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Flight 1926-09
Flight
CAPE FLIERS AT NAPLES: This photograph shows the four Napier-engined Fairey III.D seaplanes re-fuelling with "Shell" at Naples on their flight from Cairo to Lee-on-Solent recently, this being the concluding stage of the Cairo-Cape-Cairo-England flight.
Cornering in the Lympne Open Handicap. Below the Sopwith "Swallow" piloted by Mr. Watts, and above Dr. Whitehead Reid in an S.E.5.
FOKKERS FOR SWITZERLAND: A formation of Fokker F.III (Siddeley "Puma") commercial monoplanes, originally employed by K.L.M. on their air lines, being flown from Holland to Switzerland, where they have been put into service by the Basle Air Traffic Co., "Balair"
"VENI, VIDI, VICI": On its first appearance in public the new Avro "Alpha" engine in the Avro "Gosport" won the Open Handicap, piloted by Flying Officer Waghorn. The lower photograph gives a good idea of the clean lines of the nose with this engine, while the inset shows the machine in flight.
The new Avro "Alpha" engine.
AN AVRO GROUP AT THE LANCASHIRE AIR PAGEANT: Left to right - Mr. Bert Hinkler, Mr. A. W. Hubble, Mr. R. J . Parrott, FIying Officer H. R. D. Waghorn (winner of the open handicap), Mr. R. H. Dobson, and Mr. John Lord.
At the Lancashire Air Pageant: Flying Officer Waghorn winning the Open Handicap on the Avro "Alpha-Gosport."
THE LYMPNE OPEN HANDICAP: 5. The white de Havilland "Moth."
THE LANCASHIRE AIR PAGEANT: Line-up of six "Moths" for the start of the Inter-Club Members' Race. This was won by Mr. Lacayo, on the Lancashire Aero Club's G-EBLV.
READY FOR BRIGHTON: Some of the machines lined up ready for the start on the first circuit on Sunday morning. On the right, the Bristol "Brownie," which was the first machine away. The other machines are the Parnall "Pixie," the Avro "Avis," and the de Havilland "Moth."
SOME PERSONAL TOUCHES: Friendly Rivalry: Captain Geoffrey de Havilland takes Mr. Roy Chadwick, Avro designer, for a flight in his "Moth"
THE AVRO "AVENGER": These four views of the machine show the remarkably clean lines. The rudder, wholly above the tail, somehow gives a German appearance. In the inset Mr. Bert Hinkler "gives scale" to the nose. It should be remembered, however, that Hinkler is one of our smallest pilots in the matter of stature, though certainly not in nerve.
SPEED! Mr. Bert Hinkler gives a demonstration of the performance of the Avro "Avenger" with Napier engine. Figures cannot be given, but the machine is certainly extremely fast.
MANOEUVRABILITY: These views of the Avro "Avenger" in flight, piloted by Bert Hinkler, indicate that controllability is not lacking. The engine is a Napier.
THE PARNALL "PIXIE III," BRISTOL "CHERUB" ENGINE: Three-quarter rear view. This machine can be converted into a biplane.
THE FIRST OF THE ELIMINATING TESTS AT LYMPNE: Some of the competing machines photographed during the folding, housing and re-erecting test. 4, the Parnall "Pixie III"
READY FOR BRIGHTON: Some of the machines lined up ready for the start on the first circuit on Sunday morning. On the right, the Bristol "Brownie," which was the first machine away. The other machines are the Parnall "Pixie," the Avro "Avis," and the de Havilland "Moth."
LINE UP FOR THE S.M.M.T. RACE: From left to right the machines are: de Havilland "Moth," Avro "Avian," Farnborough "Cygnet," Parnall "Pixie," and Bristol "Brownie." This race was won by Hinkler on the Avro "Avian," at an average speed of 90 m.p.h.
THE RACE FOR THE GROSVENOR CHALLENGE CUP: No less than 21 machines faced the starter for this race, a record number. The result was that machines frequently got bunched together at the turning points. Our photograph show one of some such incidents. In 3 may be recognised the Short "Satellite," the Parnall "Pixie" and the R.A.E. "Hurricane."
ELIMINATING TRIALS AT LYMPNE: 3, Courtney on the Parnall "Pixie III," is well above the flags.
THE PARNALL TEAM: Left to right, J. Smith, J. W. Copley, H. Bolas (designer), F. Courtney (pilot), T. Healey, W. Lane, and D. Twose.
THE TWO WHALES: A pilot of a Spanish Dornier "Wal" (Whale) flying-boat spotted a real whale during a recent flight, and, descending, pilot and crew claimed their prize. Our pictures show the "artificial" whale in the airland the real thing after capture.
NAPIERS FOR DUTCH EAST INDIES: The machine shown above is a Fokker, type C.V., one of a batch built by the Fokker works for the Dutch East Indian Military Air Force. It is a two-seater reconnaissance biplane with Napier "Lion" engine, and is credited with a top speed of 147 m.p.h., a ceiling of 21,300 ft., and a useful load of 2,112 lb. The famous Dutch designer shows a decided preference for British aero engines.
A CZECHO-SLOVAKIAN AIR TOUR OF EUROPE: Capt. Stanovsky, the Czechoslovakian pilot, standing beside his "Aero" biplane (240 h.p., "Perun" engine) on his arrival at Croydon recently, during his aerial tour of Europe. His engineer is seen filling up with "Mobiloil."
THE ALBATROS L.73: This new German passenger-carrier, here shown in side view, is fitted with two B.M.W. type IV engines of 230 h.p. each. The cabin has seating accommodation for 8 passengers.
THE ALBATROS L.73: Three-quarter rear view. It will be noted that there is no fixed vertical fin, but that the rudder has a large horn balance.
The Albatros L.73: Three-quarter front view of the fuselage, showing centre-sections, wing-engine mountings, &c. The bracing of the top centre-section is unusual, having no struts to the front spar.
THE ALBATROS L.73: This view in the cabin, looking aft, shows the 8 seats. The back rests of the seats can be tilted to various angles, and for night flying every two seats make one sleeping berth, the seats being tipped up by means of handles and catches.
2,000 H.P.: These three photographs show the Blackburn "Iris" three-engined flying boat with Rolls-Royce "Condor III" engines.
PRAGUE - PARIS - PRAGUE IN A LIGHT 'PLANE: Lieut. Jira, the well-known Czecho-Slovakian pilot, and the Avia B.H.9 (60 h.p. Walter engine), on which he flew from Prague to Paris and back non-stop on August 31 - a distance of 1,180 miles in 13 hrs. 43 mins.
No. 9. THE AVRO "AVIAN": Three-quarter front view.
THE TWO AVRO'S IN THE TESTS: 4, the "Avian" makes light of the take-off test, in spite of a useful load of 828 lbs.
Winning the S.M.M.T. Race: Hinkler on the Avro "Avian" with Armstrong-Siddeley "Genet" engine won this race at an average speed of 90 m.p.h.
THE LANCASHIRE AIR PAGEANT: The Avro "Avian" and the de Havilland "Moth," both with "Genet" engines, starting neck-and-neck in the Open Handicap.
"BANKING ACCOUNTS" AT LYMPNE: 1 shows the Avro "Avian" in the Grosvenor Handicap.
LINE UP FOR THE S.M.M.T. RACE: From left to right the machines are: de Havilland "Moth," Avro "Avian," Farnborough "Cygnet," Parnall "Pixie," and Bristol "Brownie." This race was won by Hinkler on the Avro "Avian," at an average speed of 90 m.p.h.
SOME PERSONAL TOUCHES: The daily toilette: Hinkler having the petrol tank of his Avro "Avis" put on board again after one of its many visits to Hythe.
MAKING BOTH ENDS MEET: The Tail and the Engine Mounting of No. 9, the Avro "Avian." The engine is an Armstrong-Siddeley "Genet."
No. 1. THE BLACKBURN "BLUEBIRD": Side View.
ELIMINATED: The Blackburn "Bluebird" damaged slightly its undercarriage and permission to effect repairs was refused.
"BLACKBIRDERS" AT THE LANCASHIRE AIR PAGEANT: Mr. B. Flinton, Squadron-Leader Longton, D.F.C., A.F.C., Mr. A. C. Thornton, designer, under Major Bumpus, of the Blackburn "Bluebird," and Mr. Norman Blackburn.
"OVER THE STICKS": This photograph gives a good idea of the manner in which the take-off tests were observed. On the ladder is Major Buchanan, of the Air Ministry, while among those in the foreground may (or may not) be recognised Major Mayo, Lieut.-Col. Sir Francis McClean, and Mr. C. C. Walker. The machine "going over the top" is the Blackburn "Bluebird," piloted by Squadron-Leader Longton.
Winning the Grosvenor Cup Race: Longton, on the Blackburn "Bluebird" with Armstrong-Siddeley "Genet" engine crossing the finishing line. His average speed was 84-95 m.p.h.
THE RACE FOR THE GROSVENOR CHALLENGE CUP: No less than 21 machines faced the starter for this race, a record number. The result was that machines frequently got bunched together at the turning points. Our photograph show one of some such incidents. 2, shows the wing tips of the Cranwell, the Hawker "Cygnet," the Blackburn "Bluebird," and one of the D.H. "Moths" heading for the Postling turning point.
FORMATION FLYING EXTRAORDINARY: Daily visitors to Lympne during the light 'plane competition were "Grebes," "Woodcocks" and "Gamecocks," whose evolutions were generally admired. Our photographs show these machines in various formations.
400 c.c. ONLY: The English Electric Co.'s "Wren," which in 1923 tied with the A.N.E.C. for first prize. Mileage 87-5 miles per gallon.
FORMATION FLYING EXTRAORDINARY: Daily visitors to Lympne during the light 'plane competition were "Grebes," "Woodcocks" and "Gamecocks," whose evolutions were generally admired. Our photographs show these machines in various formations.
NEWCASTLE AERO CLUB'S FIRST FLYING MEETING: Some "snaps" taken at Cramlington. Fairey "Flycatchers" from 406 Squadron (Fleet Fighter) visited the meeting and gave fine displays
NEWCASTLE AERO CLUB'S FIRST FLYING MEETING: Some "snaps" taken at Cramlington. Fairey "Flycatchers" from 406 Squadron (Fleet Fighter) visited the meeting and gave fine displays
When Old Mother Swan wasn't looking. No. 6, the Hawker "Cygnet" doing a bit of "stunting."
THE START OF THE COMPETITION: Some of the competing machines on Sunday morning at the start for Brighton. 4, Bulman on the Hawker "Cygnet" is first man home in the first circuit. The best fuel consumption on this circuit was scored by Bulman.
THE START OF THE COMPETITION: Some of the competing machines on Sunday morning at the start for Brighton. 3, Chick on the Farnborough Hawker "Cygnet" gets away well.
THE LYMPNE OPEN HANDICAP: 3. The Hawker "Cygnet" trying to beat its handicap
THE WINNING SMILE: Flight-Lieut. Bulman crossing the finishing line at Lympne as winner of first prize in the "Daily Mail" light 'plane competition.
THE RACE FOR THE GROSVENOR CHALLENGE CUP: No less than 21 machines faced the starter for this race, a record number. The result was that machines frequently got bunched together at the turning points. Our photograph show one of some such incidents. In 1 are seen the D.H. 53, the Farnborough "Cygnet," and the Cranwell biplane approaching the aerodrome turning point.
THE RACE FOR THE GROSVENOR CHALLENGE CUP: No less than 21 machines faced the starter for this race, a record number. The result was that machines frequently got bunched together at the turning points. Our photograph show one of some such incidents. 2, shows the wing tips of the Cranwell, the Hawker "Cygnet," the Blackburn "Bluebird," and one of the D.H. "Moths" heading for the Postling turning point.
THE LYMPNE OPEN HANDICAP: 1. No. 4, the Farnborough "Cygnet," winning this event.
ELIMINATING TRIALS AT LYMPNE: 4, a "close-up" of Bulman landing the Hawker "Cygnet."
The shortest pull-up in 1924 was scored by Longton on the Hawker "Cygnet," with Anzani engine.
The Light 'Plane Competition, Lympne: Longton on No. 14, the Hawker biplane, "Cygnet," landing after the first circuit in the eliminating trials.
THE WINNING SMILE: The Hawker "Cygnet" is seen coming to rest, while admirers run out to congratulate "George" on his success.
"Weighed but not found wanting": The Hawker "Cygnet" on the scales. On the right Mr. Fordham, of the Hawker Company.
THE WINNING SMILE: A group of "Hawkers" in front of the winning "Cygnet." Left to right : Mr. F. Sigrist, Mr. Hayward, Lieut. Bulman, Mr. Peaty, Mrs. Bulman and Mr. Jones.
THE FARNBOROUGH TEAM (Second in Competition): Left to right, E. Brame, S. O. Smith, Manning Harris, F.O. Ragg, Flight-Lieut. Chick, G. N. G. Peters, W. Baker, and the "Flying Marshal," Mr. Preston.
AT THE SALES: Competitors waiting at the petrol "shop" to be served. On the right, in front of the Farnborough Hawker "Cygnet" may be seen Air Vice-Marshal Sir Sefton Brancker with Capt. Goodman Crouch.
LINE UP FOR THE S.M.M.T. RACE: From left to right the machines are: de Havilland "Moth," Avro "Avian," Farnborough "Cygnet," Parnall "Pixie," and Bristol "Brownie." This race was won by Hinkler on the Avro "Avian," at an average speed of 90 m.p.h.
THE FIRST OF THE ELIMINATING TESTS AT LYMPNE: Some of the competing machines photographed during the folding, housing and re-erecting test. 2, the Farnborough Hawker "Cygnet."
A very fine little Machine: The de Havilland 53 belonging to the Seven Aeroplane Club flies like a small Scout in spite of the fact that its engine is an A.B.C. of some 35 h.p. only.
THE RACE FOR THE GROSVENOR CHALLENGE CUP: No less than 21 machines faced the starter for this race, a record number. The result was that machines frequently got bunched together at the turning points. Our photograph show one of some such incidents. In 1 are seen the D.H. 53, the Farnborough "Cygnet," and the Cranwell biplane approaching the aerodrome turning point.
READY FOR BRIGHTON: Some of the machines lined up ready for the start on the first circuit on Sunday morning. On the right, the Bristol "Brownie," which was the first machine away. The other machines are the Parnall "Pixie," the Avro "Avis," and the de Havilland "Moth."
LINE UP FOR THE S.M.M.T. RACE: From left to right the machines are: de Havilland "Moth," Avro "Avian," Farnborough "Cygnet," Parnall "Pixie," and Bristol "Brownie." This race was won by Hinkler on the Avro "Avian," at an average speed of 90 m.p.h.
No. 3. The "Bristol Brownie," with Bristol "Cherub" Engine: Side view. Note the addition of a deck fairing on top of fuselage.
THE START OF THE COMPETITION: Some of the competing machines on Sunday morning at the start for Brighton. 1, Uwins on the Bristol "Brownie" was the first man away.
THE LYMPNE OPEN HANDICAP: 2. The single-seater Bristol "Brownie" in a sharp turn.
THE FIRST OF THE ELIMINATING TESTS AT LYMPNE: Some of the competing machines photographed during the folding, housing and re-erecting test. 5, the Bristol "Brownie."
THE BRISTOL TEAM: From left to right, standing, P. Mayer, R. Fedden, F. Uwins, and A. Suddes. Seated, W. Allen, F. Chard, and F. Godfrey.
A Seaplane on Wheels: The Short "Mussel" has been fitted with a land undercarriage and took part in Saturday's racing.
"BANKING ACCOUNTS" AT LYMPNE: 2. Mr. Lankester Parker stands the Short "Mussel" on its wing tip in the Grosvenor Handicap.
Halton H.A.C.1 Bristol "Cherub" Engine
THE LYMPNE OPEN HANDICAP: 4, The Sopwith "Swallow" wanting to know "Watts what."
Cornering in the Lympne Open Handicap. Below the Sopwith "Swallow" piloted by Mr. Watts, and above Dr. Whitehead Reid in an S.E.5.
ALL-METAL CONSTRUCTION AT WEYBRIDGE: Three views of one of the batch of Vickers-"Wibault" single-seater fighters which Vickers, Limited, are building at their Weybridge works. These machines are built almost entirely of Vickers Duralumin, even the covering being of this material. The engines fitted are Bristol "Jupiters."
QUANTITY PRODUCTION OF ALL-METAL AEROPLANES: A batch of Wibault scouts in course of construction at'the Weybridge works of Vickers, Ltd. The Wibault is of French design, Vickers holding the British rights. The engines fitted are Bristol "Jupiters."
An Aerial Show-Room for Motor Cars: Our picture shows an interior view of the cabin of the American Remington Burnelli "RB2" air liner fitted up as a motor-car showroom, complete with an Essex motor-car, and office equipment. So fitted, it carried out an aerial tour, with eight passengers, in the States. The fuselage of the "RB2," it may be mentioned, is exceptionally wide and deep, forming, in side elevation, the contour of an aerofoil.
A 1923 WINNER: The A.N.E.C. with Blackburne Engine which tied with the "Wren" for first prize. 87-5 miles per gallon. James wheeling his machine out before a flight, and, inset, a typically banked turn.
1,000 MILES AROUND LYMPNE: Mr. Bert Hinkler in his Avro monoplane, 700 c.c. Blackburne engine, at the completion of his 80 laps of the course. Inset, the machine crossing the finishing line at the end of the 80th lap. During the whole week Hinkler did not have a single forced landing.
THE RACE FOR THE GROSVENOR CHALLENGE CUP: No less than 21 machines faced the starter for this race, a record number. The result was that machines frequently got bunched together at the turning points. Our photograph show one of some such incidents. In 3 may be recognised the Short "Satellite," the Parnall "Pixie" and the R.A.E. "Hurricane."
No.15. THE SHORT "SATELLITE": This machine has been entered by the Seven Aeroplane Club.
THE RACE FOR THE GROSVENOR CHALLENGE CUP: No less than 21 machines faced the starter for this race, a record number. The result was that machines frequently got bunched together at the turning points. Our photograph show one of some such incidents. In 3 may be recognised the Short "Satellite," the Parnall "Pixie" and the R.A.E. "Hurricane."
No. 7. THE SUPERMARINE "SPARROW II": Three-quarter front view. Note the square wing tips.
THE FIRST OF THE ELIMINATING TESTS AT LYMPNE: Some of the competing machines photographed during the folding, housing and re-erecting test. 3, the Supermarine "Sparrow II" which has its wings in one piece and must be transported as shown.
Supermarine "Sparrow II" Bristol "Cherub" Engine
No.16. THE WESTLAND "WOODPIGEON": This machine has been entered by the Seven Aeroplane Club.
ELIMINATING TRIALS AT LYMPNE: 2, the Westland "Woodpigeon" during a take-off attempt.
THE 1924 WINNER: The Beardmore "Wee Bee," with Bristol "Cherub," which, piloted by Maurice Piercey, gained first prize.
GREATEST MILEAGE IN 1924: 762-5 miles were flown by the Cranwell C.L.A.2, piloted by Lieut. N. Comper, its designer. The engine fitted was a Bristol "Cherub."
No. 10. THE AVRO "AVIS": Three-quarter front view.
THE TWO AVRO'S IN THE TESTS: 2, Douglas away on the "Avis" on Sunday morning. This machine has since been eliminated by a damaged undercarriage.
READY FOR BRIGHTON: Some of the machines lined up ready for the start on the first circuit on Sunday morning. On the right, the Bristol "Brownie," which was the first machine away. The other machines are the Parnall "Pixie," the Avro "Avis," and the de Havilland "Moth."
THE FIRST OF THE ELIMINATING TESTS AT LYMPNE: Some of the competing machines photographed during the folding, housing and re-erecting test. 1, the Avro "Avis."
THE LANCASHIRE AIR PAGEANT: Captain Courtney on the A.D.C. Nimbus-Martinsyde starts scratch in the Open Handicap.
No. 12. THE CRANWELL C.L.A.4: Three-quarter rear view.
No. 12. THE CRANWELL C.L.A.4: Front view. Note the short top plane
One of the "Eliminated": The Cranwell C.L.A.4 biplane damaged an undercarriage and was refused permission to repair. It is therefore out of the competition.
"BANKING ACCOUNTS" AT LYMPNE: 5. Lieut. Walmesley rounding the aerodrome turning point on the Cranwell biplane.
THE RACE FOR THE GROSVENOR CHALLENGE CUP: No less than 21 machines faced the starter for this race, a record number. The result was that machines frequently got bunched together at the turning points. Our photograph show one of some such incidents. In 1 are seen the D.H. 53, the Farnborough "Cygnet," and the Cranwell biplane approaching the aerodrome turning point.
THE RACE FOR THE GROSVENOR CHALLENGE CUP: No less than 21 machines faced the starter for this race, a record number. The result was that machines frequently got bunched together at the turning points. Our photograph show one of some such incidents. 2, shows the wing tips of the Cranwell, the Hawker "Cygnet," the Blackburn "Bluebird," and one of the D.H. "Moths" heading for the Postling turning point.
Flight-Lieut. Comper winning the Stewards' Handicap on the Cranwell C.L.A.4 (Bristol "Cherub"). Average speed 70-85 m.p.h.
THE CRANWELL TEAM: Left to right, Flight-Sergt. Hammond, Flight-Sergt. McKeown, F.O. Cashmore, Flight-Lieut. Pack, Flight-Lieut. Comper (designer and pilot), Flight-Lieut. Walmesley, (pilot), Flight-Lieut. George, and F. O. Herbert.
THE CRANWELL C.L.A. IV: Some constructional details: 1, The lower plane wing roots built into the fuselage. The bottom longeron is shown broken away behind the rear spar so as to show better the metal fitting, and between the spars this longeron passes just inside the inner rib. The rear undercarriage strut is attached to the front spar attachment. The hinges for folding the wings are also shown. In 2 is illustrated the inner end of the starboard lower plane, with hinge fittings, etc. The solid rib is partly broken away to show the form of the drag bracing clip. 3 illustrates the special rib and sheet steel fittings for the inter-plane I-strut on the lower plane. This strut slopes inwards, the sketch being viewed from outside the strut attachment. The spar is broken away to show the details of the special metal fitting for the attachment of the strut. The form of construction employed in the rear portion of the fuselage is illustrated in 4, while 5 shows details of this construction, the actual joint shown being on the lower longeron and viewed from inside.
Cranwell C.L.A.4 Bristol "Cherub" Engine
No. 13. A.N.E.C. IV "Missel Thrush": Three-quarter front view.
"BANKING ACCOUNTS" AT LYMPNE: 4. Col. Henderson on No. 13, the A.N.E.C. "Missel-Thrush," in the Grosvenor Race.
THE A.N.E.C. IV "MISSEL THRUSH." SOME CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS :- (1) Shows the simple wing construction at the interplane strut-compression member section ; the leading edge is an aluminium tube, while the spar is of the box type, spruce and plywood. (2) Is the centre of the tail plane, which "sits" on the flat upper surface of the fuselage, and is held down by four long bolts passing from the latter through the fittings on the tail spars. Note, on the rear spar, the neat roller for the control cables. (3) The chassis struts, comprising steel tubes, forming a curved Vee, and connected at the ends by a streamline "trough" carrying the axle, are faired as shown by plywood.
A.N.E.C. IV "Missel Thrush" 35 hp. Blackburne "Thrush" Engine
A BRISTOL WIN IN AMERICA: The Heath "Tomboy" light monoplane, fitted with a Bristol "Cherub" engine, which won the "Dayton Daily News" Trophy, one of the Light 'Plane events in the National Air Races at Philadelphia on September 7.
THE SIKORSKY S.35 3-ENGINED BIPLANE: Preparing for the Atlantic flight; a general view of Capt. Fonck's machine at Roosevelt Field, New York.
THE SIKORSKY S.35 3-ENGINED BIPLANE: The three engines fitted to this machine are 400-h.p. Gnome-Rhone "Jupiter" air-cooled radials, built in France under licence from the Bristol Co.
The partially finished fuselage of the Sikorsky S.35 3-engined biplane. In this duralumin tubes of square section are mainly employed.
Sikorsky S.35 3 Jupiter Engines
No. 2. THE DE HAVILLAND "MOTH": Side view.
No. 2. THE DE HAVILLAND "MOTH": Three-quarter front view.
Making Quite Sure: Professor Low sealing the tank of the de Havilland "Moth."
THE DE HAVILLAND TEAM: From left to right, H. Cantrill, R. Brant, E. Mitchell, Capt. de Havilland, W. Hales (Armstrong-Siddeley), and Capt. H. Broad.
THE LANCASHIRE AIR PAGEANT: The Avro "Avian" and the de Havilland "Moth," both with "Genet" engines, starting neck-and-neck in the Open Handicap.
Capt. Broad cornering on the de Havilland "Moth" with "Genet" engine in the S.M.M.T. Race. Average speed 94-75 m.p.h.
ELIMINATING TRIALS: In the lower photograph the de Havilland "Moth" is seen doing its get-off test, while on the right the same machine is seen in the landing test. Note the mechanic standing up to act as "air brake."
THE RACE FOR THE GROSVENOR CHALLENGE CUP: No less than 21 machines faced the starter for this race, a record number. The result was that machines frequently got bunched together at the turning points. Our photograph show one of some such incidents. 2, shows the wing tips of the Cranwell, the Hawker "Cygnet," the Blackburn "Bluebird," and one of the D.H. "Moths" heading for the Postling turning point.
LINE UP FOR THE S.M.M.T. RACE: From left to right the machines are: de Havilland "Moth," Avro "Avian," Farnborough "Cygnet," Parnall "Pixie," and Bristol "Brownie." This race was won by Hinkler on the Avro "Avian," at an average speed of 90 m.p.h.