Flight 1931-06
Flight
SOME SUCESSFUL SOPWITHS: THE SNIPE WAS ALSO A USEFUL TYPE, AND ON IT MAJOR BARKER, V.C., FOUGHT 60 GERMANS, AND SHOT DOWN 4.
MEMBERS OF THE DE HAVILLAND "FAMILY": A LATER TYPE, THE D.H.9A THIS HAD THE AMERICAN LIBERTY ENGINE.
ONE OF THREE FAMOUS TYPES: THE SOPWITH 1 1/2-STRUTTER WAS USED BY NOS. 43, 45. AND 70 SQUADRONS UP TO 1917.
OF FRENCH ORIGIN: THE SPAD WAS A BLERIOT PRODUCT, BUT WAS ALSO BUILT IN ENGLAND.
Aircraft Manufacturing Company-built Eagle-engined DH.4 A7995 at Hendon. Note the windscreen applied to the modified gunner/observer's position, the aircraft probably being used for communications purposes.
ONE OF THREE FAMOUS TYPES: THE MORANE-SAULNIER MONOPLANE WAS USED IN LARGE NUMBERS. AND WAS LATER COPIED BY FOKKER;
SOME NEW FORMATIONS WILL BE SEEN AT THIS YEAR'S DISPLAY: THE MACHINES IN THESE ILLUSTRATIONS ARE HAWKER "HARTS" (ROLLS-ROYCE "KESTREL") FLOWN BY NO. 12 (BOMBER) SQUADRON.
AN OLD TIMER: A replica of a Bleriot monoplane, type XI, which was flown at Hanworth by M. Quatremarre.
BORN 1910 AND STILL GOING STRONG: M. Quatremarre flying the Bleriot monoplane at Hanworth.
SOME EARLY AEROPLANES: THE BLERIOT MONOPLANE, SHOWN IN 4, WAS A TWO-SEATER. LATERAL CONTROL WAS BY WING-WARPING
SOME AIRCRAFT FACTORY PRODUCTS: THE B.E.2 WAS THE FORERUNNER OF A SERIES OF TYPES. IT HAD WARPING WINGS.
THE ROYAL FLYING CORPS, MILITARY WING, 1914: THIS PICTURE RECALL THE PRE-WAR DAYS OF THE R.F.C. AND SHOW B.E. MACHINES OF "A" FLIGHT AT THE CENTRAL FLYING SCHOOL, UPAVON.
SOME AIRCRAFT FACTORY PRODUCTS: THE B.E.2C WAS FAMOUS FOR ITS STABILITY, AND WAS BUILT IN LARGE NUMBERS DURING THE WAR.
THE BARNARD "CIRCUS" AT THE BRISTOL AIRPORT: The "Jupiter"-engined Fokker "Spider" taking up the Lord Mayor of Bristol, and party.
AN UNUSUAL VIEW OF THE BRISTOL "BULLDOG": Mr. C. F. Uwins doing a vertical bank. The picture should be held overhead to give an idea of how the machine appeared to the onlookers.
THE VICKERS "GUN BUS": THIS PHOTOGRAPH SHOWS THE "PROTOTYPE," AND WAS TAKEN BEFORE THE WAR. THE PILOT IS THE LATE MR. HAROLD BARNWELL.
THE AIRWAYS OF BOLIVIA: Some of the Junkers machines used by the Lloyd Aero Bolivano are shown in the illustration
THE AIRWAYS OF BOLIVIA: One of the Junkers machines used by the Lloyd Aero Bolivano are shown in the illustration
MORE AIRCRAFT FACTORY PRODUCTS: THE R.E.8 WAS A PHOTOGRAPHY AND RECONNAISSANCE MACHINE. AT ONE TIME IT WAS SAID TO BE DANGEROUS, BUT EXPERIENCE TAUGHT PILOTS HOW TO HANDLE IT.
THE BRITISH ARMY BIPLANE: AFTER SEVERAL PREVIOUS ATTEMPTS AT HEAVIER-THAN-AIR FLIGHT, COL. S. F. CODY. IN JANUARY, 1909. SUCCEEDED IN MAKING A "FLIGHT" OF 20 YARDS ON LAFFAN'S PLAIN IN THIS MACHINE, CONSTRUCTED AT THE BALLOON FACTORY, ALDERSHOT.
"FACTORY DESIGNED": THE S.E. 5A WAS AN EARLY SINGLE-SEATER FIGHTER, AND WAS FLOWN BY (AMONG OTHERS) MAJOR MANNOCK, V.C.
THE ROYAL FLYING CORPS, MILITARY WING, 1914: THIS PICTURE RECALL THE PRE-WAR DAYS OF THE R.F.C. AND SHOW SOME OF THE MAURICE FARMANS OF "B" FLIGHT AT THE CENTRAL FLYING SCHOOL, UPAVON.
THE "BRISFIT": THE BRISTOL FIGHTER WAS ONE OF THE MOST SUCCESSFUL TYPES DURING THE WAR. IT WAS GIVEN TO NOS. 43, 45 AND 70 SQUADRONS IN 1917.
"BORN 1913 AND STILL GOING STRONG": THE AVRO 504, WHICH BEGAN ITS CAREER AS AN OFFENSIVE AIRCRAFT EARLY IN THE WAR, LATER BECAME THE STANDARD TRAINING MACHINE. AMONG ITS EXPLOITS WAS THE BOMBING OF THE ZEPPELIN SHEDS AT FRIEDRICHSHAFEN.
AN EARLY MILITARY MACHINE: THE BRISTOL "BOX KITE" RESEMBLED IN A GENERAL WAY THE FARMANS OF THE SAME PERIOD. IT WAS FITTED WITH A GNOME ROTARY ENGINE DRIVING A PUSHER AIRSCREW. MANY EARLY PILOTS WERE TRAINED ON THIS TYPE OF MACHINE.
ONE OF THREE FAMOUS TYPES: THE SOPWITH TRIPLANE WAS USED EXTENSIVELY BY R.N.A.S. SQUADRONS IN FRANCE, AND HELPED TO BEAT THE GERMAN ALBATROS AND HALBERSTADT MACHINES.
Michael Detroyat and his Morane Saulnier 230 on whi ch he gave demonstrations of aerobatics.
ANOTHER ECHO: Major Sydney Cotton's Bellanca Monoplane, in which he set off to the rescue of Mr. Courtauld. Upon reaching Iceland Major Cotton learned that the rescue had been effected, and then returned home.
Walter Lees (right) and Frederic Brossy (left) checking up on their fuel supply before taking off on the record-breaking non-refuelling endurance flight in the Bellanca "Pacemaker" Monoplane with 225 h.p. Packard-Diesel engine.
Bellanca "Pacemaker" Monoplane with 225 h.p. Packard-Diesel engine, in which the new World's Non-Refuelling Endurance Record was made by remaining aloft 84 hours 33 minutes, at Jacksonville, Florida, May 25 to 28, 1931.
SOME SUCESSFUL SOPWITHS: THE DOLPHIN WAS DESIGNED FOR ALTITUDE WORK IN 1918.
STRENUOUS BUT USEFUL: There was a close finish in the "Utility Race" between the crews of a Parnall "Elf" and a De Havilland "Puss Moth," the latter arriving on the ground first but gliding a long way, while the "Elf" was landed very near the finishing line.
CONVINCING: This photograph shows better than any we have seen the ability of the Cierva "Autogiro" to land in a confined space. The pilot was Mr. Brie.
THE SOPWITH "TABLOID": THE FORERUNNER OF A LONG FAMILY OF MACHINES. THIS LITTLE SINGLE-SEATER MAY BE SAID TO HAVE LAID THE FOUNDATION OF THE FAME OF THE SOPWITH FIRM.
MORE AIRCRAFT FACTORY PRODUCTS: THE B.E.12 WAS USED, AMONG OTHERS, BY NO.17 SQUADRON AT SALONIKA IN 1917.
THE "STAR TURN": The Hawker "Fury" (Rolls-Royce "Kestrel") was demonstrated in masterly fashion at Brooklands by Mr. Sayer, Hawker's Test Pilot.
INTERCEPTING EXTRAORDINARY: Our Photographer has caught the Hawker "Fury" (Rolls-Royce "Kestrel" engine) high above the clouds as Mr. Bulman swung it up and out in an Immelman Turn after "attacking" a Hawker "Horseley" piloted by Mr. Sayer.
IN SQUADRON VEE FORMATION: No. 600 City of London Bomber Squadron flying over Hanworth.
NEW SERVICE MACHINE AT VINCENNES: The Potez 39 all-metal observation plane (500 h.p. Renault)
THE LOW-LIMIT: Mr. Edwardes, Klemm (Salmson), waiting for the flag. He was first man away and led for many miles en route to Cramlington. Mr. Reynolds is the timekeeper while Capt. Dancy, on his right, looks as if he was satisfied with the work he and Mr. Rowarth had done in handicapping the entries (and rightly so too!).
An unusual touch was lent to the Parliamentary visit to Hanworth by the presence of a replica of the old Bleriot monoplane, Type XI, and the latest commercial aircraft, the Handley Page "Hannibal." Many of the visitors saw, for the first time, a Bleriot monoplane in flight
MODERN COMFORT: The after cabin in the "Hannibal" (Eastern Type). The forward cabin is reached through the corridor seen in the background.
THE ORLY MEETING: Miss Winifred Spooner in the "Puss Moth" who also paid a visit to Orly.
SEEN AT HESTON: Mrs. Alan Butler is standing by the nose of her Puss Moth.
STRENUOUS BUT USEFUL: There was a close finish in the "Utility Race" between the crews of a Parnall "Elf" and a De Havilland "Puss Moth," the latter arriving on the ground first but gliding a long way, while the "Elf" was landed very near the finishing line.
A view from the pupils' position of the instrument board lowered. The instruments include clock, revolution indicator, air speed indicator, turn and bank indicator, altimeter, artifical horizon compass and course and drift indicator.
Another view with the instrument board raised. It will be seen that the forward view is now not interfered within in any way at all.
"FACTORY DESIGNED": THE F.E.2B, 120 BEARDMORE ENGINE, WAS USED BY NO.20 SQUADRON AND OTHERS, AND HELPED TO DEFEAT THE FOKKER MONOPLANE. IT WAS A PUSHER, WITH OPEN TAIL GIRDER.
OF FRENCH ORIGIN: THE NIEUPORT 1 1/2 PLANE WAS CHARACTERISED BY A VERY SMALL LOWER WING.
NEW COMMERCIAL MACHINE AT VINCENNES: The Wibault 3-engined (250 h.p. Wright Hispano) all-metal transport
The Junkers G.38 (4 Junkers engines).
THE BUSINESS END OF D.2000: The two inner engines of the Junkers G.38 are Junkers L.88 of 800 h.p. each, while the two other engines are Junkers L.8, of 350 h.p. each.
NOT DECORATIVE: The biplane tail of the Junkers G.38 does not add to the beauty of the machine, but a large-span monoplane tail behind four engines would probably have had an unhappy time of it.
MEMBERS OF THE DE HAVILLAND "FAMILY": IN 4. IS SEEN THE D.H.5, A SINGLE-SEATER FIGHTER WITH 100 LE RHONE ROTARY ENGINE.
MEMBERS OF THE DE HAVILLAND "FAMILY": THE D.H.10 WAS A TWIN-ENGINED BOMBER.
An "Iris" (three 650 h.p. "Condors") of No. 209 (Flying Boat) Squadron cruising off the Devon coast.
An "Iris" of No. 209 (Flying Boat) Squadron.
A new version of the Avian, which is now at Heston. It belongs to Cellon, Ltd., and has a 7-cylinder Genet Engine.
A. V. Roe & Co., Ltd., have recently supplied an Avian (Hermes II) to the Gothenburg Aero Club. The machine was subscribed for by prominent business men in Gothenburg, and was flown to Sweden by Mr. Gosta Andree, Secretary of the Club.
COMPETITORS AND JUDGES: The photograph shows Mr. R. F. Hall and his passenger, Dr. Templeton, who, in a Hermes-Avian, won for the Lancashire Aero Club the S.B.A.C. Cup for a race from London to Bristol.
THE ROYAL FLYING CORPS, NAVAL WING: THE NAVAL WING, SUBSEQUENTLY KNOWN AS THE ROYAL NAVAL AIR SERVICE, CARRIED OUT MANY EXPERIMENTS WITH AIRCRAFT CO-OPERATING WITH THE FLEET. HERE WE SEE A SHORT BIPLANE (WITH FLOTATION GEAR) BEING HOISTED ABROAD H.M S. "HIBERNIA." WHICH WAS EQUIPPED WITH A PLATFORM FROM WHICH AIRCRAFT COULD TAKE OFF
No. 500 (County of Kent) (Bomber) Squadron. The first "Virginia" of the new Cadre Squadron at Manston was christened "Isle of Thanet" by the Mayors of Margate and Ramsgate on June 4.
A NEW BREGUET TRANSPORT MACHINE: The Breguet 391T is a development of the famous military type 27, but is fitted with three Gnome-Rhone "Titan" engines of 230 h.p. each. The machine has seating accommodation for 10 passengers.
COMPETITORS AND JUDGES: The photograph shows Mr. H. Thomas, a director of the Bristol Aeroplane Company, and his son setting off from Filton for the Air Port at Whitchurch in a Bristol machine piloted by Mr. Campbell.
THE POBJOY ENGINE IN A COMPER "SWIFT": Actually these photographs show an earlier model, but the "R" type will be fitted with a similar cowling.
HAWKER "WOODCOCK": Single-seater Fighter, with Bristol "Jupiter" Engine
"THAT WAS A GOOD AEROPLANE THAT IS": Reversing the now famous "Shell" slogan seems apt in connection with this Hawker "Danecock" with Armstrong-Siddeley "Jaguar" engine which, although delivered by the Hawker Company to the Danish Naval Air Service in 1924, has recently won the Nordic Cup Competition piloted by Lieutenant Erik Rastnussen, Royal Danish Navy. The course was one of 800 miles, and pilots from Norway, Sweden, Finland and Denmark took part. The "Danecock" is still the standard fighter in Denmark, and the same officer and machine still hold the Scandinavian altitude record established just over two years ago.
THE HANDLEY PAGE "HYDERABAD" TWIN-ENGINED NIGHT BOMBER.
NEW TYPE AT ORLY: The Couzinet 3-engined postal plane (40 h.p. Salmson)
WARTIME FLYING BOAT: THE TYPE F.3.
WARTIME FLYING BOAT: THE TYPE F.5.
CODY'S "CATHEDRAL": IT WAS ON A MACHINE OF THIS TYPE THAT CODY WON THE MILITARY TRIALS IN 1912.
The photograph is unique, as our photographer has caught a III F just as the pilot gave the rudder a final kick to enable him to see the deck before landing. The smoke and hot air from the funnel are apt to cause bumps and bad visibility when coming up astern, and it is necessary to slew the aircraft about somewhat before putting her down in order to get a clear view of the deck.
The late Marcel Lalouette, winner of the Reserved Officers Associated Section in the Inter-Club Speed Contest (Vincennes-Tours and return) for the President's Prize. He was flying a Farman 231 (95 h.p. Renault).
FIRST BRITISH "AVION SANITAIRE": A Desoutter monoplane (Hermes) has been fitted up as a Red Cross machine.
SEEN AT HESTON: FIt.-Lt. Stainforth gets ready for the race in his Spartan.
NEW SERVICE MACHINE AT VINCENNES: The Le O 20-3 4-engined bomber (Gnome-Rhone "Titan K7")
AT VINCENNES: A view of a portion of the crowd and the Grand Stand. - The machine in the air is the Le O 20-3 bomber.
THE ESCORT: Liore and Olivier machines accompanied Capt. Costes on the flight to Croydon.
Westland, following upon the Pterodactyl l experience, elected to forego the Mk. II and III projected tailless fighters in favour of the more modest Mk. IV three-seater research vehicle. The sole example, K1947, first flew in June 1931 and was powered by a 120hp DH Gipsy III. The Mk. IV's maximum achievable speed in level flight was 113mph. Interestingly, in an effort to cure the roller-coaster excursions of the Mk. I, Capt. Hill reverted to using elevons on the Mk. IV, in place of swivelling wingtip, but the pitch control problems appear to have remained unaffected.
Officers and Airmen of No. 204 (Flying Boat) Squadron.
The Marine Section at Mount Batten. In front is a motor dinghy. The large craft is a semi-Diesel pinnace. Behind that is a Brooks "Stand-by," to attend at taking-off and landing. Furthest away is a twin-screw refueller.
Picture of "Southampton" of No. 204 (Flying Boat) Squadron taking off in Plymouth Sound.
Picture of "Southamptons" of No. 204 (Flying Boat) Squadron taking off in Plymouth Sound. The breakwater can be seen ahead.
Picture of "Southamptons" of No. 204 (Flying Boat) Squadron taking off in Plymouth Sound.
No. 204 (Flying Boat) Squadron.
Three "Southamptons" (two Napier "Lion" engines) of No. 204 (Flying Boat) Squadron in formation off the Devon coast.
THE BARNARD "CIRCUS" AT THE BRISTOL AIRPORT: A Potez with "Bees a Securete," or slots fitted permanently open.
WIRELESS EQUIPMENT OF "KENT" FLYING BOATS: In our issue for May 15 we described the Marconi Wireless Equipment installed in the Short "Kent" flying boats used on Imperial Airways. We are now able to give illustration showing one of the flying boats with the masts and aerials which enable the pilot to communicate when on the water
WIRELESS EQUIPMENT OF "KENT" FLYING BOATS: In our issue for May 15 we described the Marconi Wireless Equipment installed in the Short "Kent" flying boats used on Imperial Airways. We are now able to give illustration showing the receiving and transmitting equipment installed in the hull
A VISITOR AT VINCENNES: During (he National Aviation Meeting at Vincennes on May 24-25 (reported in our issue for June 5), the Bleriot "125" twin-fuselage bi-motor monoplane provided one of the chief items of interest amongst the new types presented.
THE HEAVY STUFF: Although a freight carrier, the Vickers "Vellore" (2 "Jupiters") was looped and generally stunted by Mr. Summers at the Brooklands Meeting.
THE AVRO "LYNX" IS A TRAINING MACHINE.
SEEN AT HESTON: Mr. J. E. Carberry with his Monocoupe.
THE NEW CURTISS-REID "RAMBLER": Three-quarter front view of the new model constructed by the Montreal firm of Curtiss-Reid. It is fitted with sn inverted D.H. Gipsy III engine.
BREDA DEVELOPMENTS: Our illustration shows view of the new Breda "15" light monoplane, fitted with a 110 h.p. "Argus A.S.8" inverted engine.
BREDA DEVELOPMENTS: Our illustration shows view of the new Breda "15" light monoplane, fitted with a 110 h.p. "Argus A.S.8" inverted engine. The installation of an inverted engine in this machine has been the means of considerably improving the view forward from the cabin - as may be gathered from the illustration, showing an interior view from the rear seat. We understand that the inverted D.H. "Gipsy" and "Cirrus Hermes" engines will also be fitted in the "15-S" machines.
AN ECHO OF THE COURTAULD RESCUE: One of the D.H. "Moths" of the British Arctic Air Expedition fitted with skies, which attempted to reach Mr. Courtauld when he was stranded on the Greenland ice gap. The Esquimoes, who had never before seen an aeroplane, are helping to refuel the machine before it set out on its unsuccessful attempt.
BACK IN RECORD TIME: Mr. Scott's Gipsy Moth was a great centre of attraction at Hanworth, whither he flew it from Brooklands.
FRANCO-BRITISH COUSINS: The French (Morane) and British "Moths" photographed side by side at the recent Orly Meeting.
SEEN AT HESTON: Miss Amy Johnson takes off in "Jason III."
FORMATION FLYING BY CENTRAL FLYING SCHOOL INSTRUCTORS: THESE "GIPSY-MOTHS" WILL BE SEEN AT THE DISPLAY. IN THE LOWER PHOTOGRAPH THE LEADER IS INVERTED, WHILE THE OTHER MACHINES ARE "RIGHT WAY UP." IN THE UPPER PICTURE ALL THE MACHINES ARE INVERTED.
The N.F.S. Moth (Cirrus III), which was fitted out to tow Herr Krause. The arrangement to keep the towing cable clear of the tail units seems adequate for the job and was made and designed in the N.F.S. workshops at Hanworth.
Mr. Lissant Beardmore with his Proffessor Sailplane, on which he crossed the Channel the day before Herr Kronfeld did the return trip.
Capt. Joseph Thoret looking over his glider before taking off, and giving a demonstration of towed gliding at the Vincennes Meeting held on May 24 and 25. Capt. Thoret will be remembered by readers of "Flight" for the trips he gives over the Alps from the aerodrome of Passy-Le Fayet in his Potez machines. His knowledge of gliding has helped him a great deal when flying round Mount Blanc, and he has often made prolonged flights with his engine throttled right down.
THE HIGH-LIMIT. Mr. Percival, the last man away, loses no time in getting his Hendy 302 (Hermes II) off the ground.
SEEN AT HESTON: Mr. Percival gets into his comfortable and fast Hendy 302.
A worm's eye view of Lowe Wylde on his glider.
Herr Fuchs of the Akademische Fliegergruppe Darmstadt, landing at Staaken in the "Starkenburg," after having flown from the Tempelhof Aerodrome over the City of Berlin. He was towed up to gain his initial altitude by a Klemm (Argus).
Mr. Mole about to take off in the Scud at Rottingdean. The small size of this glider is very evident here.
[MB-61] NEW COMMERCIAL MACHINE AT VINCENNES: The Marcel Block 3-engined (120-h.p. Lorraine) all-metal postal plane.
NEW TYPE AT ORLY: The Albert 2-seater low-wing monoplane, with 85 h.p. Walter engine.
AN INTERESTING AMERICAN LIGHT PLANE: The Northrop Beta is fitted with a Menasco Buccaneer inverted engine of 160 h.p., with which engine it is expected the machine will have a top speed of 175 m.p.h. The machine is of all metal construction, with stressed-skin wing covering.
Herr Krause, whose attempt to advertise Lyons Tea by gliding the Channel in his "Falke," was forstalled by Herr Kronfeld.
A PROMISING NEWCOMER: The Monospar machine, with two 45 h.p. Salmson engines, is an experimental type with many interesting features. It was demonstrated at Hanworthby Sqd. Ldr. Rollo Haig.