тут натяжные потолки цены с установкой
Flight 1927-10
Flight
AMSTERDAM-BATAVIA IN TEN DAYS: As previously recorded in FLIGHT, Lieut. Koppen of the Dutch R.A.F. recently accomplished a splendid flight from Amsterdam to Batavia, in a Fokker monoplane fitted with three Armstrong-Siddeley "Lynx" engines. Carrying mails, he covered the 9,000 miles in 10 days. (1) The Fokker FVII-3.M in flight. (2) The crew - from left to right, 2nd-pilot (K.L.M.) Fryns, Lt. Koppen, and mechanic Elleman - and the three British engines which carried them through so successfully. (3) The four extra petrol tanks in the fuselage. (4) A side view of the Fokker F.VII-3.M.
SHERBURN AIR PAGEANT: (6) Mrs. Eliott-Lynn winning the Wattle Handicap
SHERBURN AIR PAGEANT: (4) Flying Officer Scroggs again winning in the Open Handicap;
SHERBURN AIR PAGEANT: (3) Flying Officer Scroggs winning the Private Owners' Handicap on S.E.5a "QM"
SHERBURN AIR PAGEANT: (7) shows the line-up for the Wattle Handicap
SCHNEIDER WELCOME: Col. Henderson, on an Avro, provided some excitement by taking off and flying around over the aerodrome (sometimes driven backward by the strong wind) trailing a huge "Daily News" banner with the words "Bravo Webster" on it.
THE BRITISH SCHNEIDER TEAM: This photograph, taken at St. Andrea, shows the two types of British machines in the race, the Gloster IV on the left and the Supermarine S.5 on the right. In front of the machines are seen, among others: First Row - L. E. Coombes, Capt. Forsythe (Air Ministry), Flying-Officer Schofield, Flight-Lieut. Kinkead, Wing-Commander Fletcher, Flight-Lieut. Worsley (second in the race), Air Vice-Marshal Scarlett (Commander of the R.A.F. team), Flight-Lieut. Webster (winner of the race), Sqdn.-Ldr. Slatter, Flying-Officer Moon (Technical Officer of the team), Maj. Buchanan (Air Ministry) Mr. Ransome, and Mr. Reason. Second Row Mr. E. Scott, Sir Harry Brittain (Director of Napiers), Mr. Vane (Managing Director of Napiers), Mr. Folland (designer of the Gloster IV), Mr. Mitchell (designer of Supermarine S.5), Commander Bird (Managing Director of the Supermarine firm) and Mr. R. E. G. Smith.
THE RETURN OF THE SCHNEIDER TEAM: The Armstrong-Whitworth "Argosy" of Imperial Airways, Ltd., arrives at Croydon aerodrome, escorted by six Gloster "Grebes" and a de Havilland 50. Considering the extremely gusty wind, the "Grebes" kept excellent formation.
THE RETURN OF THE SCHNEIDER TEAM: The Armstrong-Whitworth "Argosy" of Imperial Airways, Ltd., arrives at Croydon aerodrome, escorted by six Gloster "Grebes" and a de Havilland 50. Considering the extremely gusty wind, the "Grebes" kept excellent formation.
BRISTOL CLUB'S AIR DAY: These are two general views of the machines which took part at the meeting at Filton, giving an idea of how representative the machines were of the light aeroplane class.
SHERBURN AIR PAGEANT: (2) Mr. B. Martin of the Nottingham Aero Club, winning the race on the Club's Moth "SK.";
BRISTOL CLUB OPENS: Here is Mr. W. E. Bartlett, the pilot instructor to the Club, and a close view of his crazy flying in the Club's Moth, which delighted the crowd.
SHERBURN AIR PAGEANT: (5) Miss Woodhead (left) winning the Ladies' Race from Miss O'Brien, both on Moths;
Mr. D. Kittel taken beside the nose of his own "Moth X," called Silvry 3, on his arrival at Stag Lane after the successful completion of his latest European tour. He was one of the first private owners to learn to fly at Stag Lane with the London Aeroplane Club, and has about 400 hours' flying to his credit.
A NEW PARNALL MACHINE: Several unusual features are found in the "Pike," a biplane produced both as a seaplane and as a landplane. The engine is a Napier "Lion." Note the strut bracing which avoids lift and antilift wires. The propeller is a Fairey-Reed.
THE BRISTOL MEETING: The top picture shows Capt. Paget, the new test pilot to the Westland Company, performing on a Westland "Widgeon," and below are three of the four "Widgeons" which arrived in formation.
BRISTOL CLUB'S AIR DAY: These are two general views of the machines which took part at the meeting at Filton, giving an idea of how representative the machines were of the light aeroplane class.
THE BLACKBURN "RIPON": Fitted with Napier "Lion" engine, this machine is produced both as a seaplane and as a landplane
THE BLACKBURN "RIPON": Fitted with Napier "Lion" engine, this machine is produced both as a seaplane and as a landplane. Note the water rudders on the heels of the floats in the seaplane version.
THE ITALIAN DEFENDERS: Three-quarter front view of the Macchi M.52. The wings are slightly swept back. The floats are of wood construction.
THE ITALIAN DEFENDERS: Front and rear views of the Macchi M.52, fitted with Fiat engine. The undercarriage has two horizontal struts in place of the streamline wires used in the Supermarine S3.
The Italian Defenders: The Fiat engine installed in one of the Macchi M.52 monoplanes. With the cowling removed a good idea of the installation is obtained.
ROUND THE WORLD IN SIX WEEKS: Two snapshots received from Col. Broke-Smith in India showing, on the left, the "Pride of Detroit" monoplane of William Brock and Edward Schlee landing at Dum Dum Aerodrome Calcutta, during the flight from Detroit to Tokyo; and on the right the Acting Consul General (U.S.A.) shaking hands with Schlee. The two airmen proceeded from Tokyo to San Francisco by steamer, and then continued in their machine to Detroit, arriving back there after an absence of six weeks.
BRISTOL CLUB'S MEETING: Mr. Hollindrake taking up a passenger in an Avro "Avian."
FLIGHT TO AUSTRALIA: An Avro "Avian" light aeroplane will leave Croydon within the next few days on a flight to Australia. The pilot is Capt. W. N. Lancaster, R.A.F. (Res.), and the passenger is Mrs. Keith Miller, wife of a well-known Australian journalist. The machine is fitted with a 32/80 h.p. Cirrus engine, and is a standard machine except for having larger tanks fitted. The route will be via Paris, Lyons, Marseilles, Rome, Naples, Malta, Khoms and Benghasi in African Italy, Sollum in Egypt, thence via Irak, Persia, Calcutta, Singapore, the Dutch East Indies, to Port Darwin, Australia, and it is planned that the flight will take from five to six weeks. The "Avian" will carry a letter from the High Commissioner in London to the Prime Minister of the Commonwealth of Australia. It has been christened the "Red Rose," as Capt. Lancaster is a Lancastrian.
To Australia by Light Aeroplane: Capt.W.N. Lancaster and his passenger, Mrs. Keith Miller, in their "Red Rose" before the departure for Australia from Croydon on October 14. In this Avro "Avian" they reached Pisa from Marseilles on October 19, and Rome and Naples the next day. On October 21 Catania in Sicily was gained, and Malta the following day. On October 24 the "Red Rose" reached Tripoli, North Africa. This "Avian" is fitted with the Cirrus 32/80 h.p. engine. Capt. Lancaster is an officer in the Air Force Reserve and his passenger is the wife of a well-known Australian journalist.
STILL MORE REFINEMENT: When the de Havilland "Tiger Moth" first made its appearance it was difficult to see where further head resistance could be saved. As a matter of fact, it is believed that a good deal more has been saved by refinements recently incorporated, such as the new engine cowling and the fairing of the pilot's head. Capt. Broad, who is seen in the cockpit, states that there is now no draught at all in the machine, while the view is still reasonably good. It is likely that something will be heard of the machine shortly in connection with a new record attempt.
BRISTOL CLUB'S MEETING: The Blackburn "Bluebird" in which Sir Sefton Brancker flew down from London, piloted by Capt. Stockbridge.
BRISTOL CLUB'S AIR DAY: These are two general views of the machines which took part at the meeting at Filton, giving an idea of how representative the machines were of the light aeroplane class.
THE RETURN OF THE SCHNEIDER TEAM: The Armstrong-Whitworth "Argosy" of Imperial Airways, Ltd., arrives at Croydon aerodrome, escorted by six Gloster "Grebes" and a de Havilland 50. Considering the extremely gusty wind, the "Grebes" kept excellent formation.
A BRISTOL EVENT: Mr. C. F. Unwins flying "QT" during the meeting.
BRISTOL'S AIR MEETING: Capt. F. Barnwell, the famous Bristol designer, giving an exhibition on the Bristol "Brownie."
THE BRITISH SCHNEIDER TEAM: This photograph, taken at St. Andrea, shows the two types of British machines in the race, the Gloster IV on the left and the Supermarine S.5 on the right. In front of the machines are seen, among others: First Row - L. E. Coombes, Capt. Forsythe (Air Ministry), Flying-Officer Schofield, Flight-Lieut. Kinkead, Wing-Commander Fletcher, Flight-Lieut. Worsley (second in the race), Air Vice-Marshal Scarlett (Commander of the R.A.F. team), Flight-Lieut. Webster (winner of the race), Sqdn.-Ldr. Slatter, Flying-Officer Moon (Technical Officer of the team), Maj. Buchanan (Air Ministry) Mr. Ransome, and Mr. Reason. Second Row Mr. E. Scott, Sir Harry Brittain (Director of Napiers), Mr. Vane (Managing Director of Napiers), Mr. Folland (designer of the Gloster IV), Mr. Mitchell (designer of Supermarine S.5), Commander Bird (Managing Director of the Supermarine firm) and Mr. R. E. G. Smith.
SHERBURN AIR PAGEANT: (1) This shows the line up for the President's Light Aeroplane Handicap;
THE R.A.F. FAR EAST CRUISE: Two views of the Supermarine "Southampton" twin-Napier flying-boat in flight.
THE R.A.F. FAR EAST CRUISE: A Supermarine "Southampton" alighting.
The R.A.F. FAR EAST CRUISE: Three views of one of the four Supermarine "Southampton" twin-Napier-engined metal hull flying-boats which are making a flight to India and Australia. The beaching trolley shown in the photographs will not be carried on board, but will be sent forward for use where beaching is planned.
THE R.A.F. FLIGHT TO THE FAR EAST: Three views of the Supermarine "Southampton" metal hull flying-boat on the water. The engines are Napier "Lions."
THE R.A.F. FAR EAST CRUISE: Group of officers making the flight. In front of them is a model of the Supermarine "Southampton" twin-Napier-engined flying-boat used. From left to right: Flight.-Lieut. C. G. Wigglesworth, A.F.C., Flight-Lieut. D. V. Carnegie, A.F.C., Squad.-Leader G. E. Livock, D.F.C. (Second-in-Command), F./O. B. Cheesman, M.B.E., Group Capt. H. M. Cave-Browne-Cave, D.S.C., D.F.C. (in Command of the Flight), Flight-Lieut. H. G. Sawyer, A.F.C., Flight-Lieut. P. E. Maitland, A.F.C., F./O. S. D. Scott, F./O. G. E. Nicholetts, F./O. L. Horwood, M.C., Flight.-Lieut. S. T. Freeman, M.B.E.
THE SIKORSKY S.36.B FLYING-BOAT: Two models are shown: left, the open type, and, right, the enclosed amphibian.
THE SIKORSKY S.36.B FLYING-BOAT: Three-quarter rear view of the open type. It is fitted with two Wright "Whirlwind" engines.
Sikorsky S.36.B Amphibian 2 Wright "Whirlwind" Engines
Sherburn Air Pageant: Two R.A.F. officers, Flight-Lieuts. Lydford and Fogarty, put up a thrilling exhibition of crazy flying both on the ground and above. Here Flight-Lieut. Fogarty is seen landing on one wheel in the Avro-Lynx.
REFLECTIONS OF GOOD DESIGN: The Short "Sturgeon" is a three-seater amphibian Reconnaissance biplane of all-metal construction. It is fitted with a Bristol "Jupiter" radial air-cooled engine.
The Short "Sturgeon" amphibian three-seater reconnaissance biplane. The engine is a Bristol "Jupiter."
THE SHORT "STURGEON": In this three-quarter rear view the shape of the floats is well brought out. Note the special small-wheel trolleys used for handling in shed and on slipway.
A GERMAN ATLANTIC ATTEMPT: On October 12, the German pilot Merz left Warnemunde in a Heinkel H.E.6 D-1220 seaplane, 830 h.p. Packard (not a Junkers, as previously reported) for America, via the Azores, and is a present held up at Lisbon. Our pictures show: (Top) the machine starting on its flight; (left), wireless operator Bock and pilot Merz; (right), filling up with 4.000 litres (882 gals.) of fuel.