Flight 1931-08
Flight
The Northrop Alpha is an all-metal aircraft carrying 1,822 lb. useful load. Its cruising speed is 140 m.p.h. with a radius of 700 miles and 116 gall, of fuel. The engine is a Pratt and Whitney Wasp of 420 h.p. With a wing area of 295 sq. ft. the wing loading is 15 25 lb. h.p. and the power loading 10 7 lb./h.p. It is probably one of the most efficient American transport aircraft and has accommodation for 7 passengers.
AN INTERNATIONAL JUNCTION: Schiphol, the airport of Amsterdam, is called at by Fokker machines of many international airlines. The photograph shows in the foreground a K.L.M. Fokker F.VIII, next to it a Fokker F.III belonging to the German Luft Hansa, and a Fokker F.VIIa of the Danske Luftfartselskab. In the second row, from left to right; Fokker F.VIIb-3m Swissair, F.VIIb-3m Sabena (Belgium), F.VIIb-3m Ceskoslovenska Letecka Spolecnost (Czechoslovakia). In the background another Lufthansa F.III.
AN INTERNATIONAL JUNCTION: Schiphol, the airport of Amsterdam, is called at by Fokker machines of many international airlines. The photograph shows in the foreground a K.L.M. Fokker F.VIII, next to it a Fokker F.III belonging to the German Luft Hansa, and a Fokker F.VIIa of the Danske Luftfartselskab. In the second row, from left to right; Fokker F.VIIb-3m Swissair, F.VIIb-3m Sabena (Belgium), F.VIIb-3m Ceskoslovenska Letecka Spolecnost (Czechoslovakia). In the background another Lufthansa F.III.
An Aerial view of Baldonnel Aerodrome. The H.P. W.10 in the foreground was doing joy-riding throughout the meeting piloted by Capt. E. B. Fielden.
WHAT HAS THE ISIS COME TO? The formation flown by members of the O.U.A.S. over the Thames near Sheppey. The instructor can be seen in the leading machine, but the pilots are all undergraduates.
OXFORD IN THE AIR: Formation flying by members of the O.U.A.S. An instructor is in the spare seat of the leading machine but the pilots are all undergraduates.
THE DARK BLUE AEROPLANES: Four "Bristol Fighters" and eight "Lynx-Avros" at Eastchurch. A dark blue line is painted on each fuselage.
Успех S.6B на гонках Шнейдера. 13 сентября 1931г.: С целью в третий раз выиграть для Британии Кубок Шнейдера в гонках принял участие на S.6B флайт-лейтенант Дж. Н. Бутман. Он пролетел маршрут длиной 350 км со средней скоростью 547,305 км/ч. S.6B, улучшенный S.6, был оснащен мотором Rolls-Royce "R" мощностью 2300 л.с. Бутман в 7,5 раз превысил среднюю скорость победителя первых гонок на Кубок Шнейдера, состоявшихся 18 годами ранее.
A VICKERS-SUPERMARINE ROLLS-ROYCE S.6.B.: This seaplane, S1595, is the first of the two new racers to be delivered to the High-Speed Flight at Calshot. other, S1596, was delivered on August 11. The Rolls-Royce "R" engine is housed in the Vickers-Supermarine S.6 B with a minimum loss of space, and in an extremely small frontal area. It was on this actual machine, but with a different Fairey metal airscrew, that Flt.-Lt. Stainforth established a new world's speed record of 408-8 m.p.h.
Создатель S.6B Реджинальд Митчелл позже спроектировал истребитель Spitfire. Тем временем, разработавшая двигатель "R" группа во главе с сэром Генри Ройсом создала для него мотор Merlin.
The second Vickers Supermarine Rolls Royce S.6.B. - Marked S1596.
Гидросамолет S.6B N 51596 - собрат самолета, выигравшего в 1931 году Кубок Шнейдера. На этой машине лейтенант Джордж Стейнфорт 29 сентября 1931 года установил абсолютный мировой рекорд скорости - 655,87 км/ч.
The second Vickers Supermarine Rolls-Royce S.6. "B" - Marked S1596.
THE FIRST VICKERS SUPERMARINE ROLLS ROYCE S.6.B. - MARKED S1595: Flight-Lieut. Long in the cockpit. August 1931.
The Squadron in formation near Tangmere.
GETTING READY FOR A FLIGHT: The men of No. 600 B.S. are tremendously keen.
The Officers of No. 600 (City of London) (Bomber) Squadron in Camp at Tangmere.
The Airmen of No. 600 (City of London) (Bomber) Squadron: All but about a dozen are City clerks, and they maintain their "Wapitis" and "Jupiters" in fine condition.
THE WINNER: The Klemm L.26 Va (Argus As 8) which Lieutenant Dinort flew to victory.
THE WINNER: Oskar Dinort and his passenger Freiherr von Houwald.
THIRD MAN HOME AGAIN: Adolph Kneip greeted on his arrival at Tempelhof upon his getting third place in the "Deutschlandflug."
THE FOLDING AND "DOOR-WHEELING" TEST: Kneip's machine going through the "gate."
FIRST IN THE TECHNICAL TESTS: Reinhold Poss (Klemm-Argus) secured the highest number of points in the technical tests.
IN THE LANDING TEST: This year competitors did not have to land over an obstacle.
ENGINE-STARTING TEST: Propeller-swinging was not permitted. Wolf Hirth's Hirth engine being started.
SECOND PRIZE: Wolf Hirth secured second place on the Klemm fitted with the engine designed by his brother Hellmuth Hirth, who is seen standing on the left.
Some of the Competitors at Staaken Aerodrome before the Start.
THE NEW HANDLEY PAGE 42, WESTERN MODEL: An interior view of the aft cabin looking aft. This machine accommodates 38 passengers.
Mr. T. H. Naylor (Liverpool) and his "Puss Moth" at Hooton.
ROYAL AVIATORS: Princess Ileana and her husband, the Archduke Anton of Hapsburg, standing beside their "Puss Moth," a wedding gift from King Carol.
THE FASTEST IN THE RACE: Mr. Thornton, designer, and Fit. Lt. Wincott (R.) in front of the Arrow Active before the race.
Miss W. Brown's "Sports Avian" fills up with National Benzole at Hooton.
This side view shows that the robustness common to all Avro aircraft has not been sacrificed although exceptionally clean lines have been obtained.
The clean lines and low head resistance, in spite of the large radial engine fitted to the Avro "627" are well depicted in the photographs.
The attention which has been paid to the reduction of drag can be seen by the double form of Townend Ring and the "spats" over the wheels.
The side panels of the fuselage may be quickly and easily detached to expose all pipes and control rods for adjustment and maintenance.
THE ENGINE MOUNTING: Simplicity with efficiency has obviously been maintained throughout in constructing the Avro 627, as the details of the engine mounting will show.
THE UNDERCARRIAGE: Simplicity with efficiency has obviously been maintained throughout in constructing the Avro 627, as the details of the undercarriage will show.
THE TAIL WHEEL: The construction of the tail wheel springing can be seen here as well as the tail-plane incidence gear.
WING DETAILS: The strip steel spars and duralumin ribs exemplify Avro workmanship.
Our photograph shows the mail compartment with the lid open. This lid folds again twice and so does not impede loading up of the compartment.
WHEEL DETAILS: On the left the sketch shows the method of attaching the streamline fairing over the landing wheels, while on the right the tail wheel and its springing is shown. The hollow steel fork carrying the wheel (see small sketch) is shown cut through in order that the method of attaching the fairing to a transverse plate may be understood.
ON BALL BEARINGS: The aileron and elevator hinges are of the ball bearing type, and are not divided, the balls being put into the bearing at the coincidence of a groove in the centre sleeve and a notch in the outer race.
TWO IMPORTANT JOINTS: That on the left takes the front pair of flying wires and that on the right the front spar of the bottom plane on the Avro "627."
THE HEATING SYSTEM: The hot air is brought in under the foot boards from a muff round the exhaust pipe, and the supply is controlled by a butterfly valve.
Avro "Mail Plane" Armstrong Siddeley 525 hp "Jaguar Major" Engine
THE WINNER: Colombo's "Breda 33" (Gipsy III), with cockpits open. Transparent panels turn the machine into a cabin monoplane.
MINISTERIAL INTEREST: General Balbo, Italy's Air Minister, examining one of the "Breda 33" machines.
IL DUCE AS A STARTER: Signor Mussolini dropping his flag and starting Meleri off.
ON THE WAY: One of the "Breda 33's" (Gipsy III) in flight.
AT REST: One of the "Breda 33's" with wings (what little there is of them) folded.
Breda 33 Gipsy III Engine
AN INTERNATIONAL JUNCTION: Schiphol, the airport of Amsterdam, is called at by Fokker machines of many international airlines. The photograph shows in the foreground a K.L.M. Fokker F.VIII, next to it a Fokker F.III belonging to the German Luft Hansa, and a Fokker F.VIIa of the Danske Luftfartselskab. In the second row, from left to right; Fokker F.VIIb-3m Swissair, F.VIIb-3m Sabena (Belgium), F.VIIb-3m Ceskoslovenska Letecka Spolecnost (Czechoslovakia). In the background another Lufthansa F.III.
THE TRANS-CANADA AIR TOUR: The Fairchild 21, fitted with an Armstrong-Siddeley "Genet" Major and Townend Ring, which also took-part.
NOT HANDLEY PAGE AND NOT LACHMANN: The Messerschmitt machine flown by Croneiss was fitted with an auxiliary aerofoil above the main wing, placed at approximately one-third chord length back from the leading edge.
A NEW TYPE: The Messerschmitt M. 27 flown by Theo Croneiss.
A NEW TYPE IN THE COMPETITION: The BFW-Messerschmitt 27 flown by Theo Croneiss was fitted with "spats."
A NEW TYPE IN THE COMPETITION: The BFW-Messerschmitt 27. The control cables could be inspected through the flap doors near the tail.
THE DARK BLUE AEROPLANES: Four "Bristol Fighters" and eight "Lynx-Avros" at Eastchurch. A dark blue line is painted on each fuselage.
IN FLIGHT: The Focke-Wulf A38 "Mowe." The machine shows the usual wing plan form adopted by this firm from the Zanonia seed leaf.
THE COCKPIT: View from the forward luggage compartment, showing dual controls, etc.
Focke Wulf A38 "Mowe" Siemens "Jupiter VI" Engine
THE "CHEETAH" CLUB: These four airmen of No. 600 B.S. learnt to fly, and bought the Clarke "Cheetah" for their own use.
THE MOTH TRAINER: A side view of this machine. By taking the exhaust pipe down in front, the port side of the fuselage is left unencumbered, and it is possible for the occupants to get in and out on either side.
THE END OF A STRENUOUS FLIGHT: Mr. Mollison arrives at Croydon on his Gipsy-Moth after flying from Australia to England in 8 days 19 hours 25 minutes.
THE SKY PILOT: A "Gipsy Moth," Sky Pilot, which has been put into use in mission work on the Roper River, Northern Australia, by the Rev. K. Langford Smith (in rear cockpit). The photo was taken from a Shell "Moth" after taking off from Essendon for its new field of operations.
SOLD AT THE BUENOS AIRES EXHIBITION: A Gipsy Moth being towed to the aerodrome, from which it was flown to the Moron aerodrome by the de Havilland representative, Mr. Ballantyne (seen in the back of car), there to be handed over to the purchaser.
AT THE WASSERKUPPE: Herr Wolf Hirth, recently returned from America, is making a fairly sharp turn on the Grunau and is seen over the open girder tail of a practice glider during the competitions now being held by the Rhon-Rossitten Gesellschaft.
THE SCUD: That excellent little high efficiency glider, the Scud, designed by Mr. Baynes, is now in production in the works of E. D. Abbott, Ltd., at Farnham, Surrey. The photographs show the fuselage assembly, and the wing shop, while above there are views of the trailer and the Scud in flight.
AT THE WASSERKUPPE: Herr Wolf Hirth, recently returned from America, is making a fairly sharp turn on the Grunau and is seen over the open girder tail of a practice glider during the competitions now being held by the Rhon-Rossitten Gesellschaft.
M. Louis Bleriot visited Orly in his Bleriot Guillemin Monoplane (95 h.p. Renault) piloted by Lucien Bossoutrot.