2e.
B.E.2e - самый многочисленный вариант семейства. Пара самолетов, названных "Rio de Janeiro Britons Nos. 7 & 2" (на фотографии - №2), принадлежала Южноафриканским ВВС.
Eighteen B.E.2es were shipped to Norway, ten in 1917. These ex-RFC aircraft served with the Norwegian Army Air Corps. B.E.2e No 145, on skis at Kjeller.
B.E.2e No 145, on skis at Kjeller.
B.E.2e No 131 after rollout at Kjevik Air Force Base in June this year.
Aircraft are prepared for flight testing at X Aircraft Park. They are, from left to right, a Bristol F.2B Fighter, an S.E.5a, a Nieuport 17 and a D.H.9. A Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.2e is also visible on the threshold of the Bessonneau tent hangar. The white circles in the foreground delineate a compass base for swinging the compasses of the aircraft.
BE.2es of 'Z' Flight dispersed outside their hangar on the Aegean island of Moudros, 1917/1918.
PRIVATE FLYING IN 1920: This Austin Whippet and B.E.2e, taken at Hendon in 1920, comprised the fleet owned by Mr. A. J. Greenshields, who is now in the Argentina, where he still flies the Austin Whippet as well as a Potez VIII two-seater fitted with a 70 h.p. Anzani engine. He is the only British private owner in that country
AT THE CROYDON MEETING ON EASTER MONDAY: The machines lined up for the Club Handicap. The first is B.E.2E, with 90 h.p. R.A.F.4.
DFW C.V и RAF BE-2e на полевом аэродроме в конце 1919г.
The sole example of the Sopwith F.1/1 taperwing Camel, tested at Martlesham Heath in May 1917. Powered by a 130 h.p. Clerget rotary, its wings tapered from 5ft chord at the centre section to 3ft 6in at the tips, and wide, plank-like interplane struts were fitted. Its performance proved no better than that of the standard Camel, and as the wing would have been more complicated to build it is no surprise that the type was abandoned. A B.E.2e is in the background.
One of three B.E.2es which carried the title Ho Fook Hong Kong. “Ho fook” means “good luck".
View of a Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.2E after turning turtle at Kinson. A mechanic has precariously scaled the fuselage, and is in the throes of attaching a line to the tail skid struts to enable the aeroplane to be righted. Once again, curious markings, believed to denote a training squadron, are in evidence. This time they take the form of crosses, a white one on the rudder, and a pair of dark ones beneath the lower mainplanes, though why these should be of odd sizes is unknown.
View of a Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.2E after turning turtle at Kinson. A mechanic has precariously scaled the fuselage, and is in the throes of attaching a line to the tail skid struts to enable the aeroplane to be righted. Once again, curious markings, believed to denote a training squadron, are in evidence. This time they take the form of crosses, a white one on the rudder, and a pair of dark ones beneath the lower mainplanes, though why these should be of odd sizes is unknown.
2nd Lt Calvert’s B.E.2e accident on September 8, 1917, which Mr Holwell escaped when permission for a joyride was refused by the unit Flight Commander.
"Only my straps prevented a quick splash down" - This B.E.2e, B73?, was a rebuild by No. 1 (Southern) Aircraft Repair Depot at South Farnborough.
B.E.2e No 141 wrecked.
Unlucky for some - Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.2e B3983 was built from spares at Montrose and was allotted to No 52 TS. On September 13, 1917, however, while 2nd Lt R. Jardine was making his second B.E.2e flight in it, he climbed too steeply and stalled, losing his life in the resulting crash and writing off the aircraft. Airco D.H.4s are just about visible in the distance on the right.
This tangled mass of wreckage appears to be a close-up of Jardine’s B.E.2e, B3983, from the other side. It certainly appears to have an in-line vee engine, and the B.E.2e had a 90 h.p. RAF 1a. Various items of cockpit instrumentation are discernible in the foreground.