Aeroplane Monthly 1979-08
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Cricklewood /Gone but not forgotten/ (4)
A Breguet 14A at Cricklewood after fitment of leading edge slats.
H.P. O/400 C9715 at Cricklewood in 1918. This aircraft was demonstrated to Canadian journalists at Hendon in August that year.
The slotted H.P.17 was a much-modified D.H.9, H9140, purchased by Handley Page from the Aircraft Disposal Board in February 1920. It was fitted with full-span slats on both upper and lower wing leading edges and the undercarriage was later lengthened by 12in. The H.P.17 was flown against a standard D.H.9 in comparative tests, and both aircraft are seen here at Cricklewood on October 21, 1921. Frederick Handley Page is second from left.
THE HANDLEY PAGE "GUGNUNC": Built for the Guggenheim Competition, this machine has slots all along the leading edge of its wings. These give extra lift, and prevent the machine from stalling. Armstrong-Siddeley "Mongoose" engine.
Capt. Cordes demonstrating the Handley Page “Gugnunc,” built for the American Guggenheim Competition. The machine failed to win because its minimum speed was 39.7 m.p.h. instead of the 38 m.p.h. stipulated!
The well-known photograph of the H.P.39 Gugnunc with pilot J. L. Cordes showing off its astonishing slow flying characteristics at Cricklewood in June 1929. The aircraft is currently stored by the Science Museum.
NOT FOR A LIGHT 'PLANE CLUB: A batch of six Handley Page "Hyderabad" bombers (Napier "Lion" engines) ready for delivery to No. 99 (Bombing) Squadron, R.A.F.
A line of newly-completed Hyderabads at Cricklewood in August 1927.
The modified H.P.32 Hamlet (it was originally a tri-motor) leaps into the air at Cricklewood in May 1927. Powered by two Armstrong Siddeley Lynx IIIs, the Hamlet was designed as a 6-7 seat taxi-aircraft.
Latecoere 25 F-AISB at Cricklewood after fitment of slats. The last aircraft to fly out of Cricklewood, it first had to be manhandled over a fence, just visible in the background, erected by the local authorities to prevent aircraft from using the aerodrome.
The slotted H.P.17 was a much-modified D.H.9, H9140, purchased by Handley Page from the Aircraft Disposal Board in February 1920. It was fitted with full-span slats on both upper and lower wing leading edges and the undercarriage was later lengthened by 12in. The H.P.17 was flown against a standard D.H.9 in comparative tests, and both aircraft are seen here at Cricklewood on October 21, 1921. Frederick Handley Page is second from left.
One of the three Handley Page-Sayers Motor Gliders built for the 1923 Lympne Trials. No 23 is seen here just prior to a bungee launch at Cricklewood in September 1923.
One of the three Handley Page-Sayers Motor Gliders built for the 1923 Lympne Trials. No 26 is seen here, at Cricklewood, also in September 1923.
H.P. O/10 G-EATN leaves Cricklewood bound for the Continent in May 1921. G-EATN was for a time equipped with one of the first automatic pilots. It crashed in France in January 1922.
A line up of Handley Page Transport aircraft at Cricklewood in 1919, including H.P.12 G-EAAE and H.P.10 G-EASY.
Freight from Paris being unloaded from G-EAMA.
Passengers boarding H.P.10 G-EATM in May 1921
The still-smouldering wreckage of H.P.12 G-EAMA at Golders Green on December 14, 1920.