In Action 1001
Luftwaffe in Action (1)
Blohm u. Voss BV 138B-1 3./SA Gr.125
Ground crewmen go about fuelling a BV 138B. Notice the single four-bladed propeller on the middle diesel engine. A Heinkel He 59 float plane is tied up in the background.
Two Rumanian officers inspect a BV 138C-1 belonging to 3./S.A.Gr. 125 on the Black Sea in 1943. (3rd Staffel of Seeaufklahrungsgruppe 125 - Sea reconnaissance Group 125)
The "office" of a BV 138 as seen from outside. The sliding windows on the canopy were large enough for a man to get out of if necessary. Note the 20 mm MG 151 in its turret.
In this photo, a BV 138 with engines idling is towed from its shore berth to deeper water where she can take off without trouble.
Left to fend for herself, the BV 138 taxies away from the quiet Norwegian fijord in the background.
With her engines at full power, kicking up a plume of fine spray behind, the BV 138B perpares to take off.
Just before lifting off the water. This is an aircraft of 2./Ku. Fl. Gr. 406 stationed in Norway.
The big flying boat makes a swing back over the land before heading out to sea on a coastal patrol. K6 were the unit codes of 2./Ku. Fl. Gr. 406.
A BV 138 in action during a practice supply drop. The characteristic exhaust smoke from the three diesel engines is quite evident in this photograph.
Гидроплан BV 138C из SAGr130 дозаправляется в море с подводной лодки
A shortage of fuel or damage to the aircraft caused this towing arrangement. The BV 138B has a splotched on "iceberg" white camouflage paint over its green surface. The submarine doing the work is a Type VII late model boat mounting much anti aircraft defense.
Crewmen busy themselves rubbing the dried salt spray off the plexiglass section of the nose and polishing them for better visibility. The small red and white plate on the frame of the entrance/exit hatch on the cockpit reads "Vorsicht-Luftschraube" (warning - airscrew!).
The upper rear gunner's position in the BV 138. His weapon is a 13 mm MG 131. The lower rear turret featured a 20 mm MG 151.
Here, supply containers are being fitted to the outboard wing stations of a BV 138B. The inboard stations have already been fitted with bombs.
This view shows the ETC 50 bomb racks with 3 x 50 kg bombs mounted on them. The BV 138B could carry either 6 x 50 kg bombs or two serial mines.
Although the center engine had a "beard" radiator, the engines mounted on the wings of the BV 138B had their radiators mounted further back under the nacelle in a square shaped fairing. Notice the three bombs mounted under the wing.
In this view, mechanics are servicing the Junkers Jumo 205D liquid-cooled diesel engine which put out around 700 hp. Note the ice on the upper surfaces of the aircraft. One may assume that the crewmen would rather be elsewhere.
Ground crewmen operate a heating unit which pumps hot air into the recess below the middle engine, allowing the engine components to thaw sufficiently before starting up.
A BV 138B is catapulted from the deck of a ship to begin a search. These aircraft had a 2,400 mile range.
Three BV 138Bs tied up at their berths in a Norwegian Fijord. The insignia on the second aircraft's hull is believed to be that of the 3rd Staffel, Ku. Fl. Gr. 406.
В кабине BV 138: рабочее место пилота
The pilot's seat in the BV 138. This aircraft has a Revi gun sight fitted for the pilot's use. Note the excellent all around vision afforded to the pilot.
В кабине BV 138: рабочее место штурмана
The right-hand seat of the flying boat is occupied by the navigator who is plotting the course of the aircraft. Note the absence of another steering yoke, indicating this aircraft could only be controlled by the man in the left seat.
The radio man's position looking to the rear from the flight deck. Many BV 138s were equipped with transmitters and receivers to communicate not only with their home units, but also with ships, submarines and ground units operating small portable tactical radio equipment. This radio man is in the process of tapping out a morse message with the "bug" in his right hand.
This view shows to advantage the MG 131 mount. The two springs on the right served to aid the gunner in elevating his weapon, as the entire gun and its mounting bar weighed quite a bit.
The upper rear gunner's position had almost unlimited visibility to the rear and sides, except for the twin booms and vertical stabilizers, which did pose a problem. Note the ring and bead sight on the gun barrel, through which the gunner aims.
Focke Wulf FW 189A-2, I.(H)/32 Finland 1942
Fw 189, украшенный по случаю 2000-го вылета своего авиаотряда
This FW 189A has just made its 2,000th flight of the Gruppe. Note the pilot's seat and armored head rest as well as the upward sliding hinged entrance doors built into the glassed area of the canopy.
With the dark clouds on the horizon indicating a storm front, ground crewmen go about tieing this FW 189 down and covering her vulnerable areas with canvas.
Ground crewmen in their characteristic black work uniforms prepare this FW 189A-2 for a flight. Note the open entrance hatch in the rear cupola and the open machine gun access panel on the wing root.
Armorers prepare 110 lb. bombs for mounting under the wings of a FW 189A.
With one bomb already attached, the armorers lift the next one up to its shackle. The FW 189 could carry four such bombs.
Подвеска 50-кг бомб. 1943 г.
After attaching the bomb to its rear shackle, it is then hooked to the front shackle. This aircraft bears the markings of 2 (H)/31, a short range reconnaissance group.
After the bomb has been attached to the ETC 50 bomb rack, the electrical release leads are checked so that each bomb will drop free when the pilot presses the release button.
Bombed up, warmed up and ready for take-off. Note the lead from the auxiliary power unit running into the rear of the engine.
Ground crew men hurry to finish attaching supply containers to the wings of this "Uhu" as the auxiliary power unit on a sled mounting is pulled away.
In this photo, the crew chief is removing the canvas covering from the propeller hub. Note the canvas stuck into the engine intake which has not yet been removed.
The crew chief of this FW 189 has just removed a protective canvas covering from the engine.
Ground crewmen work on the Argus As 410 engines of a FW 189A.
A FW 189A runs up its engines before a reconnaissance flight. Note the Ju 88s in the background, the stack of bombs on the ground and the ground crewman trying hard not to lose his hat.
A FW 189A flies over the Russian Landscape. The yellow bands around the engine booms were very characteristic of Luftwaffe aircraft operating on the Eastern Front.
This "Owl" bears a combination shadow-shaded wave mirror camouflage pattern over its original green on green "splinter" camouflage.
The FW 189 also served as personal transport for many high-ranking officers. Here, an Army General prepares for a flight.
It is obvious that this tank corps officer feels more at home on the ground than in this aircraft.
Prior to take-off, the pilot of the airplane speaks with some of the Panzer crew members.
Back home safely. The pilot points to a token of affection from the Soviet troops he had photographed earlier.
The FW 189F series aircraft featured more powerful Argus As 411 engines as well as a twin MG 81 mount called MG 81Z (Z for Zwilling or twin) in both the rear position and the dorsal position, pictured here.
This view shows to advantage the rear glassed in portion of the FW 189, which could be rotated by the gunner to allow his guns an upward, downward or sideward field of fire.
The rear gunner of FW 189F-1 behind his MG 81Z mount. Note the belt feed apparatus to the right of the guns.
Демонтаж аэрофотоаппарата
Here a large RB 50 aerial camera is about to be removed from a FW 189A after a flight over Soviet positions.
A Panzer trooper is entertained during a visit to a FW 189 reconnaissance unit.
Here, a tank driver tries his hand at the controls of a FW 189A-2 as another armored crew member watches from outside.
Focke Wulf FW 190A-7, Oblt. Josef Priller, JG 51
A good close-up view of the nose of a FW 190A-4 showing to advantage the 2 x 20 mm MG 151 cannons in the wing roots, the paddle bladed propeller and the fan behind the propeller which compressed the air flowing over the radial BMW 801D engine.
A FW 190A-5 with fuselage bomb shackles and open engine access panels.
A FW 190A-5/U-8 with under wing drop tanks and a 500 lb. bomb mounted on the fuselage bomb rack.
In this view, the engine is being put back together. Note the lack of outer wing guns, which means that this is a FW 190A-6.
One of the premier FW 190 pilots, Lt. Sepp Wurmheller of JG 2, shot down by P-47s.
Pilots of JG 2 gather around Lt. Wurmheller (fourth from left) to hear about his 81st kill. His aircraft, yellow 2, in the background, shows 80 kills on the rudder.
Pilots of 2. Staffel, JG 2, during pre-flight briefing. Note the eagle motif on the cowling sides. This marking was characteristic of many of JG 2's FW 190s.
A pilot performs his "Sitzbereitschaft", or cockpit readiness. When the word is given he will take off, but until then or until relieved, he must remain in the cockpit. The small open access panel on the fuselage is the oxygen tank lead where the oxygen bottles in the plane are refilled.
An interesting view of the upper surface of the fuselage showing the restricted view the pilot had in taking off. Note that the stress bar in the canopy is located actually underneath the plexiglass.
Here a FW 190 has its radio battery charged by a portable electrical generator. The jack from the cable is plugged into the connector to the battery compartment.
In this side view, one can see the protruding blast tube of the fuselage mounted 13 mm MG 131 that fired through the propeller arc, as well as the sturdy wide tracked landing gear.
Preparing for an early morning flight. An interesting aid to the pilot is the small rod sticking up out of the wing's upper surface adjacent to each wheel, informing the pilot that the landing gear is extended.
A unique photo of a FW 190 of JG 54 parked by a Finnish flown Fiat G-50 on an airfield in Finland.
FW 190s of 4./JG I at their home base in Northern Germany. The small cart in the foreground is the battery charger. Barely visible is the plug to the battery compartment, somewhat covered by the national insignia on the fuselage.
FW 190s of 6./JG 3 with some 109Gs of the same group in the background on a field in Holland.
A FW 190A prepares to take off. The bumps near the wing roots are access panels to the breeches of the 20 mm MG 151 cannons.
A "Schwarm' (flight of four) of FW 190As of JG 3 flies over its home base in Holland.
Mechanics in the process of tearing down the BMW 801D engine on a FW 190A. Note that when the cowling access panels are removed, the mechanics have unrestricted access to the engine.
The armorers prepare to hook another belt of ammunition to the one dangling from the wing. This FW 190 has had its wheel covers removed to prevent mud from gathering between the wheel and wheel cover.
A crash-landed FW 190. This aricraft will obviously never fly again.
A FW 190G of a "Schlachtgeschwader" roars down the runway with 4 x 50 Kg bombs slung beneath its fuselage.
Armorers prepare belts of 20 mm ammunition for this FW 190G's MG 151 cannons mounted in the wing roots. Note the tropical sand and dust filter mounted on the side of the cowling.
As one armorer prepares the 20 mm MG 151 in the wing roof for use, another under the aircraft is securing the fuselage bomb rack.
With the pilot looking on, the armorers finish their preparations. The armorer in the foreground is carrying a 50 Kg bomb. The black triangle on the fuselage of this FW 190G was a common marking for ground-attack aircraft.
The pilot of a FW 190G ground attack plane in his cockpit. The small insignia is a replica of the German combat infantryman's "Sturmabzeichen" badge.
FW 190s of 6./JG 3 with some 109Gs of the same group in the background on a field in Holland.
A unique photo of a FW 190 of JG 54 parked by a Finnish flown Fiat G-50 on an airfield in Finland.
A FW 200C-3 on a French airfield. Note the forward armament of the aircraft. The ventral gondola features a forward firing 20 mm MG 151 and the dorsal turret houses the same type of 20 mm gun. The Heinkel He 111 in the background is preparing to shut down its engines.
Cockpit of He 111P-3 dual control trainer (?)
A Ju 52 3m transport entertains visitors on its airfield. Note the uncommon use of wheel spats on this plane. Most military Ju 52s did not carry them.
A close-up of the "office" of a Ju 52 sporting a red cross pennant, signifying the aircraft is being used as an ambulance.
This Ju 52 carries an insignia depicting a lady with angel wings carrying a suitcase in each hand. Although the unit is unidentified, the concrete apron and the FW 200s of KG 40 seem to indicate the airfield at Bordeaux-Merignac, France.
The nose of a Ju 52/3m bearing the unit insignia of the 2. Staffel of Special Purpose Air Group 9, (2/KGr. 2bV 9) which was formed to transport supplies to the German troops, fighting in the Demyansk pocket in early 1942.
Believed to be an aircraft assigned to the 3rd Staffel of KGr zbV 9, this insignia is as yet unidentified, although the aircraft did participate in resupply of the II Armee Korps during the Demyansk battle.
The insignia of Instrument flying school B 36 as seen on the nacelle of port wing engine of a Ju 52. Although this school was located at Gardelegen, near Magdeburg, these aircraft were sometimes used as transports for paratroopers training nearby in the Letzlinger Heide training area.
Air crewman clean their various weapons as mechanics work on the engines of this Ju 52 of 10/KGr. zbV I. Barely visible is the red shield of the Staffel on the nose. The crewman seated on the box is cleaning a Bergmann machine pistol with fixed bayonet.
Ju52/3m на немецком полевом аэродроме в Польше, сентябрь 1939 года. Во время этого первого блицкрига Ju 52 использовались исключительно для транспортировки грузов. Лишь в следующем году эти самолеты дебютировали в роли десантных.
A line-up of Ju 52s belonging to an unidentified training school. Placement of the swastika between the rudder and vertical stabilizer (as opposed to the entire swastika on the vertical stabilizer) indicates that the aircraft is not assigned to an operational squadron.
A study of camouflage and markings. These aircraft are loading up for a resupply mission on the Eastern Front. At least two white camouflaged Ju 52s are visible, plus one grey Lufthansa plane in military service, as well as a grey and green splinter painted Ju 52.
Luftwaffe ambulance drivers pose by their mounts as a flight sergeant in the cockpit of the Ju 52 prepares the aircraft for flight. The loop antenna of the direction finder and the air-driven generator and its small propeller may be seen on the top of the fuselage.
"Tante Ju" being used as an ambulance during the Polish campaign. She features an all-white color scheme, black anti glare and exhaust panels and large red crosses on the fuselage sides, on top of the fuselage, and under both wings.
With the sun setting behind them, this group of Ju 52s keep to low altitude for protection while crossing the Mediterranean.
Photographed from another Ju 52, this "Tante Ju" sweeps low over a Greek Orthodox church on its landing approach.
These Luftwaffe troops are unloading supplies from the side cargo door of this Ju 52. The officer on the far right is a captain and his flight suit indicates he may be the pilot of the aircraft.
Ju 52s were not without some means of defense, as evident by this top gunner and his single MG 81 machine gun.
A somewhat unexpected occurrance during landing happened to this Ju 52 of 9./KGr. zbV I. Note the squadron code letter on the leading edge of the wing. This is not a common marking practice.
A FW 189A runs up its engines before a reconnaissance flight. Note the Ju 88s in the background, the stack of bombs on the ground and the ground crewman trying hard not to lose his hat.
Ground crew men unravel the tow cable prior to hooking it to the towing attachment on a Ju 87 dive bomber's tail wheel.
In this photo, the tow cable may be seen strung out between the DFS 230A glider and the Ju 87R tow plane. The ground crew NCO in the foreground is tightening the retaining bolt with a wrench.
The Ju 87R-3 tow plane begins it taxi to the runway before take-off. Both the Ju 87R-3 and Ju 87R-4 were fitted with glider tow attachments. Note the crew member in the foreground wearing a floatation vest. The crew man sitting on the wing of the "Stuka" is helping to guide the aircraft as the pilot's visibility during take-offs was somewhat restricted by the plane's cowling.
Prior to take-off. With brakes on and throttle forward, the pilot revs up his engine in order to lift the loaded glider he will be towing aloft.
Straining for altitude, the pilot of this Ju 87R-3 applies full power to his engine. It is believed that these photos were taken in the Hannover-Magdeburg region of Northwest Germany, a prime area for such training.
Finally aloft, the Ju 87R and its DFS 230A mate, level off and head for their destination over the northwest German flatlands.
This DFS 230A is one of the gliders that was to be used in the proposed air invasion of Malta. Note the color scheme of Green 71 uppersurfaces and Blue 65 fuselage sides and undersurfaces.
Luftwaffe ground crewmen (the NCO looking into the cockpit is wearing a summer tunic) prepare to tour an early DFS 230A back to the airfield after it has landed. This early version is distinguished from the later version by addition of extra window in the nose to allow the pilot better downward vision. The design on the nose is either a personal insignia or an as-yet unidentified unit insignia.
Here a NCO pilot in flight suit shows his "office" to a NCO of one of the Flak units guarding the airfield. Note the 7.92 mm MG 81 machine gun on its mounting behind the pilot.
An armorer mounts the MG 81 into its swivel mount. All versions of the DFS 230 carried such armament and many such gliders attached to air-landing assault units mounted extra guns that could be fired by the pilot.
A NCO pilot adjusts the MG 81 on its flexible mount. Visible in this photo is the rear view mirror which was sometimes the glider's only other means of defense. Often a forward firing MG 34 was mounted on brackets just below the canopy hinges. The gun was fed from a belt from within the canopy, and fired by means of a wire attached to the trigger, running into the canopy.
DFS 230As on an airfield in Southern Italy. These gliders were used in North Africa for carrying supplies and evacuating personnel to Italy. They feature a camouflage of grey 75 uppersurfaces, RLM Grey 02 undersurfaces and fuselage sides and grey 74 mottling on the fuselage. Aircraft in the photo are coded LB+194, LB+192 and LB+196.
One the "men in black", a Luftwaffe ground crewman, attaches the tow cable with its release mechanism to the nose of a DFS 230A assault glider. This aircraft is obviously fitted with forward firing machine gun brackets. If not, the function of the ring sight in front of the windshield escapes this writer.
In this photo, the tow cable may be seen strung out between the DFS 230A glider and the Ju 87R tow plane. The ground crew NCO in the foreground is tightening the retaining bolt with a wrench.
Finally aloft, the Ju 87R and its DFS 230A mate, level off and head for their destination over the northwest German flatlands.
The "Jutlandia", the second FW 200A to be sold to the Danish State airlines, in November of 1938. The aircraft featured 4 x 720 hp radial engines, each turning a fixed pitch Hamilton Standard two-bladed propeller.
Ground crewmen go about fuelling a BV 138B. Notice the single four-bladed propeller on the middle diesel engine. A Heinkel He 59 float plane is tied up in the background.
A FW 200C-3 on a French airfield. Note the forward armament of the aircraft. The ventral gondola features a forward firing 20 mm MG 151 and the dorsal turret houses the same type of 20 mm gun. The Heinkel He 111 in the background is preparing to shut down its engines.
A FW 200C-3 of Blindflugschule B-36 (Instrument Flying School B-36) at Gardelegen in 1942. Many of these flying school FW 200s were pressed into emergency service as cargo planes used to re-supply German troops on the Eastern Front. The most notable use of these aircraft was their use at Stalingrad.
Another view of the FW 200C-3 of Blindflugschule B-36. Mechanics are preparing to work on one of the four 1,000 hp BMW 323 engines. Note the all-around access panels on the cowl, giving the mechanics ample space to work.
A close shot of the BMW 323R-2 engines on a FW 200C-3. Just visible is the 20 mm gun in the central gondola which was fired by the bomb-aimer.
Ground crewmen manhandle a FW 200C-4 reconnaissance bomber on to the apron at Bordeaux-Merignac. The aircraft is one of KG 40's planes, but does not carry the KG 40 "Globe" insignia. What appear to be machine gun bullet holes on the forward fuselage adjacent to the inboard engine, are distortions caused by the photographer during development.
Another view of the same aircraft, F8+KM, taken while in use as a cargo plane during the Demyansk battle in Russia. Note the yellow fuselage band denoting an aircraft operating on the Eastern Front.
On the runway at Bordeaux-Merignac, a FW 200C-4 with the "Hohentweil" radar antenna on its nose prepares to take off.
Another view of a KG 40 FW 200C-4 on the Bordeaux-Merignac runway. Later during the War, Heinkel He 177s were assigned to KG 40 to fulfill the same mission the FW 200 performed.
A FW 200C-4 with "Hohentweil" radar, showing to advantage the long barrelled MG 151/20 in the bombardier's ventral gondola.
This photo, taken in early 1942, shows that this FW 200 is responsible for at least 11,000 tons of Allied shipping, plus twelve missions over England.
A squadron painter scrapes excess paint off a new mission marker on the tail of one of KG 40's FW 200s.
The very impressive tally sheet on this KG 40 aircraft shows around 38,000 tons of Allied shipping destroyed. This aircraft is believed to be one of the 2 Staffel of KG 40.
A group of ground and air crew members looking on while a crew exits their ship. Noteworthy is the inconsistency in the uniform of the day, as well as the massive construction of the FW 200's undercarriage legs.
The navigator of a FW 200 surveys a map of the Norwegian coast. To the navigator's right may be seen the ammunition stowage box and the ammunition belt running to a MG 15 located in the fuselage window.