Air Pictorial 1957-02
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H.Nowarra - Portraits of the Roland Family
Determined to produce aircraft of their own design, L.F.G. appointed an engineer named Tantzen as head designer in 1914, and it was he who was responsible for the " Roland" line. His first design, the C-II Walfish, was a sleek streamlined aeroplane but pilot-visibility was poor and it was dropped in favour of the D-I Haifisch.
Only a small number of D-Is were constructed, and it was followed by the D-II Haifisch.
Determined to get a successful design into production again Tantzen concentrated on developing the D-l and D-II. The result was the D-III, but only five were built.
The L.F.G. Arrow was followed by the Taube.
Determined to produce aircraft of their own design, L.F.G. appointed an engineer named Tantzen as head designer in 1914, and it was he who was responsible for the " Roland" line. His first design, the C-II Walfish, was a sleek streamlined aeroplane but pilot-visibility was poor and it was dropped in favour of the D-I Haifisch.
Meanwhile Tantzen had not been idle and had designed another scout, the C-III, the prototype of which, and the L.F.G. plant, was destroyed by fire in 1915.
The Luftfahrzeueug-Gesellschaft (L.F.G.) Company was founded in 1912 by Major von Parseval primarily to build airships of his own design. A small factory wa also established in Johannisthal for the construction of aeroplanes, and the first design completed was the L.F.G. Arrow, a biplane powered by a 95-h.p. Mercedes engine.
Although the emphasis at L.V.G. was on building single-engined scouts the world 's first twin-engined bomber, the Roland G-I, was constructed by the company in 1915. It was powered by two Basse & Selve engines of 150 h.p. each mounted in the fuselage and driving the wing-mounted propellers by means of chains.
While a new factory was being readied in Berlin three float plane were designed and constructed at the L.F.G. plant at Warnemunde on the Baltic Sea. They were the Nr.509 (photo); the Nr.750 and the Nr.943. All three were unsuccessful.
While a new factory was being readied in Berlin three float plane were designed and constructed at the L.F.G. plant at Warnemunde on the Baltic Sea. They were the Nr.509; the Nr.750 (photo) and the Nr.943. All three were unsuccessful.
While a new factory was being readied in Berlin three float plane were designed and constructed at the L.F.G. plant at Warnemunde on the Baltic Sea. They were the Nr.509; the Nr.750 and the Nr.943 (photo). All three were unsuccessful.
After this abortive attempt Tantzen returned to designing scouts and in 1917 the C-V (photo), powered by a 150-h.p. Benz, and the C-VIII, powered by a 220-h.p. Mercedes, were built. Both types were unsuccessful and the German Air Ministry ordered the L.F.G. company to build the Halberstadt CL-IV and the Hannover CL-IIa under licence.
After this abortive attempt Tantzen returned to designing scouts and in 1917 the C-V, powered by a 150-h.p. Benz, and the C-VIII (photo), powered by a 220-h.p. Mercedes, were built. Both types were unsuccessful and the German Air Ministry ordered the L.F.G. company to build the Halberstadt CL-IV and the Hannover CL-IIa under licence.
Meanwhile L.F.G. had developed a new method of aircraft construction called "Klinkerrumpf" that saved both time and money. This method was used on all Rolands from the D-IV (photo) to the D-XV/2. The D-IV, Tantzen's first triplane, was powered by a 160-h.p. Mercedes, but was dropped in favour of the Fokker and Pfalz triplanes.
The D-VI was extensively modified before entering production and as the VIa (photo) was powered by a 180-h.p. Mercedes ; the VIb had a 150-h.p. Benz and larger tail surfaces and went into production.
Some Vlb were fitted with modified ailerons and a 200-h.p. Benz engine.
Two versions of the D-VII were constructed. One, the D-VII/1 (photo) was powered by a 200-h.p. Benz III, while the other model, the D-VII/2 had a 200-h.p. Benz IIIb.
The D-X, D-XI and D-XII were projects, and the D-XIII was a D-Vll with a 195-h.p. Korting III in place of the original Benz.
Next in the Roland line was the D-XV. The XV/1 (photo) was powered by a 160-h.p. Mercedes and a second version, the XV/2 had single strut in place of the normal twin struts.
Third version, the XV/3 (photo), was practically a new design and comparison of the two photographs show the differences in these machines. Two airframes were constructed, one with a 200-h.p. Benz IIIaV and the other with a 185-h.p. BMW.
Three versions were constructed, the IX/1 powered by a 160-h.p. Siemens Sh3 engine driving a four-bladed propeller; the IX/2 with a 210-h.p. Siemens Sh3a driving a two-bladed propeller; and the IX/3 (photo) with the same engine as the lX/2 but fitted with a larger rudder.
The D-XIV was a D-IX/1 powered by a 170-h.p. Goebel Goe III engine.
Last of the Roland scouts were the D-XVI powered by either a 160-h.p. Siemens Sh II (photo) or a 170-h.p. Goebel III, and the D-XVIII, powered by a 185-h.p. BMW.
Last of the Roland scouts were the D-XVI powered by either a 160-h.p. Siemens Sh II or a 170-h.p. Goebel III (photo), and the D-XVIII, powered by a 185-h.p. BMW.
Last of the Roland scouts were the D-XVI powered by either a 160-h.p. Siemens Sh II or a 170-h.p. Goebel III, and the D-XVIII (photo), powered by a 185-h.p. BMW.