Air International 1999-05
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P.Butowski - Kamovs for the Navy /Military aviation/
Search-and-rescue Ka-27PS are fitted with a 300kg electric winch and carry two radio marker buoys under the tailboom. A third buoy, carried in the rear of the tailboom, is a standard feature of other Helix variants and is ejected in the event of the helicopter sinking.
First prototype of the Ka-27, the D2-01, differs from later production helicopters in having a Ka-25 forward fuselage section. It also lacks the fin leading edge slots of later models.
Cockpits of the three basic Helix variants have almost identical instrumentation and controls for the pilot (left hand seat). The right hand stations are configured to suit specific versions: Anti-submarine Ka-27. Large radar screen with rubber shield dominates the navigator's station.
Kamov's shipborne helicopters, from the Ka-8 to the Ka-60.
Cockpits of the three basic Helix variants have almost identical instrumentation and controls for the pilot (left hand seat). The right hand stations are configured to suit specific versions: Attack Ka-29. The monocular eyepiece of the anti-tank missiles sight replaces the radar display. Note also ASP-17VK gunsight above the pilot’s instrument panel.
Kamov's shipborne helicopters, from the Ka-8 to the Ka-60.
Certificated Ka-27PVs, such as the one illustrated here have been given Ka-32A designations. It is a 320km zone surveillance helicopter and can carry additional fuel, unguided rockets or gun packs on four side outriggers. The Kh-35 anti-ship missiles displayed alongside the helicopter are indicative of the Ka-27PV’s potential, rather than its proven capability.
Ka-60 prototype 601 Red during an early test flight. The Ka-60 marked a departure from the traditional Kamov co-axial rotor configuration but was necessitated by the demand for low drag to achieve high speeds. The prototype flew with a four-bladed main rotor but production models will have a five-blade assembly.
Kamov Ka-60
Kamov's shipborne helicopters, from the Ka-8 to the Ka-60.
Ka-25PL helicopters at Kamov’s workshop in May 1974. They are seen being converted into Ka-25BShZ minesweeping variants for operations in the Suez Canal.
Kamov's shipborne helicopters, from the Ka-8 to the Ka-60.
This view of a Ka-31 shows the Oko radar antenna in its operating position
This view of a Ka-31 shows the Oko radar antenna is stowed in its cruising position.
Cockpits of the three basic Helix variants have almost identical instrumentation and controls for the pilot (left hand seat). The right hand stations are configured to suit specific versions: Early warning Ka-31. System operator has only a modest display because target data is transmitted directly to the command centre on the ship and is not processed on board the helicopter.
Kamov's shipborne helicopters, from the Ka-8 to the Ka-60.
Note the retracted nose undercarriage on the Ka-25Ts which prevents interference with operation of the Uspekh-2A radar. The cylindrical antenna below the rear of the fuselage contains the Kobalt-2 missile guidance transmitter.
Kamov's shipborne helicopters, from the Ka-8 to the Ka-60.
Twin fins are the main distinguishing feature of the Ka-10 when compared with the Ka-8. To facilitate emergency evacuation of the Ka-8 or Ka-10 in flight the seat back was designed to fold allowing the pilot to fall out backwards with his parachute. The Ka-10M is seen here landing on a truck platform in 1955.
Kamov's shipborne helicopters, from the Ka-8 to the Ka-60.
Seen in the foreground, the Ka-18 was a four-seat civilian derivative of the Ka-15. Note the Ka-15 taking-off in the background.
Kamov's shipborne helicopters, from the Ka-8 to the Ka-60.
First of Nikolay Kamov’s helicopters, the single-seat Ka-8 Irkutianin. Mikhail Gurov is at the controls.
Kamov's shipborne helicopters, from the Ka-8 to the Ka-60.
Currently in production for Russia's Federal Border Guard Service and Army, the Ka-137 remotely-piloted surveillance helicopter is powered by a 65hp Hirth 2706R05 piston engine and has a time on station (50km from base) of 4 hours.
Kamov's shipborne helicopters, from the Ka-8 to the Ka-60.
Seen in the foreground, the Ka-18 was a four-seat civilian derivative of the Ka-15. Note the Ka-15 taking-off in the background.
Model of the tandem-rotor configured V-50 multi-role helicopter intended for use by both the Navy and Army.