Air Enthusiast 2007-02
D.Willis - Extended Family /Post-war combat/ (3)
The RCAF operated two Comets, though it used them only briefly
Although the vast majority of C-135s were built as tankers, 48 were delivered in two-transport configuration for MATS, among them 30 C-135Bs (including 61-2663).
Although the ‘Argus 2' carried unusual artwork on its nose, its most distinctive feature was the two large windows mounted in the cargo door.
C-135E 60-0375 became the ‘Argus 2' in 1992 and was involved in projects related to the ‘Star Wars' programme.
While several aircraft have undertaken the 'Speckled' Trout role, the most famous is C-135C 61-2669, resplendent in a highly-polished scheme of white and natural metal.
C-135C 61-2669 carried a Department of the Air Force seal on its modified cargo door, as befitting the personal aircraft of the service's commander.
'Speckled Trout' was equipped with the HAVE SIREN anti-missile system on the pylons of each powerplant.
Two of the three C-135A ‘Falsies' converted from KC-135As share Boeing's ramp with a pair of tankers in 1960.
The first C-135A was rolled out on May 1, 1961, from Boeing's Transport Division plant at Renton, Washington
Although the C-135As were frequently used as troop transports, cabin windows were not installed, as part of a move to keep costs down. The forward cargo door was also standard on the KC-135A.
The C-135B introduced the TF33 powerplant to the C-135 family, greatly improving performance in comparison to J57-powered versions.
The most obvious difference between the KC-135A and C-135A was the later aircraft's lack of flying boom, replaced by a fuel dump pipe
Several KC-135As were equipped as command posts and staff transport, including 61-0316, which was used until 1975 by the Commander-in-Chief of Strike Command
The backbone of MATS airlift in the early years was the Douglas C-124 Globemaster II, which could carry 95% of the US Army's Field Force equipment. The picture shows loading trials with a Hiller UH-12 (or H-23 Raven).
The Douglas C-133 Cargomaster bore the brunt of long-range transport in Vietnam: an example is shown at Ton Son Nhut in November 1969.
Lockheed's C-141 Starlifter set the layout for jet transports - high wing, four-engined, rear ramp configuration that is still employed by the C-17 today.
The backbone of MATS airlift in the early years was the Douglas C-124 Globemaster II, which could carry 95% of the US Army's Field Force equipment. The picture shows loading trials with a Hiller UH-12 (or H-23 Raven).