Flight 1933-09
Flight
The Junkers Ju.52 3m., used by Deutsche Luft Hansa.
Italian flying-boats, Savoia S.66 class, a commercial version the type used by Gen. Balbo on his Atlantic flights.
AT THE CRACK OF DAWN: Haar, or sea mist, enveloped Turnhouse Aerodrome on Saturday morning when the "Harts" of No. 33 (Bomber) Squadron took off to bomb the attacking Fleet.
"AS PANTS THE HART FOR COOLING STREAMS": The machines of No. 33 (Bomber) Squadron just in from a raid gather round the petrol tank at Turnhouse Aerodrome.
THE C.-IN-C.: Air Marshal Sir Robert Brooke-Popham, K.C.B., etc., flew round the Blue aerodromes in a two-seater "Bulldog."
The Reception Tent by daylight. In the foreground (the second machine) can be seen the Bristol Fighter of Empire Air Services.
Prince Henry of the Netherlands (extreme left) in front of the Pander "Postjager" on the occasion of the opening of the new clubhouse of the Amsterdam Aero Club. On Prince Henry's left is Mr. Pander, Jr.
A model of the new Pander Mail Carrier, now under construction.
AT LEUCHARS: The Boulton & Paul "Sidestrands" (two "Jupiters") of No. 101 (Bomber) Squadron in readiness for a raid.
ECHELON ON THE RIGHT, STEPPED UP: View of No. 1 (Fighter) Squadron in one of the most difficult of all formations.
No. 1 (FIGHTER) SQUADRON: The squadron marking is two red lines, parallel on the upper planes, but converging on the fuselage.
No. 1 (FIGHTER) SQUADRON: In the left-hand picture the squadron is in Squadron Formation; in the lower right-hand picture it is in Squadron V, and in the top right one of the flights is shown doing a "flight roll."
FLIGHTS LINE ABREAST: The clean lines of the Hawker "Furies" (Rolls-Royce "Kestrels") of No. I (Fighter) Squadron from Tangmere show up well in this effective formation.
ECHELON ON THE RIGHT, STEPPED UP: View of No. 1 (Fighter) Squadron in one of the most difficult of all formations.
"1": No.1 (Fighter) Squadron do a little figure-writing, being naturally proud of their number.
THE CO.: Sqd. Ldr. C. B. S. Spackman, D.F.C., in his Hawker "Fury."
TORPEDO ATTACK: A Blackburn "Ripon" of No. 811 (Torpedo Bomber) Squadron of the Blue Force delivering an attack on H.M.S. Malaya. H.M.S. Warspite, the Red flagship, is ahead.
DEFENDING THEIR NATIVE SHORES: The "Wapitis" of No. 603 (City of Edinburgh) (Bomber) Squadron (which had no flotation gear) 30 miles out to sea to bomb the invaders.
STARTING UP: Sqd. Ldr. Lord Clydesdale has brought the City of Glasgow (Bomber) Squadron over from Abbotsinch to Turnhouse, and they are about to take their "Wapitis" off on a raid.
THE GAY "GORDONS": No. 40 (Bomber) Squadron have just dropped bombs on the three capital ships, H.M.S. Renown, Warspite and Malaya. Destroyers are scurrying in all directions. Observe how the Main Fleet has changed direction to avoid the air attack.
Saro "Cloud" (2 "Serval") eight seater.
One of the Junkers seaplanes used by Aero OY of Finland,
The latest Dewoitine D.332.
THE FLIGHT TO MOSCOW: The new Dewoitine D.332 monoplane just before leaving Le Bourget for Moscow, with M. Pierre Cot, Air Minister, on board.
PRACTICAL RESEARCH: Sir John Carden, who has been doing a lot of useful experimental work in connection with silencers for aircraft engines, with his specially silenced Klemm, which won the prize for the "quietest engine" at the Hook Aerial Garden Party on September 6
READY FOR THE START: The five machines lined up at Portsmouth Aerodrome, before starting for the race round the Isle of Wight.
THE "GARDEN" PARTY: An A.S.T. "Cadet" flying over the club enclosure.
AWAY UP NORTH: The D.H. "Dragon," operated by Highland Airways on their Inverness - Orkney service, at Wideford Airport.
OUR AIR-MINDED PREMIER: Mr. Ramsay MacDonald alighting from a "Dragon" at Aldergrove, Ulster, after a flight from Lossiemouth on August 30 to visit the Marquis and Marchioness of Londonderry. He returned to Hendon on September 3 in a R.A.F. machine.
ENTERPRISE: Western Airways find that traffic for their service between Cardiff and Bristol is growing rapidly. They are now using this "Dragon." Mr. Norman. Edgar is on the left with Messrs. C. R. Cubitt and G. W. Monk, his pilots, next to him. Lt. Col. D. B. Gray, on the right, is a new Director of the firm.
Malakal Aerodrome (Sudan): Imperial Airways' Horsa landing on the finished runway. The machine is actually touching the southern turning circle, and the reeds seen in the background are in the backwater of the Nile, which runs beside the aerodrome.
The Wibault-Penhoet, another type used by Air-France.
One of the French commercial aircraft which were flown to Moscow to show the Russians what France can produce in this way. The Wibault-Penhoet 282T.
The first production Airspeed "Courier". The excellent view from the Courier's cabin is well shown in this flying picture, taken while the retractable undercarriage was "at the ready."
(from left to right) A. L. Naish and B. Brady, who hold the sole selling agency for England, Ireland and Wales for this machine, N. S. Norway, A. H. Tiltman, and Lord Granthorpe (Chairman), the Directors of Airspeed, Ltd.
READY TO TRY AGAIN: Mr. C. T. Uhn is ready to make another attempt to fly the Atlantic in the Avro 10 Faith in Australia, which has now been repaired by A. V. Roe, Ltd., at their Manchester works. Our picture shows the machine and its crew - reading from left to right, Messrs. Allen, Ulm, Taylor and Edwards.
Side elevation of the new Avro Commercial monoplane.
THE HULL-GRIMSBY AIR FERRY: A snap of the Blackburn "Segrave" monoplane, operated by East Yorkshire Motor Services, Ltd., and North Sea, Aerial & General Transport, Ltd., on the Hull-Grimsby air ferry, flying over Hull Docks.
MINUS ITS "MOULDY": A Blackburn "Baffin" (Bristol "Pegasus" engine) torpedo bomber undergoing tests.
Another French machine - the Breguet 19 Commercial.
THE KUALA LUMPUR FLYING CLUB: Our picture shows the recently erected Club hangar with three of the Club "Moths," together with another "Moth" and Comper "Swift," privately owned respectively by Dr. (Miss) Robertson and Mr. Birch, both members of the Club.
One of the French commercial aircraft which were flown to Moscow to show the Russians what France can produce in this way. C. de Vernheilh's Couzinet monoplane Biarritz.
The Reception Tent by daylight. In the foreground (the second machine) can be seen the Bristol Fighter of Empire Air Services.
FOR THE SPANISH GOVERNMENT TOPOGRAPHICAL SURVEY DEPARTMENT: Four de Havilland "Fox Moths" ("Gipsy Major") which have been specially equipped lor aerial survey work.
H.M.S. Furious: The Fairey "3 F" machines of No. 822 (Fleet Spotter Reconnaissance) Squadron ready to take off from the deck of the carrier. Note the smoke issuing from below the flying deck.
The new Short Transport monoplane making a test flight.
The Fokker XX, one of the latest types, with retractable undercarriage, produced for Dutch and other transport lines.
"Monospar" (2 Pobjoy) four seater.
The Clark 43, another American high-speed machine used by Swissair.
AT ZERO HOUR: At noon on Friday five "Southamptons" of Nos. 210 and 201 (F.B.) Squadrons left their moorings at Port Edgar and started off on long reconnaissance.
OFF FOR THE NORTH SEA: A Supermarine "Southampton" (two Napier "Lions") taking off under the Forth Bridge to search for the Fleet.
The Aero A.38, one of the Czech-built aircraft used by C.L.S.
A BRITISH SUCCESS IN POLAND: This R.W.D.5 machine, fitted with a "Hermes IV" and piloted by M. Pronaszko, obtained first place in the Fifth Round Poland Flight which took place on September 2-10.
The Short "Scipio" flying-boat, this class being used by Imperial Airways on over-water routes.
AIR TOUR OF HOLLAND: The start from the Waalhaven aerodrome, Rotterdam. The first machine can be seen in the air.
A Cams flying-boat used by Air-France on the Mediterranean services.
THE ANTONI VARIABLE CAMBER WING: As reported in our last issue a successful test was made at Brockworth on September 8 with a Breda fitted with this wing. Our picture shows the machine in flight.
THE KUALA LUMPUR FLYING CLUB: Our picture shows the recently erected Club hangar with three of the Club "Moths," together with another "Moth" and Comper "Swift," privately owned respectively by Dr. (Miss) Robertson and Mr. Birch, both members of the Club.
The Hon. Mrs. Victor Bruce in her "Gipsy Moth."
One of the French commercial aircraft which were flown to Moscow to show the Russians what France can produce in this way. The new Marcel Bloch 120
The Bombing of the Bucking Ford. The machine is a Miles "Satyr."
LOOKS A BIT FISHY! It is not, however, a photo of a tropical fish taken in the Zoo Aquarium, but an aerial view of the latest Stipa Caproni flying "Venturi tube" - a previous model of which was briefly described in "Flight" of October 20, 1932.
A JAPANESE GLIDER: This glider, designed by Prof. H. Sato, was constructed by the students of the Aeroplane Department of the Imperial University, Fukuoka. Pilot Shizura made a flight of 8 min. 15 sec. on this glider.
A HUNGARIAN PRODUCTION: Mr. Anthony Banhidy and the "Gerle 13" biplane he has designed.
ON "SHELL" SERVICE: The latest addition to the "Shell" fleet of aircraft, a Caudron "Phalene" monoplane ("Gipsy Major"), which will be used for the Shell organisation in France.
The cabin of the "Mouse" is light and airy, as it is fitted with a form of sunshine roof. The small locker in the wing root can be used for tools and log books. The luggage locker, as shown, holds three suit cases, which are supplied with the machine.
The front view emphasises the clean design.
This front view show the neat design of the undercarriage. The clean engine cowling around the "Gipsy Major" and the small space taken by the "Mouse" when folded should be noted.
The centre section is built as a separate unit. 1, an adjustable seat sliding on runners. 2, the starboard wing fuel tank. 3, small lockers for tools and log books. 4, a control column, working the push-push rods which leave the wing at 5, where they end in rubber buffers. 6, the elbow joint upon which the wing folds. 7, an undercarriage wheel retracted. 8 and 9, the wing root spar bolts. 10, the centre attachment point for the fuselage.
The front part of the fuselage drops over the centre section of the wing and is attached by three bolts at 10a and 10b.
This shows the method by which the wings are folded on a central joint.
Details of the retractable undercarriage.
These three sketches show how the wing folds. The jointed tube A is anchored in the centre section and passes through the tube B.
This explains the general structure of the wing.
A sketch explains the action of the push-push rods for working the ailerons, while at the same time providing a system which does not have to be uncoupled when the wings are folded.
The tail plane on the left has a boxed wooden spar with steel ribs. The rudder on the right is all steel.
A fuselage joint between the rear portion and the cabin; large plywood biscuits and steel fish plates are used.
The tail wheel mounted on a spring steel fork.
Comper "Mouse" D.H. Gipsy "Major" Engine