Aeroplane Monthly 1980-01
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Personal album
This Junkers Ju 52/3m fuselage was photographed at Woodley in 1948, or thereabouts. It is believed that it was used by the newly-formed Air Britain as their HQ. Note the remains of the tandem-wing Miles M.39B Libellula in front of the aircraft.
The famous Southend graveyard seen on August 6, 1952. Halifax Mk IX RT816/G-AMCG and a sister aircraft await the scrap-man's attentions.
Avro 683 Tudor 4 G-AHNJ was operated by BSAA and named Star Panther. It was finally reduced to spares at Ringway in 1953, but is seen here at Hurn on July 31, 1952.
Avro 688 Tudor 4 G-AHNN, BSAA's Star Leopard, passed to the Ministry of Civil Aviation in November 1951 and is seen at Hum on July 31, 1952, looking rather sorry for itself.
Tudor 4B G-AGRF, in the colours of BSAA, was originally a Tudor I flying with BOAC as Elizabeth of England. It was converted to 4B status in 1948, and is seen here at Hum on July 31, 1952.
This Junkers Ju 52/3m fuselage was photographed at Woodley in 1948, or thereabouts. It is believed that it was used by the newly-formed Air Britain as their HQ. Note the remains of the tandem-wing Miles M.39B Libellula in front of the aircraft.
Originally a Short S.25 Sunderland, G-AGKX was operated by BOAC during the latter half of the war bearing the marks ML788/OQZF until converted to a Sandringham I in 1945. Named Himalaya, it soldiered on with BOAC until purchased by Aquila Airways. This company flew the aircraft for four years until it was withdrawn from use in March 1953. It is seen at Hamble on July 25, 1953, a week before being reduced to produce.
An unidentified Sandringham I seen at Hamble on July 25, 1953.