Air Enthusiast 2006-05
A.Ord-Hume - Folland's Civil Side /Paper planes/
Perhaps because its designer was an Egyptian national, Helmy Aerogypt G-AFFG continued its development through the war. Illustrated is its Mk.III incarnation, last flown in September 1940. Work started again in 1943 when it became the Mk.IV with tricycle undercarriage. There is an AW Ensign in the background
The Fo.124 design was conceived in mid-1946. In April 1967 Beagle flew the first Pup, which was aimed at a very similar market. In the background is a Pup 150 for Sweden, and in the foreground is a Pup 160 for the Iranian Civil Air Training Organisation.
Folland's last design for Gloster was the F5/34 fighter, which first flew in December 1937.
The prototype Heston Phoenix, G-ADAD, first flown in August 1935. Only six of this five-seater with retractable undercarriage were built.
The prototype DHA Drover (left) with a production example. To the right is a DH.84 Dragon - one of the types the Drover was designed to replace
One of the Folland 43/37 purpose-built engine test-beds.
An example of H P Folland's work while with Gloster, the prototype Gambet naval fighter of 1927. The type was built under licence for the Japanese Navy by Nakajima.
The prototype DHA Drover (left) with a production example. To the right is a DH.84 Dragon - one of the types the Drover was designed to replace
Quick off the mark in the UK's post-war light aircraft market was the Chrislea Ace. The prototype, G-AHLG, first flew in September 1946. Despite considerable development, production amounted to just over 30 units.
The types most associated with H P Folland were the Midge (illustrated) and Gnat trainer/lightweight fighters.
The one-off Portsmouth Aerocar Major six-seater twin first took to the skies in June 1947.
The ten-seat Cunliffe-Owen Concordia (see here wearing 'B-condition' markings Y-0222) first flew in May 1947. It was the only one of its type completed.
Fo.124
Fo.127
Fo.130
Perhaps because its designer was an Egyptian national, Helmy Aerogypt G-AFFG continued its development through the war. Illustrated is its Mk.III incarnation, last flown in September 1940. Work started again in 1943 when it became the Mk.IV with tricycle undercarriage. There is an AW Ensign in the background
Percival pitched its P.48 Merganser at the same marketplace the Fo.122 was intended for. G-AHMH first flew in May 1947 but was not followed up. The design led to the larger Prince and Pembroke family.