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Air Pictorial 1958-10
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Kastrup's cosmopolitan visitors now include the Ilyushin Il-14s of TABSO, the Bulgarian national airline, one of which, LZ-ILC is shown here.
Do old aeroplanes, like old soldiers, never die? This Vampire, service career abruptly ended, is now used to advertise a popular soft drink.
Will you fly Comets? This Comet 2 has a stage length of more than 2,200 miles against a 50 m.p.h. headwind. The cruising speed is 480 m.p.h. and the cruising altitude is 35-40,000 ft. The Comets provide the R.A.F. with that essential quality of mobility so vital in air strategy today.
LOCKHEED F-104-A STARFIGHTER. The missile with a man in it.
The Fairey Gannet A.E.W.3 will eventually replace the Douglas Skyraider now in service with the Royal Navy. The dimensions of the A.E.W.3 are: span 54 ft, 6 in., length 44 ft. 0 in., height 16 ft. 10 in.
Once relegated to the scrap heap, the Seafire 17 SX137 is now airworthy again due to some commendable intelligence in high places.
All four DC-6A aircraft have now arrived in this country. Hunting Clan's G-APNO and 'NP at London Airport and Eagle's G-APOM and 'ON at Blackbushe. G-APNO arrived 10th August and 'ON on 4th September. The latter, shown here, carried N6814C on fuselage and G-APON on the fin.
In the August issue of Air Pictorial "Aeroscribe" wrote about bomb-shaped high-speed targets called radops, and published photographs showing single radops being towed by a T-33 and Skyray. One of our readers - S. Pehz, of West Norwood, London - sent in a photograph of a Martin B-57A target plane equipped with TWO radops which we reproduce here. In his letter Mr. Peltz says: "I am told that T-33s tow targets like these for F.86D Sabres."
BEECHCRAFT SUPER 18. Private transport plane.
Will you fly fighters? Never have the fighter pilot's responsibilities been so great. Defence is a high priority and calls for special flying skill in developing air-to-air guided missile tactics.
Flying on special operations. Men of jungle patrols in Malaya depend on the helicopters of the Far East Air Force for ammunition, water, food, and often their lives.
REPUBLIC P-47 THUNDERBOLT. An outstanding fighter-bomber of World War II.
GRUMMAN S2F HUNTER KILLER. An all-weather submarine chaser.
How adventurous are you? This Otter aircraft, taking part in the Trans-Antarctic Expedition, was flown 1,460 miles non-stop over the South Pole by the R.A.F.
Will you fly V-bombers? You must be good to be selected for V-bomber duties. The responsibilities call for sound teamwork. The crew of a V-bomber consists of two pilots, two navigators, and an air electronics officer.
MARK TWO CHANNEL; Responding to our pleas for rare photographs, Swedish industrial designer Bjorn Karlstrom of Bromma has submitted this hitherto unpublished photograph of the one and only Supermarine Channel Mk. II which was supplied to the Royal Swedish Navy ca. 1919. Herr Karlstrom says that the Channel II was well thought of and regarded as "the most beautiful craft of its day". Unfortunately, it crashed at Fjaderholmarna, near Stockholm, killing the pilot. The Mk. II was powered by a 240-h.p. Siddeley Puma (Mk. I: 160-h.p. Beardmore), and was a post-war development of the Admiralty Air Dept. A.D. Flying-Boat of 1915, built by Pemberton-Billing Ltd., which later became Supermarine Aviation Works Ltd. of Southampton.
Will you fly V-bombers? You must be good to be selected for V-bomber duties. The responsibilities call for sound teamwork. The crew of a V-bomber consists of two pilots, two navigators, and an air electronics officer.
Your flying career begins. Once you have received your 'wings', and completed your operational conversion training, you are ready to join a squadron. This is one of the big moments in a career crowded with adventure, travel, opportunity, and achievement.
The end of the one and only Vickers Valiant B. Mk. 2, photographed by J. C. Pritchard on its way to the breakers' yard.
These photographs show the arrival of Wellesleys L2638 and L2680 at Ismailia from Upper Heyford, prior to the take-off on the long-distance record attempt to Darwin, Australia, on 5th to 7th November 1938. After service three machines (L2639) set off at 0555 local time (0355 G.M.T.) piloted by S/Ldr. Kellett. F/Lt. Hogan and F/Lt. Coobine. Photo: L2680
These photographs show the arrival of Wellesleys L2638 and L2680 at Ismailia from Upper Heyford, prior to the take-off on the long-distance record attempt to Darwin, Australia, on 5th to 7th November 1938. After service three machines (L2639) set off at 0555 local time (0355 G.M.T.) piloted by S/Ldr. Kellett. F/Lt. Hogan and F/Lt. Coobine. Photo: L2638.
Formerly in service with the Fairey Aviation Co. Lid., the Rapide OO-AFG (initials of Avions Fairey Gossalies) is now flying with oversize windows similar to a Dragon I and electrically operated flaps.
The yellow Piper Cub N9830F was repainted at Fairoaks ex-G-AlYV with the licence number properly belonging to the Constellation which was once G-ANUV.
Based al Venice Lido Airport and subjected to high utilisation in the pleasure flight and club flying roles, the dark red Lombardi F.L.3s l-AVIG (photo) and 'IH and the Lombardi L.M.7 l-TTEN, are a common sight in the area. Both types are powered by the 60 h.p. C.A.N. D-4.
WHO'S THE PILOT? From a Tiger Moth (G-APJP) owner, J. Pothecary of Salisbury, Wiltshire, comes this fragment of a late-production Bristol T.B.8 Tractor Biplane 2-seat trainer of 1914-15. The neatly cowled rotary is a 100-h.p. Gnome Monosoupape. Its particular history is unknown to Mr. Pothecary. We know that about thirty-six T.B.8s were built, of which some were supplied to the R.N.A.S., and six went to Roumania. Earlier variants were powered by the 80-h. p. category rotaries, Gnome, Le Rhone and Clerget. Span 37 ft. 8 in.; length 29 ft. 3 in.; max. speed 73 m.p.h.
The Republic XF-91.
The Piaggio P.136L SE-CDE cfn. 208 at its home base, Bromma, Stockholm, where it has been in use by Dagens Nyheter since July 1956. A second British registered aircraft of this type, G-APNY has recently visited Croydon.
The R.W.3 Multoplan D-EFUP c/n. 005 at Blackbushe during its tour of the United Kingdom recently. Our correspondents have reported its presence al a number of aerodromes, the last being Shoreham on 13th August.
Based al Venice Lido Airport and subjected to high utilisation in the pleasure flight and club flying roles, the dark red Lombardi F.L.3s l-AVIG and 'IH and the Lombardi L.M.7 l-TTEN (photo), are a common sight in the area. Both types are powered by the 60 h.p. C.A.N. D-4.
SHIP OF THE AIR. Another reader of Air Pictorial has sent along this "strange device" which he claims was flown at pine Point, U.S.A., in April 1930 by its "inventor", John Domenjoz. Car-towed at 50 m.p.h. on a 500-ft. cable, this "sailplane" reached an altitude of 200 ft. above the sands at Old Orchard. The idea is obvious but its fate is obscure. Readers, please advise.
BOGNOR "BLOATER". From Roger Straker of Bognor Regie, Sussex, comes this fascinating photograph of the Bognor "Bloater" - otherwise the White & Thompson Admiralty landplane of 1915. Only two photographs are extant and these were unearthed by historian J. M. Bruce. The Bloater" gained its nickname from the scaly effect created by copper wire-stitching the cedar plywood-covered monococque fuselage. Twelve were ordered for the R.N.A.S. and built by W. & T. Lid. at Bognor - testing being carried out on Middleton sands, as shown here. Power was a 70-h.p. Renault. Performance details are not known. Can any reader assist?
THE STRATO-GYRO According to our contributor the story of the "Stratosphere-Gyro" of August 1930 is one of "faith moving mountains but not helicopters. The inventor/constructor/pilot of this one-off was a "Dr." Valentine Newbauer, ironically enough of Hollywood, Calif. It seems the inventor believed that his 3,496-lb. machine would shoot up into the Kennelly Heaviside Layer (some 50 miles above the earth) and would then permit him to remain stationary while the earth revolved beneath him. His hope was to spy through a telescope and pick out a likely spot to land in Germany. The tank capacity for the unspecified engine was 44 gallons, giving a cruising radius of 700 miles. Unfortunately, the Strato-Gyro never left the ground.
Another almost unknown type of World War I, this time the Wibault 10. (Wib.1 ???)