Flight 1931-11
Flight
COLCHESTER: The Blue Barns Aerodrome at Colchester is now the sales depot of the Redwing Aircraft Co., Ltd., for all territory north of London. Here is shown a group of Redwings when the depot was opened by Flt.-Lt. Russell.
"FORMATING": The two new Autogiros are here seen taking off at Stag Lane aerodrome, the C.24 piloted by Senor de la Cierva and the C.19 Mark IV by Captain Rawson.
THE MEANS. The Saro "Windhover" (three Gipsy II's) at anchor in Gibraltar harbour. Beyond her is a Dornier "Wal" which operates on the line Gibraltar to Genoa, meeting the New York mail boat on her outward trip and then remaining at Gibraltar until the incoming ship arrives.
AN OLD IDEA REVIVED: The view of the Focke-Wulf "Ente" during its visit to Hanworth. In the photograph the machine is climbing, but not nearly as steeply as it did on some occasions.
WILL IT COME TO THIS?: A FLIGHT Artist's conception of the result of combining three types which seek to avoid stalling and spinning; the Autogiro, the "Ente" and the Pterodactyl. The name might be something short and snappy, like "Pteroautogirentedactyl."
LAUNCHING THE "VILDEBEEST": The machine is run down the slipway on its beaching wheels. Note the water rudders on the floats. The pilot's cockpit is in front of the wings, just behind the engine.
TAKING OFF: This photograph shows the good view forward and downward from the pilot's cockpit.
THE "VILDEBEEST" IN FLIGHT: The shape of the float bottoms, steps, etc., may be seen in this photograph.
GOOD LINES: When one becomes accustomed to the downward slope forward resulting from the installation of the Gipsy III engine, the "Tiger Moth" is of pleasing appearance.
THREE-QUARTER REAR VIEW: Both planes are swept back, but only the lower has a dihedral.
THE NEW "TIGER MOTH": This three-quarter front view shows the small obstruction to view presented by the Gipsy III engine.
THE CLEAR EXITS: The new dropped doors, the staggered wings, and the shifting of the rear lift wire to a forward point, have resulted in a very free passage out of the machine from the front as well as from the rear cockpit.
THE GENERAL LAY-OUT: This side elevation indicates the arrangement of the cockpits, etc.
D.H. Tiger Moth Gipsy III Engine
INSTALLED IN A KLEMM MONOPLANE: The Hirth engine makes a very fine power plant for this machine, and is very smooth and quiet in running. Note the accessibility when the one-piece cowl is opened.
THE RECORD BREAKERS: Miss Peggy Salaman and Mr. Gordon Store taken on their arrival at Cape Town on November 5, when they beat the record for the England-Cape flight, with 5 days 6 hours 40 minutes, in the D.H. Puss Moth "Good Hope."
A Fokker Super-Universal of the S.M.A.T. Co. This type is not now used, as the ply-wood wing did not stand the climatic conditions well.
FOR THE VICEROY OF INDIA: The Avro 10 which left Croydon for India, piloted by Mr. Nevill Vincent, on Nov. 20. This machine is intended for the personal use of Lord Willingdon, Viceroy of India.
THE BLACKBURN DEMONSTRATION TOUR: Capt. Stack shows the "Lincock" to Maj. Kazer at Brussels while Mr. Robert Blackburn stands gracefully by in the background.
AN AMERICAN BOMBER: Two views of the second of the new Boeing all-metal, low-wing monoplane bomber, seven of which have been ordered by the U.S. Army Air Corps. With a wing-span of seventy-six feet and powered with two "Hornet" engines, the bomber carries a crew of five and can transport two 1,000-pound bombs. Performance figures are not released, but it is claimed that the bomber is substantially faster than any present type of bombing plane. It has retractable landing wheels.
"FORMATING": The two new Autogiros are here seen taking off at Stag Lane aerodrome, the C.24 piloted by Senor de la Cierva and the C.19 Mark IV by Captain Rawson.
FOREIGN INTEREST IN THE AUTOGIRO: A small French mission recently visited England to study the Cierva machines. Here some of its members are seen with representatives of the Cierva company. From left to right: P. Cour, G. Prat, L. Bourdin, J. de la Cierva, G. Lepere, and A. H. Rawson.
WILL IT COME TO THIS?: A FLIGHT Artist's conception of the result of combining three types which seek to avoid stalling and spinning; the Autogiro, the "Ente" and the Pterodactyl. The name might be something short and snappy, like "Pteroautogirentedactyl."
Butler's Flight to Australia: The Comper "Swift" with 75-h.p. Pobjoy "R" engine.
DAVID CHALLENGES GOLIATH: Mr. C. A. Butler hopes to beat the existing record for a flight to Australia. He has chosen a Comper "Swift" with Pobjoy engine, the smallest aircraft ever to attempt the flight to Australia.
He made the record flight flying in his carpet slippers!
Butler's Flight to Australia: The special drinking-water supply on this machine.
Butler's Flight to Australia: The assortment of Smith's aero instruments
The Sikorsky S.40 Amphibian (four 575 h.p. Pratt and Whitney "Hornet" engines).
THE JUNKERS ALTITUDE MONOPLANE: This view of the Ju. 49 show the machine to be generally similar to previous Junkers types. The main exception, in external appearance, is the undercarriage. At present the machine is being tested as an ordinary aircraft at normal altitudes, and it will be some time before the final altitude equipment, supercharger, &c, is installed.
The Fairchild 71A (Wasp) on skiis, in use by S.M.A.T.
THE "CUTTY SARK" AT SINGAPORE: The Singapore Flying Club is using a Saro "Cutty Sark" - loaned by the Straits Settlements Government - for advanced training.
A TOPSY-TURVY WORLD: Herr Achgelis has gained fame in Germany by his extraordinary upside-down flying very close to the ground. He approaches the aerodrome in an inverted dive, and when a few feet from the ground does a bunt into the upright position, from which he half-loops again into the inverted position. The machine is a Focke-Wulf "Kiebitz," with wings of bi-convex section, specially strengthened for these evolutions. Herr Achgelis (left) is seen in the larger photograph flying upside-down at Heston. On this occasion he was flying quite high.
WILL IT COME TO THIS?: A FLIGHT Artist's conception of the result of combining three types which seek to avoid stalling and spinning; the Autogiro, the "Ente" and the Pterodactyl. The name might be something short and snappy, like "Pteroautogirentedactyl."
THE MEANS. The Saro "Windhover" (three Gipsy II's) at anchor in Gibraltar harbour. Beyond her is a Dornier "Wal" which operates on the line Gibraltar to Genoa, meeting the New York mail boat on her outward trip and then remaining at Gibraltar until the incoming ship arrives.
A FIRST PUBLIC APPEARANCE: The Saro-Percival three-engined monoplane (Gipsy III) paid a visit to Heston on Saturday last, piloted by Mr. Percival himself, who had just brought the machine over from Martlesham where it had been undergoing official tests. Ability to fly on any two of the three engines is one of the features of this machine.
A GRAND NATIONAL AVIATION DASH: The Premier, Mr. Ramsay MacDonald, leaving Seaham for London in a "Moth," with a 6,000 majority in his pocket. In spite of the heavy load the machine made good progress.
A BELGIAN PRIVATE OWNER: M. Gaston Roelandts and his D.H. "Moth" pays a flying visit to his grandmother, the dowager Baronne Ewen-Coppee, at Chateau de Roumont, Belgian Ardennes.
Egyptian Army Air Service: The nucleus of the new service will consist of some Egyptian pilots, who have been taught to fly in England, and a small fleet of "Gipsy Moths." Five of these which were delivered at Stag Lane on November 3, are shown in the photograph.
The photograph shows from right to left Dr. Hafiz Afifi Pasha, the Egyptian Minister in London, Gen. Sir Charton W. Spinks, K.B.E., D.S.O., Inspector-General of the Egyptian Army, Air Commodore Board (in black coat), three Egyptian pilots, Fit. Lt. Stocks, and Mr. C. C. Walker, of the de Havilland Aircraft Co., Ltd.
THE NEW FORD FREIGHTER: The type 8-A is a single-engined version of earlier Ford types. The engine is a 650 h.p. Hispano-Suiza, with which the tare weight is 6,100 lb. and the permissible gross weight 11,000 lb. Out of the disposable load of 4,900 lb., the pay load may be 3,500 lb., when the range is 500 miles.