Air Enthusiast 1972-06
L.Coombs - Front-office evolution (2)
In the Vickers Vimy, the pilot was seated on the right, following common practice in British aircraft of the day. The large diameter of the control wheel is obvious.
The "bridge" of the 12-engined Dornier Do X flying-boat with its bay window followed the style adopted by several German WW I bombers.
The pilot of a Gotha G V (seated to the left, with a gangway to the forward position on his right) showing the use of oxygen, sucked through a tube during high altitude flight.
British pilots showed a marked preference for open cockpits well into the 'twenties, the Armstrong Whitworth Argosy of Imperial Airways being typical.
An external view of the Zeppelin-Staaken R VI.
The "flight deck" of a typical German bomber of World War I, the Zeppelin-Staaken R VI, in which the captain sat on the left. The entrance to the open front cockpit can just be discerned ahead of the left-hand seat.
The Zeppelin-Staaken R V, like most multi-engined aircraft of its day, had an open cockpit for the two pilots.
The first significant British multy-engine aeroplane with an enclosed cockpit was the H.P.42 Heracles-class of Imperial Airways airliner.