Flight 1924-10
Flight
THE D.H.9 SEAPLANE: Four views of the D.H.9 (230 h.p. Siddeley Puma engine) with which trials were recently carried out with the object of producing a suitable float undercarriage for use on the D.H.50 biplane. There is considerable demand for a seaplane of this type for use in the Colonies.
AN INCIDENT IN THE KINGS CUP RACE. Two views of the Fairey III-D seaplane (450 h.p. Napier "Lion" engine) at Stranraer, on the occasion of the last King's Cup Race, August 12. Above, bringing the seaplane ashore. Below, the crowd watching the refueling operations - note the "Shells" on the shore.
THE FAIREY AMBULANCE SEAPLANE: Three views of the Fairey III-D seaplane (Rolls-Royce "Eagle IX" engine), which has been specially fitted out as an ambulance for service in British Guiana. On the left, the "patient" is shown being hoisted up on the stretcher by means of a portable winch. In the centre, the "patient" is safely stowed inside the fuselage, and the hinged fuselage-top is being closed down. Right, general view of the machine ready for flight.
SOME MACHINES AT THE DAYTON INTERNATIONAL AIR RACES: The "Canuck," also with clipped wings.
THE LIGHT 'PLANE RACE FOR THE GROSVENOR CHALLENGE CUP: 3 shows the machines lined up for the race
THE LIGHT 'PLANE RACE FOR THE GROSVENOR CHALLENGE CUP: 4 shows Douglas on the Parnall " Pixie IIIa";
Pixie IIIA in biplane configuration and flown in 1924 at Lympne. In the official races it was flown in monoplane form still as No.18. This machine is fitted with a Bristol "Cherub."
TAKE-OFF AND PULL-UP TESTS AT LYMPNE: 1, Wheeling Longton's Hawker "Cygnet I" and Douglas's Parnall "Pixie IIIa " back for the take-off tests.
The Second Parnall "Pixie III" mono-biplane, No. 19, in flight.
TAKE-OFF AND PULL-UP TESTS AT LYMPNE: 2, The Parnall "Pixie IIIa" clearing the 25-ft. posts.
LOW-SPEED FLYING AT LYMPNE: 6, Douglas on the Parnall "Pixie."
SOME MORE CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS FROM LYMPNE: (7) Wing bracing strut quick-release on Parnall "Pixie IIIa." The small tubular strut runs to root of lower front spar.
CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS OF LIGHT 'PLANES AT LYMPNE: (4) Mounting of Bristol "Cherub" in Parnall "Pixie IIIa."
SOME MORE CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS FROM LYMPNE: (4) Inspection door and steel attachments on lower starboard wing of Parnall "Pixie IIIa."
SOME MACHINES AT THE DAYTON INTERNATIONAL AIR RACES: The Special C.6 Curtiss "Oriole," with clipped wings
THE STOUT AIR PULLMAN: An all-metal commercial aeroplane built in America. It is fitted with a 400 h.p. "Liberty" engine.
THE STOUT "AIR PULLMAN": The machine is shown in flight
THE STOUT "AIR PULLMAN": An interior view of the cabin.
TOO LATE FOR LYMPNE: The Blackburn "Bluebird" with Blackburne engine was not finished in time to take part in the recent two-seater light 'plane competitions.
DIGNITY AND IMPUDENCE; or, the long and the "Short" of it; A study in contrasts. The small twin-engined Short light flying boat under the wing of an F.5; the smaller machine is to be tested this week.
Raynham, on the Hawker biplane, flying at Lympne.
LOW-SPEED FLYING AT LYMPNE: 2, Longton on No. 14 Hawker.
LOW-SPEED FLYING AT LYMPNE: 5, Raynham on the Hawker "Cygnet II."
TAKE-OFF AND PULL-UP TESTS AT LYMPNE: 4, Raynham making a landing on the Hawker "Cygnet II."
TAKE-OFF AND PULL-UP TESTS AT LYMPNE: 1, Wheeling Longton's Hawker "Cygnet I" and Douglas's Parnall "Pixie IIIa " back for the take-off tests.
AT THE LYMPNE LIGHT 'PLANE TRIALS: Lord Ed. Grosvenor (right) and Mr. W. H. Longton, discussing prospects.
SOME MORE CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS FROM LYMPNE: (3) Bottom plane attachment to wing roots on Sopwith-Hawker "Cygnets." The wing roots are covered with aluminium.
The D.H.51 was much in evidence at Lympne piloted by Mr. Barnard, and took up a number of distinguished passengers.
THE LIGHT 'PLANE RACE FOR THE GROSVENOR CHALLENGE CUP: In 7 Cobham is seen standing the de Havilland 53 on its wing tip while rounding the aerodrome turning point.
SOME MORE CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS FROM LYMPNE: (2) Spar and flap hinges on Vickers "Vagabond." Note the joint in the fuselage which allows of setting the angle of the rear portion.
THE LIGHT 'PLANE COMPETITION, LYMPNE: The crowd is interested in the tuning-up of some of the machines.
The Light 'Plane Competition, Lympne: The Bristol "Brownie" monoplane, No. 1, gets away. It is fitted with a Bristol "Cherub" engine.
LOW-SPEED FLYING AT LYMPNE: 1, Uwins on the Bristol "Brownie." Sir Geoffrey Salmond in the foreground.
TAKE-OFF AND PULL-UP TESTS AT LYMPNE: 3, Uwins "hoiking" the Bristol "Brownie" over the posts in the take-off test.
The Bristol "Brownie" monoplane, No.2, heads for the starting line at Lympne. The best get-off in 1924 was made by the Bristol "Brownie," with Bristol "Cherub" engine, piloted by Cyril Uwins.
CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS OF LIGHT 'PLANES AT LYMPNE: (6) Under carriage of Bristol "Brownie"
SOME MORE CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS FROM LYMPNE: (6) Locking-pin arrangement on rear spar of Bristol "Brownie."
A FEW UNORTHODOX TAIL SKIDS ON LYMPNE MACHINES: The Bristol is a leaf-spring and the Avro a bent tube. The Short has a long straight, tubular skid, and the Westlands a horizontal Vee with compression spring to the stern-post.
The Glenn Martin Model 70 Commercial biplane, a cargo or passenger machine fitted with a 200 h.p. Wright Model E.4 engine.
DIGNITY AND IMPUDENCE; or, the long and the "Short" of it; A study in contrasts. The small twin-engined Short light flying boat under the wing of an F.5; the smaller machine is to be tested this week.
THE DAYTON INTERNATIONAL AIR RACES. The principal event of this big American three-day aviation meeting was the speed contest for the Pulitzer Trophy. Above is a front view of the 1922 Verville-Sperry (500 h.p. Curtiss D-12) cantilever monoplane which won this year's race with a speed of 215-72 m.p.h.
AT LYMPNE: The A.N.E.C. II monoplane well away on a test flight.
THE LIGHT 'PLANE RACE FOR THE GROSVENOR CHALLENGE CUP: 5, Bulman rounding the aerodrome tent on the Farnborough "Hurricane";
SOME MACHINES AT THE DAYTON INTERNATIONAL AIR RACES: The "New Swallow"
SOME MACHINES AT THE DAYTON INTERNATIONAL AIR RACES: The racing "Swallow."
The Short "Satellite" monoplane, making a trial flight at Lympne.
A FEW UNORTHODOX TAIL SKIDS ON LYMPNE MACHINES: The Bristol is a leaf-spring and the Avro a bent tube. The Short has a long straight, tubular skid, and the Westlands a horizontal Vee with compression spring to the stern-post.
General Sir Sefton Brancker looks thoroughly pleased after a flight with Capt. Biard in the Supermarine "Sparrow."
SOME MORE CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS FROM LYMPNE: (1) Hinge on lower rear spar for folding wings of Supermarine "Sparrow."
Running-up the engine of No. 5, the Westland "Wood Pigeon."
LOW-SPEED FLYING AT LYMPNE: 4, Gaskell on the Westland "Wood Pigeon"
SOME MORE CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS FROM LYMPNE: (8) External elevator cranks on Westland "Wood Pigeon." Sketch also shows front chassis strut attachment.
A FEW UNORTHODOX TAIL SKIDS ON LYMPNE MACHINES: The Bristol is a leaf-spring and the Avro a bent tube. The Short has a long straight, tubular skid, and the Westlands a horizontal Vee with compression spring to the stern-post.
The Beardmore "Wee Bee" monoplane (Bristol "Cherub") taking off in the eliminating trials at Lympne.
LOW-SPEED FLYING AT LYMPNE: 3, Piercey on the Beardmore "Wee Bee."
THE WINNER: The Beardmore "Wee Bee I," Bristol "Cherub" engine, on which Piercey won first prize in the Lympne Light 'Plane competitions.
The "Office" of the Beardmore "Wee Bee I" is reached by hinging back the central portion of the leading edge, as shown in this photograph.
CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS OF LIGHT 'PLANES AT LYMPNE: (2) Front cockpit covering of Beardmore "Wee Bee I." Leading edge and top cover hinge back for getting into and out of cockpit.
CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS OF LIGHT 'PLANES AT LYMPNE: (5) View into rear cockpit of Beardmore "Wee Bee I," showing spar attachment to top of fuselage This cockpit is covered by a hinged window of celluloid.
SOME MORE CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS FROM LYMPNE: (5) The aileron gap in the "Wee Bee I" is covered with aluminium strips. The aileron is hinged at bottom edge, and is operated direct from upper edge by a pull-and-push rod.
The Light 'Plane Competition, Lympne: The "Cranwell" biplane (Bristol "Cherub"), built by the Cranwell Light Plane Club, starting for a test flight.
LOW-SPEED FLYING AT LYMPNE: 7, Comper on the Cranwell "C.L.A.2."
THE LIGHT 'PLANE RACE FOR THE GROSVENOR CHALLENGE CUP: 1 shows the winner, Bert Hinkler, on the Avro "Avis" (Bristol "Cherub"), starting off in the race
The Avro "Avis" has difficulty in getting "unstuck."
THE LIGHT 'PLANE RACE FOR THE GROSVENOR CHALLENGE CUP: The winner, Bert Hinkler, on the Avro "Avis" (Bristol "Cherub"), crossing the finishing-line first.
CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS OF LIGHT 'PLANES AT LYMPNE: (1) Mounting for Bristol Cherub on Avro "Avis"
CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS OF LIGHT 'PLANES AT LYMPNE: (3) Rudder and elevator hinges on Avro "Avis." The elevator gap is afterwards covered with fabric strip.
A FEW UNORTHODOX TAIL SKIDS ON LYMPNE MACHINES: The Bristol is a leaf-spring and the Avro a bent tube. The Short has a long straight, tubular skid, and the Westlands a horizontal Vee with compression spring to the stern-post.
THE NIEUPORT-DELAGE TYPE 38 BIPLANE: A Service Machine which can be used either as a school machine or for aerial photographic work, etc. By means of an interchangeable body, this machine can also be used for commercial work, carrying two passengers. It is fitted with a 190 h.p. Renault, or 180 h p Hispano-Suiza engine. The main characteristics are: Span, 11-1 m. (36 ft. 5 ins.); length, 8 m (26 ft. 3 ins.); chord, 1-8 m. (6 ft. 0 in.); gap, 2 m. (6 ft. 6 ins.); wing area, 37-8 sq.m. (406-7 sq. ft.); weight empty. 850 kg. (1,874 lbs.); weight loaded 1,250 kg. (2,756 lbs.); weight per h.p., 6.25 kg. (13.8 lbs.); wing loading, 33-1 kg./m2. (6-75 lbs./sq. ft.); speed, 175 km.p.h. (108-75 m.p.h.; climb 1.000 m. (3,280. ft.) 8 mins. 35 secs., 3,000 m. (10,000 ft.), 36 mins. 45 secs.; ceiling, 4,000 m. (13,120 ft.).
SOME MACHINES AT THE DAYTON INTERNATIONAL AIR RACES: The Hartzell FC-1