Air Enthusiast 1999-11
S.Harding - Canadian Connection
European-based U-6A 52-6132 at a UK airshow - Blackburn Beverley C.I transport behind. The white/natural metal with dark blue cheatline and ‘Day-Glo’ panels being another of the Beaver colour schemes
U-1A 55-3287 in glossy olive drab, again in the UK. British Army Air Corps Beaver AL.I behind
An early production L-20A inflight, sporting red and white ‘Arctic’ colours,
Although Vietnam was mostly a ‘helicopter war’, the US Army also operated various fixed-wing types in theatre for transport, liaison and communications. The YL-20 Beaver seen here, 51-6266, was the last of four development aircraft for US Army trials and, as can he seen, later went into operational service. Redesignated U-6A in 1962, the Beaver saw considerable use in Vietnam. Korea was the first war zone that the L-20A Beaver operated in.
Among the 20 Caribou that remained in Army service following the 1966 Army-Air Force agreement was 57-3083, one of the original YAC-1s. Pictured at Fort Bragg in June 1976, it served the Golden Knights parachute demonstration team until replaced by two Fokker C-31s in 1985.
YAC-1 57-3082, one of five commercial DHC-4s ordered by the Army in 1957 and sporting the red and white 'Arctic' paint scheme.
European-based U-6A 52-6132 at a UK airshow - Blackburn Beverley C.I transport behind. The white/natural metal with dark blue cheatline and ‘Day-Glo’ panels being another of the Beaver colour schemes
U-1A 55-3287 in glossy olive drab, again in the UK. British Army Air Corps Beaver AL.I behind
Otter 55-2977 was one of six purchased 'off the shelf' for service testing in 1955.
The Army’s sole C-8, BuNo 13689 on the ramp at Fort Bragg, awaiting disposal. The service markings are schizophrenic, Airborne forces badge on the engine cowl, ‘United States Army’ titling on the lower fuselage, but it carries the word ‘Navy’ underneath the port wing
DHC-5 Buffalo STOL utility transport (two 2,850 eshp General Electric T64-GE-10 turboprop engines)
First of four Buffalo prototypes acquired by the Army, YCV-7 63-13686, April 1965.
The first UV-18s for the Alaska Army National Guard, 76-22565 and -22566. Note the high-floatation landing gear and the high-visibility paint scheme,
The second of three original RC-7Bs, N5382W, during an early test flight and before drastic ‘surgery’ to its fuselage contours.
USAAF float-equipped UC-64A 43-5121, virtually identical to the UC-64Bs used by the Army Corps of Engineers. This aircraft was turned over to the Army in 1947 and was operated until 1949.
The VZ-9 on display at Fort Eustis following the end of flight testing, craft’s ‘front’ is to the right, one of the faired-over cockpits is visible below the large central fan.
The VZ-9 hovers just above the ground during a June 1961 test flight. Note the three sets of twin-wheel landing gear