Flight 1930-08
Flight
The three types of machines with which this Squadron is equipped, namely, on the left: the D.H.9, of which there are four; centre the Westland "Wapiti," which number eight, and finally - sundry Avro "Lynx" biplanes.
A Formation of "Bristol Fighters" of the O.U.A.S. Note the dark blue bands.
THE Do. X. is now afloat again and has 12 Curtiss Conqueror type G.V. 15 per cent. 600 H.P. water-cooled engines installed. These are geared and mounted, as were the Jupiter engines, in six tandem nacelles.
One of the R.A.F. fighter flights half-way up a loop in formation.
Blue Siskins intercept a raid on Andover by Fairey III F.'s, but the bomb signal (the puff of smoke on the right of the picture) has been dropped.
No. 29 Fighter Squadron at Cranwell, waiting for raiders
The arrival at Croydon.
AN ECHO OF A GREAT FLIGHT: A snap of Miss Amy Johnson taken at Sourabaya while her D.H. "Moth" was having its tanks replenished with "Shell" motor spirit.
Refuelling a Sidestrand.
A Flight of No. 23 Fighter Squadron catches the Sidestrands of No. 101 B.S. at Andover.
The unusual tail units of the Boulton & Paul Phoenix.
Refuelling the Foxes of No. 12 B.S.
No. 12 Bomber Squadron (Foxes) coming home to Andover from a raid.
Five of the "Wapitis" of No. 601 (County of London) Bomber Squadron, A. A.F., led by Flight-Lieut. Whitehead Reid, M.B., flying along the coast near Folkestone. In the middle distance will be seen Shorncliffe Camp.
Another view of the "Wapitis" of 601 Squadron flying above the clouds.
A unique "aerial" of five "Wapitis" flying in formation above the clouds.
The three types of machines with which this Squadron is equipped, namely, on the left: the D.H.9, of which there are four; centre the Westland "Wapiti," which number eight, and finally - sundry Avro "Lynx" biplanes.
THE COFFEE MILL: Starting the Argus engine of a Klemm.
VARIOUS STYLES OF WING FOLDING: These photographs from the International Touring Competition indicate how aircraft designers of various nationalities provide for reducing space required for garaging machines. 1. a Klemm has its wings dismantled and stacked on the side.
Poss, on a Klemm-Argus, clearing the obstacle.
An unconventional view of a Puss-Moth. There is little doubt as to how it got its name if it is seen like this.
A DE HAVILLAND "PUSS MOTH" FOR THE PRINCE OF WALES: This machine, recently finished, is painted in the Guards' colours - red and blue - and may be recognised from the identification letters G-ABBS.
CAPTAIN BARNARD'S RETURN. Note that the time is 14 minutes past six.
THE END OF THE 2,800 MILES' FLIGHT: Barnard taxies his Puss Moth up to the Customs at Croydon.
Home again: Captain Barnard and his wife after the completion of a very fine flight indeed.
Capt. C. D. Barnard and the D.H. "Puss Moth" on which he is attempting a flight from England to Malta in 14 hours.
THROUGH the kindness of Col. The Master of Sempill we are able to publish some photographs showing the "Puss Moth" on floats. On the left, at the top, she is seen at Hugh Town, St. Mary's, Scilly Is., while on the right, "Ann" and "Jane" are ensuring a clean "understanding"! Below, a unique view shows the "Puss Moth" at Falmouth, in front of the "Cutty Sark."
Our photograph here shows the special interior fittings which have been incorporated in the Prince of Wales' new Puss Moth (Gipsy II). The cabin has a special finish and the rear seat has extra size and upholstery. This special seat can be removed and the normal one fitted when it is desired to use the third seat as well. Besides the seating arrangement the machine has an extra rear ventilator, dual control and a large luggage grid behind the rear seat.
An Albatros L.101 landing over the tape.
VARIOUS STYLES OF WING FOLDING: These photographs from the International Touring Competition indicate how aircraft designers of various nationalities provide for reducing space required for garaging machines. 5, is one of the Arado monoplanes, which uses a system intermediate between folding and stacking.
Mr. Thorn (Avian Hermes) well over in the take-off test.
A. SPORTS MODEL: The new Avian ("Hermes") provides for the private owner who wants something with a rather better performance than the ordinary light aeroplane offers. In the centre the well-shaped fairing and folding windscreens, can be seen, while the folding flap in the centre-section allows easy access to the rear cockpit.
MISS JOHNSON AT SYDNEY: An "impression" of Miss Amy Johnson flying over the Sydney Harbour Bridge (under construction) in the National Airways Avro 10, on June 4
Note the excellent view from the pilot's cockpit.
A Bluebird (Gipsy I) which Capt. Roxborough Smith is flying for the Rhodesian Aviation Company. Flights over the Victoria Falls are very popular in this machine, especially for those on their first flight, as the side-by-side seating makes conversation easy.
A BLUEBIRD.PROJECT: Mrs Victor Bruce has just taken delivery of a Blackburn Bluebird (Gipsy II) and is spending most of ber time in the air at Brooklands, where she took her "A" licence.
The Blackburn "Sydney." The largest military monoplane flying-boat. She has three Rolls-Royce F. XII M.S. engines, and has been designed for reconnaissance and coastal patrol work, carrying a normal crew of five - pilot, pilot-navigator, wireless operator, engineer and gunner.
A Flight of No. 23 Fighter Squadron catches the Sidestrands of No. 101 B.S. at Andover.
26 марта 1927г.: прототип Handley Page Hinaidi Mk I совершил первый полет. Самолет на основе ранее выпущенного Hyderabad поступил на вооружение 99-й эскадрильи, базировавшейся в Аппер Хейфорде, Оксфордшир.
The night bombers of No. 99 Bomber Squadron at Waddington.
Blue Siskins intercept a raid on Andover by Fairey III F.'s, but the bomb signal (the puff of smoke on the right of the picture) has been dropped.
The Fairchild KR.21 (Genet Major) with a Townend Ring. A Canadian built private owner's machine.
Francis Lombardi (left) and his mechanic, Capannini, and the Fiat A.S.1 monoplane (95 h.p Fiat A.50) in which they flew from Vercelli to Tokio.
A BELIEVER IN CONTROL SURFACES: This Polish PWS 8 biplane, with Walter "Vega" engine, is very reminiscent of the Handley Page "Gugnunc." The lift bracing is in the form of a single strut in the plane of the rear spars.
PWS-8. First flown in the autumn of 1929 the PWS-8 was a two/three-seat sports and touring biplane, powered by an 85-h.p, Czech Waiter Vega five-cylinder air-cooled radial, permitting a cruising speed of 80 m.p.h. for a range of 435 miles. The PWS-8 was not built in large numbers, but one, SP-ADA (illustrated), took part in the 1930 European Challenge Cup and Competition, "Rundflug". The seating consisted of pilot and one passenger in the rear open cockpit, and the second passenger in the front cockpit. Behind the rear cockpit was a capacious luggage compartment. The colour scheme of SP-ADA was all-silver with red trim on wings and fuselage and black lettering and PWS trade mark on the fin. Span 32 ft. 9 1/2in. (upper), 29ft, 6 in. (lower); length 24ft. 8 in.; height 9 ft. 8in.
Mr. Andrews (Spartan-Arrow-Gipsy II) makes sure of clearing the take-off obstacle,
Herr Johann Risztics (Junkers-Genet) watches his fuel being measured out after the consumption test.
VARIOUS STYLES OF WING FOLDING: These photographs from the International Touring Competition indicate how aircraft designers of various nationalities provide for reducing space required for garaging machines. 3. another Junkers uses stacking of the wings.
VARIOUS STYLES OF WING FOLDING: These photographs from the International Touring Competition indicate how aircraft designers of various nationalities provide for reducing space required for garaging machines. 2, a Junkers "Junior" with a front spar universal joint.
A Junkers Junior, showing the new method of folding
the wings.
"GENETS" IN LOW-WING MONOPLANES: A Junkers "Junior"
A NEW FLYING BOAT FOR THE R.A.F.: The Supermarine-Jaguar "Southampton" Mark X has been built to the order of the Air Ministry at the Supermarine Works of Vickers (Aviation) Ltd. Note that the machine is about to take off on two engines only.
"ON HER STEP": The Supermarine-Jaguar "Southampton" Mark X getting away. Note the clean running.
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THE VERVILLE TRAINER: A recent American machine produced by the Verville Aircraft Co. of Detroit.
The three types of machines with which this Squadron is equipped, namely, on the left: the D.H.9, of which there are four; centre the Westland "Wapiti," which number eight, and finally - sundry Avro "Lynx" biplanes.
Mr. Carberry (Mono Special-Warner) underestimates the run required during a practice take-off.
Mr. Carberry (Mono-Special-Warner) in the take-off test.
VARIOUS STYLES OF WING FOLDING: These photographs from the International Touring Competition indicate how aircraft designers of various nationalities provide for reducing space required for garaging machines. 4, shows the simple British way of folding, the machine being Broad's "Moth."
Miss Spooner superintending the manhandling of her machine during the consumption trials.
ENGINE-STARTING: Swinging the propeller of the Archduke Hapsburg-Bourbon's Gipsy-Moth.
"OVER THE TAPE": Miss Spooner, in her Gipsy-Moth, clears the obstacle in the Technical Tests.
A Singapore Club aircraft in its native element.
The European Staff of the Singapore Club with their "full" bodied native assistants.
The pleasant foreshore of the Singapore Club.
The Club aircraft in their hangar.
VARIOUS STYLES OF WING FOLDING: These photographs from the International Touring Competition indicate how aircraft designers of various nationalities provide for reducing space required for garaging machines. 6, illustrates the Caudron way, tying the wings on with rope.
M. Finat (Caudron-Renault) in the take-off test
Ivinghoe Beacon, with Capt. Needham gliding in a "Professor."
F./O. Buxton making the best glide of the match.
A Prufling of the London Gliding Club in the air over Ivinghoe Beacon.
Hauling a "Prufling" up Ivinghoe Beacon. Behind are the trees in which Michelson "landed."
The Master of Sempill in a "Prufling."
The machine park at Mousehold with the Avro Monoplane in the foreground.
"GENETS" IN LOW-WING MONOPLANES: A PWS 51 (Polish) Machine.
The Poppenhausen. A two-seater glider at Ivinghoe Beacon.
THE POPPENHAUSEN: A two-seater glider now in operation by the London Gliding club.
The cockpits of the Poppenhausen, taken at a recent meeting of the London Gliding Club.
Capt. Needham and Mr. Hembrow in the "Poppenhausen."
The Alert assembled.
The Alert in its travelling crate
The new Burnelli "UB-20" air transport in flight. It has an aerofoil-section fuselage accommodating 20 passengers, and is equipped with two 800-h.p. Packard engines, and Goodyear "air wheels."
Первоначально Hendy 302 оснащался двигателем Cirrus Hermes I мощностью 105 л. с. (78 кВт), но затем последний заменили на Cirrus Hermes IV мощностью 130 л. с. (97 кВт), а также перепроектировали кабину и установили шасси с обтекателями колес. Модифицированная машина стала называться Hendy 302A.
DESIGNED by Mr. Basil B. Henderson, this new machine has been but recently produced, and is something of a "dark horse." Last year Mr. Henderson produced the "Hobo," incorporating a novel form of wing construction, and the "302" is a development of the smaller machine, being a cabin two-seater. As the picture shows, it is a low-wing monoplane. The occupants are placed in tandem. The engine is a Cirrus-Hermes.
HENDY MEN: On the left, Capt. E. W. Percival, and on the right, Mr. Basil B. Henderson.
THE BUSINESS END: The cowling of the "Hermes"engine in the "Hendy" 302 has been carefully designed and although totally enclosed, the engine keeps remarkably cool.
This view from below shows the neat way in which the centre-section of the wing fairs into the fuselage.
THE "HENDY" 302: Flying Views from below and above
THE "HENDY" 302: The mounting of the "Hermes" engine is very simple, and the attachment to fuselage corners is by stirrup plates.
THE "HENDY" 302 Details of the wing construction. Note the lattice type drag bracing of the main spars.
THE CABIN OF THE "HENDY" 302: This is very comfortable, with plenty of leg and elbow room. The view is good, much better than one would expect from the external appearance.
Provision is made, on the "Hendy" 302 for the support of a jack under the axle.
THE "HENDY" 302: Mr. Henderson has designed a novel form of main spar bracing, in which the spars are braced top and bottom by lattice strips, anchored at their ends and points of intersection to three-ply gussets.
Hendy 302 Cirrus "Hermes" Engine
The Fafnir in the air, flown by Herr Groenhoff just after taking off at the Wasserkuppe
The "Fafnir," an interesting new glider built by the Rhon-Rossitten Gesellschaft, in flight at the Wasserkuppe during the competitions now in progress. The bird-like wings and the extraordinarily high aspect ratio should be noted. Extreme care has been taken in fairing the fuselage, and the pilot sits in a modified form of cabin, a centre fairing going right over his head and merging into the centre of the wing.
Another photograph showing the nose of the Fafnir. It is expected that it will have a very flat gliding angle. The care with which all corners have been faired in can be seen.
The tail units of the Fafnir, which has been designed by Herr Lippisch to replace the Wien.